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TU-17.2 Data Details

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TU-17.2 Increase the Federal and State tax on smokeless tobacco products

About the Data: National

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation System (STATE); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (CDC/NCCDPHP)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
No
Measure: 
number
Baseline (Year): 
2010
Target: 
52
Target-Setting Method: 
Maintain consistency with national programs, regulations, policies, and laws.
Target-Setting Method Justification: 
The 2000 report of the U.S. Surgeon General, Reducing Tobacco Use, concluded that raising tobacco excise taxes is one of the most effective tobacco prevention and control strategies. Specifically, it found that increasing the price of tobacco products would decrease the prevalence of tobacco use, particularly among youth and young adults, and that tobacco excise tax increases would lead to substantial long-term improvements in health. Currently, the excise tax rates on smokeless products are not commensurate with those of cigarettes even though smokeless tobacco is a significant health risk and is not a safe substitute for smoking cigarettes (NCI, 1992). The HP2020 target is set at an increase by an amount equal to $1.50 per pack of cigarettes by each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Federal Government over the decade, based on the formula used for the April 1, 2009, Federal tobacco tax increase, in order to make the tax on smokeless tobacco products commensurate with the tax on cigarettes.
Numerator: 

Number of states, D.C., and the Federal government that increased smokeless tobacco taxes by $1.50 per unit or the equivalent.

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Adapted from HP2010 objective
Data Collection Frequency: 
Annual
Methodology Notes: 

    For the purpose of measuring this indicator, the Federal government is counted as the 52nd 'state'. The data for each year are counted as of January 1.

    Smokeless tobacco includes all loose leaf and non-combustible tobacco, generally sold in packages weighing 1.2 oz. For those products that do not meet these criteria, including those sold in discrete single-use pouches, capsules, units, or in packages of single dose units, the target tax increase per each single does unit is also $1.50.

Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 27-21b in that the Healthy People 2010 objective measured the number of states and D.C. that increased taxes on smokeless tobacco during the tracking period. This objective measures the number of states, DC, and the Federal government that, over the Healthy People 2020 tracking period, increased smokeless tobacco taxes by $1.50 per unit or the equivalent.

About the Data: State

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

Data Source: 
State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation System (STATE); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (CDC/NCCDPHP)
Measure: 
number
Numerator: 

Number of states, D.C., and the Federal government that increased smokeless tobacco taxes by $1.50 per unit or the equivalent.

Data Collection Frequency: 
Annual
Methodology Notes: 

      For the purpose of measuring this indicator, the Federal government is counted as the 52nd 'state'. The data for each year are counted as of January 1.

      Smokeless tobacco includes all loose leaf and non-combustible tobacco, generally sold in packages weighing 1.2 oz. For those products that do not meet these criteria, including those sold in discrete single-use pouches, capsules, units, or in packages of single dose units, the target tax increase per each single does unit is also $1.50.

References

Additional resources about the objective

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2000.