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MICH-16.6 Data Details

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MICH-16.6 Increase the proportion of women delivering a live birth who used contraception postpartum to plan their next pregnancy

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
California's Maternal and Infant Health Assessment (MIHA); California Department of Public Health (CDPH)
Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (CDC/NCCDPHP)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
Yes
Measure: 
percent
Baseline (Year): 
88.6 (2011)
Target: 
97.5
Target-Setting Method: 
10 percent improvement
Target-Setting Method Justification: 
Given the current prevalence of this health behavior, a 10% improvement over baseline as a target setting method is both realistic and aspirational. In addition, given that we are half way through the decade for Healthy People 2020, setting a target at a level of 10% improvement over baseline is meaningful.
Numerator: 

Number of women with a recent live birth who reported using contraception 2-8 months after delivery

Denominator: 

Number of women with a recent live birth

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Not applicable
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

    From the 2011 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System:

    [NUMERATOR:]

    Are you or your husband or partner doing anything now to keep from getting pregnant? (Some things people do to keep from getting pregnant include not having sex at certain times [natural family planning or rhythm] or withdrawal, and using birth control methods such as the pill, condoms, vaginal ring, IUD, having their tubes tied, or their partner having a vasectomy.)

    • Yes
    • No

    What are your reasons or your husband’s or partner’s reasons for not doing anything to keep from getting pregnant now? Check all that apply

    1. I am not having sex
    2. I want to get pregnant
    3. I don’t want to use birth control
    4. My husband or partner doesn’t want to use anything
    5. I don’t think I can get pregnant (sterile)
    6. I can’t pay for birth control
    7. I am pregnant now
    8. Other

    From the 2011 Maternal and Infant Health Assessment:

    [NUMERATOR:]

    Are you or your husband or partner doing anything now to keep from getting pregnant?
    (Some things people do to keep from getting pregnant include using birth control pills,
    condoms, withdrawal, or natural family planning.)

    • Yes
    • No

    What are your reasons for not doing anything to keep from getting pregnant now?
    Check ALL that apply

    1. I am not having sex
    2. I want to get pregnant
    3. I don’t want to use birth control
    4. I am worried about side effects from birth control
    5. My husband or partner doesn’t want to use anything
    6. I can’t pay for birth control
    7. I have problems getting birth control when I need it
    8. I had my tubes tied or blocked
    9. My husband or partner had a vasectomy
    10. I am pregnant now
    11. Other

    What kind of birth control are you or your husband or partner using now to keep from getting pregnant? Check ALL that apply.

    1. Tubes tied or blocked (female sterilization)
    2. Vasectomy (male sterilization)
    3. Birth control pills, patch, vaginal ring
    4. Condoms
    5. Shots or injections (Depo-Provera, Lunelle)
    6. Implants (Implanon)
    7. IUD (Mirena or ParaGard)
    8. Natural family planning (rhythm, temperature)
    9. Withdrawal (pulling out)
    10. Not having sex (abstinence)
    11. Other
Data Collection Frequency: 
Annual
Methodology Notes: 

    The following PRAMS states were included in preparing the 2011 estimate: AR, CO, DE, GA, HI, IL, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MO, NE, NJ, NM, NY, NYC, OK, OR, PA, RI, UT, VT, WA, WV, WI, and WY. These data were combined with data from the California's Maternal and Infant Health Assessment to produce the displayed estimate.

    Contraception use is reported at the time the survey was completed between 2 and 8 months postpartum. Women who reported they were not having sex or were currently pregnant were excluded.

    Contraception use includes reversible and non-reversible methods as well as natural family planning methods.

    Health Insurance status data reflect prenatal care insurance coverage of mother.

Trend Issues: 
The set of states on which this estimate is based will vary over time as only states that meet established response rate thresholds are included. 28 sites were included in preparing the baseline estimate for 2011.

Revision History

Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
In 2015, the objective wording was changed from, "Increase the proportion of women delivering a live birth who used contraception to plan pregnancy" to "Increase the proportion of women delivering a live birth who used contraception postpartum to plan their next pregnancy" because available data do not permit the assessment of contraception use during the preconception period for all women of reproductive age. Tracking interconception use of contraception to plan a subsequent pregnancy is important given that both short (less than 18 months) and long (greater than 59 months) interpregnancy intervals have been significantly associated with increased risk for poor perinatal outcomes. Additionally, the objective moved from developmental to measurable.

References

Additional resources about the objective

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommendations to improve preconception health and health care – United States: a report of the CDC/ATSDR Preconception Care Work Group and the Select Panel on Preconception Care. MMWR 2006; 55 (No. RR-6).
  2. Institute of Medicine. Preventing low birth weight. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1985.
  3. Korenbrot C, Steinberg A, Bender C, Newberry S (2002). Preconception care: A systematic Review. MCH Journal, Vol. 7, No 2, pp.75-88.