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RD-7.8 Data Details

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RD-7.8 Increase the proportion of adults with current asthma who have discussed with a doctor or other health professional whether their asthma was work related according to National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
National Health Interview Survey
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
Yes
Measure: 
percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
Baseline (Year): 
14.4 (2010)
Target: 
17.9
Target-Setting Method: 
Minimal statistical significance
Target-Setting Method Justification: 
The target setting method used was Minimal Statistical Significance. The target value of 17.9% represents the smallest change that will result in a significant improvement over the baseline value of 14.4%. There are insufficient data points (1) upon which to base a projection using other forecasting methods. Due to a small percent value (14.4%) and the small standard error in the baseline value (1.251), a default increase of 10% from the base line value of 14.4% to a target value of 15.9% is not sufficient to indicate significant change. A 24% increase to 17.9% is required to reach statistical significance.
Numerator: 

Number of persons age 18 and over with current asthma who are currently employed or who were employed at some time in the past 12 months and who have discussed with a doctor or other health professional whether their asthma was work-related

Denominator: 

Number of persons age 18 and over with current asthma who are currently employed or employed at some time in the past 12 months

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Not applicable
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

    From the 2010 National Health Interview Survey Occupational Health Supplement:

    [NUMERATOR:]

    Have you been told by a doctor or other health professional that your asthma [fill: was probably caused by your work/was probably made worse by your work/was ever made worse by any job you have ever had]?

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don’t know

    Did YOU ever discuss with a doctor or other health professional whether your asthma [fill: was probably caused by your work/was probably made worse by your work/was ever made worse by any job you have ever had]?

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don’t know

    [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

    Although you did not work last week, did you have a job or business at any time in the PAST 12 MONTHS?

    1. Had job last week
    2. Yes
    3. No
    4. Refused
    5. Don’t know

    Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you had asthma?

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don’t know

    Do you still have asthma?

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don’t know
Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

    Persons are classified as having discussed with a doctor or other health professional whether their asthma was work-related if they responded “yes” to either question listed under Numerator. The doctor may have discussed work-related asthma with the respondent but ruled it out, or the doctor may have told the respondent that their asthma was probably work-related. Both situations indicate that the topic was addressed.

    Assessing whether a person's asthma might be work-related is only appropriate if the person is currently employed or was recently employed. Persons are classified as currently employed or employed at some time in the past 12 months if they reported having a job in the previous week or if they responded “yes” to the employment question listed under Numerator and Denominator.

    To maintain consistency with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), the case definition for asthma is based on ‘current’ asthma (yes to ‘ever asthma’ and yes to ‘still asthma’).

    Updated clinical treatment guidelines for asthma were released in 2007. The NHLBI guidelines retain this recommendation: “The expert panel recommends that clinicians query patients who are employed and have asthma about possible occupational exposures, particularly those who have new-onset disease.”

    Age Adjustment Notes: 

    This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

    • Total: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Sex: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Family Type: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-54, 55-64
    • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
    • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-54, 55+
Target Calculation Methods: 
The target is the smallest improvement that results in a statistically significant difference (at the 0.05 level of significance) when tested against the baseline value, assuming the same standard error for the target as the baseline.

Revision History

Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
In 2013, this objective became measurable.

References

Additional resources about the objective

  1. Balmes J, Becklake M, Blanc P, Henneberger P, Kreiss K, Mapp C, Milton D, Schwartz D, Toren K, Viegi G. American Thoracic Society Statement: Occupational contribution to the burden of airway disease. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003;167(5):787-97.
  2. Breton CV, Zhang Z, Hunt PR, Pechter E, Davis L. Characteristics of work related asthma: results from a population based survey. Occup Environ Med. 2006;63(6):411-5.
  3. Henneberger PK, Derk SJ, Sama SR, Boylstein RJ, Hoffman CD, Preusse PA, Rosiello RA, Milton DK. The frequency of workplace exacerbation among health maintenance organization members with asthma. Occup Environ Med. 2006;63(8):551-7.