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TU-1.1 Data Details

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TU-1.1 Reduce cigarette smoking by adults
LHI

Leading Health Indicators are a subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives selected to communicate high-priority health issues.

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/NCHS)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
No
Measure: 
percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
Baseline (Year): 
20.6 (2008)
Target: 
12.0
Target-Setting Method: 
Retention of Healthy People 2010 target
Target-Setting Method Justification: 
According to the recent American Journal of Preventive Medicine article, “Reaching Healthy People 2010 by 2013” Levy et al. concluded that a goal of 12 percent could be reached before 2020 if a comprehensive set of policies related to tobacco tax/price increases, smokefree air laws, mass media/educational campaigns, and cessation treatment are implemented. If policies are implemented nationwide, the goal of 12 percent could be achievable within 5 to 12 years.
Numerator: 

Number of persons aged 18 years and over who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in lifetime and who now report smoking cigarettes everyday or some days

Denominator: 

Number of persons aged 18 years and over

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Retained from HP2010 objective
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

    From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

    [NUMERATOR:]

    Have you smoked at least 100 cigarettes in your entire life?

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know

    [If yes:] Do you now smoke cigarettes everyday, some days, or not at all?

    1. Everyday
    2. Some days
    3. Not at all
    4. Refused
    5. Don't know
Data Collection Frequency: 
Annual
Leading Health Indicator:
Tobacco Use
Methodology Notes: 

    Persons are considered as using cigarettes if they report that they smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and now report smoking cigarettes everyday or some days.

    Age Adjustment Notes: 

    This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

    • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Family Income: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
    • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
Starting in 1992, The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has defined current smokers as persons who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and now smoke either everyday or some days. The 1992 inclusion of intermittent smoking increased the prevalence of smoking by approximately one percent compared with estimates derived from the previous smoking definition.

References

Additional resources about the objective

  1. CDC. Cigarette smoking among adults---United States, 2007. MMWR 2008; 57:1221-1226.
  2. CDC. State-specific smoking-attributable mortality and years of potential life lost---United States, 2000—2004. MMWR 2009; 58:29-33.