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FP-3.1 Data Details

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FP-3.1 Increase the proportion of publicly funded family planning clinics that offer the full range of FDA-approved methods of contraception onsite

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
Survey of Contraceptive Service Providers
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
Yes
Measure: 
percent
Baseline (Year): 
53.6 (2010)
Target: 
67.0
Target-Setting Method: 
Projection/trend analysis
Target-Setting Method Justification: 
Data on the proportion of publicly funded family planning clinics that offer access to FDA-approved contraceptive methods onsite indicate that the least-offered methods are intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants. The majority (54 percent) of clinics offered IUDs onsite in 2003. To increase the availability of these methods, a number of initiatives are under way to train providers on inserting IUDs and implants. A 25-percent improvement in the number of clinics offering the full range of methods is proposed.
Numerator: 

Number of publicly funded family planning clinics that reported offering all FDA-approved methods of contraception onsite

Denominator: 

Number of publicly funded family planning clinics

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Not applicable
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

    From the 2010 Survey of Contraceptive Service Providers:

    [NUMERATOR:]

    For each of the following methods of contraception, indicate whether:

    1. The method/service is provided or prescribed at this site
    2. Clients are referred to another clinic/provider within your agency/organization for this method/service
    3. Clients are referred to a clinic/provider that is not affiliated with your agency/organization for this method/service
    4. The method/service is not provided and referrals are not given
    1. Oral Contraceptives (OCs)
    2. Extended OC regimen (Seasonale, Seasonique)
    3. IUD: Mirena
    4. IUD: Paragard (Copper-T)
    5. Injectable (Depo-Provera)
    6. Patch (Ortho Evra)
    7. Vaginal ring (NuvaRing)
    8. Diaphram, cervical cap (Lea's Shield, FemCap)
    9. Sponge (Today)
    10. Male condom
    11. Female condom
    12. Spermicides
    13. Natural family planning (NFP) instruction
    14. Emergency contraception
    15. Female sterilization (Tubal ligation, Tubal ligation (Essure))
    16. Vasectomy
Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

    Family planning clinics are considered to have offered the full range of FDA-approved contraceptive methods if they offered all methods that, at the time of data collection, were available in the United States and had been approved by the FDA for at least three years. At baseline (2010 data), clinics were considered to have offered the full-range of FDA approved contraceptive methods if they offered all of the following methods onsite: oral contraceptives, long-acting reversible contraception (IUD or implant), injectable (Depo-Provera), other hormonal methods (patch or ring), male barrier (condom), female barrier (diaphragm or cervical cap or sponge or female condom or spermicides), and emergency contraception. Methods that have been approved by the FDA for at least three years are not included in the numerator in order to give clinics a reasonable amount of time after a method is approved to update their clinic protocols and purchasing arrangements.

    The Guttmacher Institute conducts a periodic survey of agencies and clinics providing subsidized family planning services in the United States and its jurisdictions. Data for this objective are derived from the periodic survey of family planning clinics (including Title X-funded clinics, health departments, hospitals, community health centers, independent clinics, and Planned Parenthood clinics).

Revision History

Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
In 2013, the original baseline and baseline year were revised from 38.3% in 2003 to 56.6% in 2010 as a result of changes in methodology. The target was adjusted from 47.9% to 67% to reflect the revised baseline using original target-setting method.