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Injury and Violence

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Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

Deaths related to injury and violence include deaths such as those due to motor vehicle crashes, unintentional drug overdoses, falls, suicides, or homicides. Between 2007 and 2016, the death rate from all injuries, regardless of intent, increased by 15.6%, from 59.7 to 69.0 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted). Between 2007 and 2016, the change in the homicide rate, which is included in the all injury death rate, was not statistically significant (6.1 per 100,000 in 2007 and 6.2 per 100,000 in 2016, age adjusted). In 2016, several population groups had lower rates of injury death and homicide than their counterparts, including the Asian or Pacific Islander population and women. While those residing in metropolitan areas had a lower rate of all injury deaths, they had a higher rate of homicide than those living in non-metropolitan areas.

Injury Deaths (IVP-1.1) 

  • Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-1.1 tracks the death rate from all injuries regardless of intent (unintentional, intentional, and undetermined).
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2007, 59.7 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) were caused by injuries.
    • HP2020 Target: 53.7 deaths per 100,000 population, a 10% improvement over the baseline.
    • Most Recent: In 2016, 69.0 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) were caused by injuries.
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Asian or Pacific Islander population had the lowest injury death rate, 25.9 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2016. The age-adjusted rates for other racial and ethnic groups were:
    • 76.9 injury deaths per 100,000 population among American Indian or Alaska Native persons (highest rate); 3 times the best group rate
    • 76.0 injury deaths per 100,000 population among white non-Hispanic persons; more than 2.5 times the best group rate
    • 75.8 injury deaths per 100,000 population among black non-Hispanic persons; more than 2.5 times the best group rate
    • 44.3 injury deaths per 100,000 population among Hispanic or Latino persons; 71.1% higher than the best group rate
  • In 2016, females had a lower age-adjusted injury death rate than males (40.5 versus 98.9 deaths per 100,000 population). The rate for males was more than twice the rate for females.
  • Persons living in metropolitan areas had a lower age-adjusted injury death rate than persons living in non-metropolitan areas (66.3 versus 85.3 deaths per 100,000 population) in 2016. The rate for persons living in non-metropolitan areas was 28.6% higher than the rate for persons living in metropolitan areas.
  • Persons aged less than 18 years had the lowest injury death rate, 12.5 deaths per 100,000 population in 2016, among broad age groups. Rates for other age groups were:
    • 79.7 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 18–44 years; more than 6 times the best group rate
    • 80.0 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 45–64 years; more than 6 times the best group rate
    • 127.7 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 65 years and over (highest rate); more than 10 times the best group rate
  • When further refining the age groups, persons aged 5–11 years had the lowest injury death rate, 4.7 deaths per 100,000 population in 2016. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 16.4 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 0–4 years; 3.5 times the best group rate
    • 18.2 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 12–17 years; more than 3.5 times the best group rate
    • 70.9 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 18–24 years; more than 14.5 times the best group rate
    • 82.9 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 25–44 years; 17.5 times the best group rate
    • 82.5 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 45–54 years; more than 17 times the best group rate
    • 77.4 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 55–64 years; more than 16 times the best group rate
    • 67.7 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 65–74 years; more than 14 times the best group rate
    • 131.8 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 75–84 years; more than 27.5 times the best group rate
    • 388 injury deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 85 years and over (highest rate); more than 81.5 times the best group rate

Injury Death Rate by Sex, 2016

Injury Death Rate by Sex, 2016

Data sources: National Vital Statistics System–Mortality (NVSS–M), CDC/NCHS; and Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.

 
Endnotes:
  • Unrounded values with additional decimal places beyond what are shown here are used in calculating health disparities, including identifying the best group and calculating the differences between groups. Rounded values displayed here are used in calculating changes over time and percent change needed to meet the target.
  • Unless otherwise stated, all comparisons described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends.
  • Data for this measure are available annually from the National Vital Statistics System–Mortality (NVSS–M), CDC/NCHS; and Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.
  • Data (except those by age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups less than 1, 1–4, 5–14, 15–24, 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85 years and over. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates.

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Homicides (IVP-29) 

  • Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-29 tracks the homicide rate.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2007, there were 6.1 homicides per 100,000 population (age adjusted).
    • HP2020 Target: 5.5 homicides per 100,000 population, a 10% improvement over the baseline.
    • Most Recent: In 2016, there were 6.2 homicides per 100,000 population (age adjusted).
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Asian or Pacific Islander population had the lowest age-adjusted rate of deaths from homicide, 1.8 per 100,000 population in 2016. Rates for other racial and ethnic groups were:
    • 22.8 homicides per 100,000 population among black non-Hispanic persons (highest rate); 12.5 times the best group rate
    • 6.7 homicides per 100,000 population among American Indian or Alaska Native persons; more than 3.5 times the best group rate
    • 5.3 homicides per 100,000 population among Hispanic or Latino persons; more than 2.5 times the best group rate
    • 2.9 homicides per 100,000 population among white non-Hispanic persons; 58.1% higher than the best group rate
  • Females had a lower age-adjusted homicide rate than males (2.5 versus 9.9 homicides per 100,000 population) in 2016. The homicide rate for males was 4 times the rate for females.
  • Persons living in non-metropolitan areas had a lower age-adjusted homicide rate than persons living in metropolitan areas (5.3 versus 6.3 deaths per 100,000 population) in 2016. The rate for persons living in metropolitan areas was 18.4% higher than the rate for persons living in non-metropolitan areas.
  • Persons aged 65 years and over had the lowest homicide rate, 2.0 deaths per 100,000 population in 2016, among broad age groups. Rates for other age groups were:
    • 2.2 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged less than 18 years; 8.8% higher than the best group rate
    • 11.4 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 18–44 years; more than 5.5 times the best group rate
    • 4.2 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 45–64 years; more than twice the best group rate
  • When further refining the age groups, persons aged 5–11 years had the lowest homicide rate, 0.6 deaths per 100,000 population in 2016. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 3.1 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 0–4 years; 5 times the best group rate
    • 3.2 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 12–17 years; more than 5 times the best group rate
    • 14.5 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 18–24 years (highest rate); more than 23 times the best group rate
    • 10.3 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 25–44 years; more than 16.5 times the best group rate
    • 5.0 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 45–54 years; more than 8 times the best group rate
    • 3.4 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 55–64 years; 5.5 times the best group rate
    • 2.0 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 65–74 years; more than 3 times the best group rate
    • 2.0 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 75–84 years; more than 3 times the best group rate
    • 1.9 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged 85 years and over; more than 3 times the best group rate

Homicides by Race/Ethnicity, 2016

Homicides by Race/Ethnicity, 2016

Data sources: National Vital Statistics System–Mortality (NVSS–M), CDC/NCHS; and Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.

Endnotes:
  • Unrounded values with additional decimal places beyond what are shown here are used in calculating health disparities, including identifying the best group and calculating the differences between groups. Rounded values displayed here are used in calculating changes over time and percent change needed to meet the target.
  • Unless otherwise stated, all comparisons described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends.
  • Data for this measure are available annually from the National Vital Statistics System–Mortality (NVSS–M), CDC/NCHS; and Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.
  • Data (except those by age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups less than 1, 1–4, 5–14, 15–24, 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85 years and over. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates.