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SH-1 Data Details

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SH-1 Increase the proportion of persons with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea who seek medical evaluation

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
Yes
Measure: 
percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
Baseline (Year): 
25.6 (2005–08)
Target: 
27.8
Target-Setting Method: 
Minimal statistical significance
Target-Setting Method Justification: 
The target is the smallest improvement that results in a statistically significant difference when tested against the baseline value, assuming the same standard error for the target as for the baseline.
Numerator: 

Adults 20 years and over who report symptoms of sleep apnea and who have ever told a doctor that they have trouble sleeping

Denominator: 

Adults 20 years and over who report symptoms of sleep apnea

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Retained from HP2010 objective
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

    From the 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey:

    [NUMERATOR:]

    {Have you/Has SP} ever told a doctor or other health professional that {you have/s/he has} trouble sleeping?

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know

    [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

    In the past 12 months, how often did {you/SP} snore while {you were/s/he was} sleeping?

    1. Never
    2. Rarely (1-2 nights/week)
    3. Occasionally (3-4 nights/week)
    4. Frequently (5 or more nights/week)
    5. Refused
    6. Don't know

    In the past 12 months, how often did {you/SP} snort, gasp, or stop breathing while {you were/s/he was} asleep?

    1. Never
    2. Rarely (1-2 nights/week)
    3. Occasionally (3-4 nights/week)
    4. Frequently (5 or more nights/week)
    5. Refused
    6. Don't know

    In the past month, how often did {you/SP}] feel excessively or overly sleepy during the day?

    1. Never
    2. Rarely (1 time a month)
    3. Sometimes (2-4 times a month)
    4. Often (5-15 times a month)
    5. Almost always (16-30 times a month)
    6. Refused
    7. Don't know

    How much sleep {do you/does SP} usually get at night on weekdays or workdays?

    ______ Hours

Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

    Persons were considered to have symptoms of sleep apnea if they answered the questions listed under denominator as follows: (snoring 3 or more nights per week) OR (snort, gasp or stop breathing 3 or more nights per week) OR (feel excessively sleepy during the day almost always 16-30 times per month AND usually sleep 7 or more hours per night on weekdays or worknights).

    Age Adjustment Notes: 

    This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

    • Total: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Sex: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Race/Ethnicity: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Educational Attainment: 25-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Country of Birth: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Disability Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Health Insurance Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-64
    • Marital Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Veteran Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
    • Obesity Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+

Revision History

Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
In 2018, the baseline was revised from 25.5% to 25.6% due to a programming error. The target was revised from 28.0% to 27.8%, using the original target setting method of minimal statistical significance.