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OSH-7 Data Details

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OSH-7 Reduce the proportion of persons who have elevated blood lead concentrations from work exposures

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
Adult Blood Lead Epidemiology and Surveillance Program (ABLES); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (CDC/NIOSH)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
Yes
Measure: 
per 100,000
Baseline (Year): 
27.7 (2008)
Target: 
24.9
Target-Setting Method: 
10 percent improvement
Numerator: 

Number of persons aged 16 years and older with blood lead levels of 10 µg/dL or greater in States that participate in the ABLES program

Denominator: 

Number of employed persons aged 16 years and older, by State

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Adapted from HP2010 objective
Data Collection Frequency: 
Annual
Methodology Notes: 

    ABLES is a state-based surveillance program of laboratory-reported adult blood lead levels funded by NIOSH in 40 states (as of 2010). The program's objective is to build state capacity to initiate, expand, or improve adult blood lead surveillance programs which can accurately measure trends in adult blood lead levels and which can effectively intervene to prevent lead over-exposures. The ABLES program aims to accomplish this objective by building state capacity to initiate or improve adult blood lead surveillance programs which can accurately measure trends in adult blood lead levels and which can effectively intervene to prevent lead over-exposures. ABLES states are required to have a mandatory state requirement that laboratories report blood lead level results to the state health department or designee. Starting in 2009, the ABLES case definition for elevated blood lead levels was changed from 25 µg to 10 µg/dL which is consistent with guidance from the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. CDC has also included in 2010, for the first time, elevated blood lead levels (defined as BLL = 10 µg/dL) in the list of national notifiable conditions. Therefore, this measure uses the updated case definition of 10 µg/dL or greater.

    Forty States reported 9,290 resident adults with elevated blood lead levels of 25 µg/dL or greater in 2008. The vast majority of elevated blood lead levels are work-related. Twenty-three States reported 17,572 resident adults with elevated blood lead levels of 10 µg/dL or greater in 2008. Despite important progress, overexposure to inorganic lead continues to be an important public health problem worldwide. Furthermore, recent research has increased concerns about the toxicity of lead at low doses.

Revision History

Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
Target was changed from 20.2% to 24.9% in February 2017 to correct original baseline calculation.

References

Additional resources about the objective

  1. Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics. 2007. Medical Management Guidelines for Lead-Exposed Adults.
  2. CDC. Nationally Notifiable Non-Infectious Conditions. United States 2010. Elevated Blood Lead Levels.
  3. Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. 2009. Public Health Reporting and National Notification for Elevated Blood Lead Levels.
  4. Kosnett MJ, Wedeen RP, Rothenberg SJ, Hipkins KL, Materna BL, Schwartz BS, Hu H, Woolf A.Recommendations for medical management of adult lead exposure. Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Mar;115(3):463-71.