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ENT-VSL-13.2 Data Details

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ENT-VSL-13.2 Increase the proportion of adults who have tried recommended methods for treating their balance or dizziness problem

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
National Health Interview Survey
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
No
Measure: 
percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
Baseline (Year): 
24.4 (2008)
Target: 
26.8
Target-Setting Method: 
10 percent improvement
Numerator: 

Number of persons aged 18 years and over with dizziness or balance problems in the past 12 months who have tried recommended methods for treating their balance or dizziness problem

Denominator: 

Number of persons aged 18 years and over  with dizziness or balance problems in the past 12 months

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Not applicable
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

    From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey, Balance and Dizziness Supplement:

    [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

    DURING THE PAST 12 MONTHS, have you had a problem with dizziness or balance? Do not include times when drinking alcohol.

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know

    This next question is about symptoms of dizziness or balance problems. Please tell me if you have had any of these problems in the past 12 months. Please say yes or no to each.

    • A spinning or vertigo sensation, a rocking of yourself or your surroundings
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know
  • A floating, spacey, or tilting sensation
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know
  • Feeling lightheaded, without a sense of motion
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know
  • Feeling as if you are going to pass out or faint
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know
  • Blurring of your vision when you move your head
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know
  • Feeling off-balance or unsteady
    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know

    DURING THE PAST 12 MONTHS, which ONE of these feelings of dizziness or balance problems bothered you the most? [Read categories below.]

    1. Feeling a sense of spinning
    2. A floating or spacey feeling
    3. Feeling lightheaded
    4. Feeling like you are about to pass out
    5. Blurred vision
    6. Unsteadiness
    7. Refused
    8. Don't know

    [NUMERATOR:]

    These next questions are about treatments for balance or dizziness problems.

    Have you ever taken or tried anything to treat you most bothersome dizziness or balance problem such as physical therapy, certain exercises, avoiding certain foods, taking medicine, surgery, or wearing magnets or wristbands?

    1. Yes
    2. No
    3. Refused
    4. Don't know

    What treatments have you tried? Please say yes or no to each.

    1. Exercises or physical therapy (Do not include Tai Chi, Yoga, or Qi Gong)
    2. Head rolling maneuver by a doctor or therapist (Epley maneuver)
    3. Steroid injections into the ear
    4. Gentamicin injection into the ear
    5. Ear surgery
    6. Head or neck surgery
    7. Bed rest for several hours or days
    8. Psychiatric treatment
    9. Chiropractic treatment of manipulation
    10. Acupuncture
    11. Massage therapy
    12. Tai Chi, Yoga, or Qi Gong
    13. Hypnosis
    14. Low salt diet
    15. Avoiding or cutting back on certain foods or drinks such as chocolate, coffee or alcohol
    16. Quitting or reducing use of tobacco or cigarettes
    17. Prescription medicine or drugs
    18. Over the counter medicine such as aspirin, Tylenol, or Advil
    19. Herbal remedy such as feverfew leaf, ginger or ginkgo biloba
    20. Meniette device, air pressure pulses in ear
    21. Wearing acupressure wristband or Sea-Band
    22. Wearing magnets
    23. Mouth guard
    24. Refused
    25. Don't know
Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

    The denominator includes those persons who responded “yes” to having a problem with dizziness or balance in the past 12 months or “yes” to one or more of the six symptoms listed. The numerator includes persons who responded “yes” to having a problem with dizziness or balance or “yes” to one or more of the six symptoms AND responded “yes” to having tried treatments for their most bothersome dizziness or balance problem and “yes” to one of the listed treatments.

    Vestibular (inner ear balance) disorders can cause dizziness, vertigo, imbalance, problems with hearing, nausea, fatigue, anxiety, concentration, and other symptoms. They can deeply affect a person's day-to-day functioning, ability to work, social relationships, and quality of life. Balance is a state of body equilibrium or stability. The vestibular or balance disorders are among the most common complaints that lead patients to visit their primary care physicians and are one of the most common reasons elderly people seek medical advice.

    Age Adjustment Notes: 

    This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

    • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
    • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

References

Additional resources about the objective

  1. Gillespie LD, Gillespie WJ, Robertson MC, et al. 2004. Interventions for preventing falls in elderly people (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, Issue 3. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  2. Nelson D, Holtzman D, Bolen J, et al. 2001. Reliability and validity of measures from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Int J Public Health. 46, S3-S35.
  3. Rubenstein LZ, Solomon DH, Roth CP, et al. 2004. Detection and management of falls and instability in vulnerable elders by community physicians. J Am Geriatr Soc. 52(9):1527–1531.