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MICH-31.2 Data Details

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MICH-31.2 Increase the proportion of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs who receive their care in family-centered, comprehensive, coordinated systems

About the Data: National

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN); Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (HRSA/MCHB and CDC/NCHS)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
No
Measure: 
percent
Baseline (Year): 
13.8 (2005–06)
Target: 
15.1
Target-Setting Method: 
10 percent improvement
Numerator: 

Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs who receive their care in family-centered, comprehensive, and coordinated systems

Denominator: 

Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Not applicable
Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

    Six indicators are used to measure the quality of a system of care for CSHCN aged 12-17 years: Families of children and youth with special health care needs partner in decision making at all levels and are satisfied with the services they receive; Children and youth with special health care needs receive coordinated Updated: Ongoing comprehensive care within a medical home; Families of CSHCN have adequate private and/or public insurance to pay for the services they need; Children are screened early and continuously for special health care needs; Community-based services for children and youth with special health care needs are organized so families can use them easily; Youth with special health care needs receive the services necessary to make transitions to all aspects of adult life, including adult health care, work, and independence. A child is considered to be served by a “service system,” as described in the Healthy People objective, if his or her care met all relevant criteria for his or her age. For children from birth through age 11 years, the first five outcomes were included, and all six outcomes were counted for children from age 12 through 17 years. Children with Special Health Care Needs CSHCN were identified using the CSHCN Screener, which consists of five questions concerning common health care consequences experienced by CSHCN.

About the Data: State

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

Data Source: 
National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN); Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (HRSA/MCHB and CDC/NCHS)
Measure: 
percent
Numerator: 

Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs who receive their care in family-centered, comprehensive, and coordinated systems

Denominator: 

Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs

Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

      Six indicators are used to measure the quality of a system of care for CSHCN aged 12-17 years: Families of children and youth with special health care needs partner in decision making at all levels and are satisfied with the services they receive; Children and youth with special health care needs receive coordinated Updated: Ongoing comprehensive care within a medical home; Families of CSHCN have adequate private and/or public insurance to pay for the services they need; Children are screened early and continuously for special health care needs; Community-based services for children and youth with special health care needs are organized so families can use them easily; Youth with special health care needs receive the services necessary to make transitions to all aspects of adult life, including adult health care, work, and independence. A child is considered to be served by a “service system,” as described in the Healthy People objective, if his or her care met all relevant criteria for his or her age. For children from birth through age 11 years, the first five outcomes were included, and all six outcomes were counted for children from age 12 through 17 years. Children with Special Health Care Needs CSHCN were identified using the CSHCN Screener, which consists of five questions concerning common health care consequences experienced by CSHCN.