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AH-2 Data Details

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AH-2 Increase the proportion of adolescents who participate in extracurricular and/or out-of-school activities

About the Data: National

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Data Source: 
National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH); Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (HRSA/MCHB and CDC/NCHS)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
Yes
Measure: 
percent
Baseline (Year): 
82.4 (2007)
Target: 
90.6
Target-Setting Method: 
10 percent improvement
Numerator: 

Number of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years participating in one or more organized extra-curricular and/or out-of-school activities

Denominator: 

Number of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years

Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
Not applicable
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

    From the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health:

    [NUMERATOR:]

    During the past 12 months, was [S.C.] on a sports team or did [he/she] take sports lessons after school or on weekends?

    1. YES
    2. NO
    3. DON’T KNOW
    4. REFUSED

    During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any clubs or organizations after school or on weekends?

    1. YES
    2. NO
    3. DON’T KNOW
    4. REFUSED

    During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any other organized events or activities?

    1. YES
    2. NO
    3. DON’T KNOW
    4. REFUSED
Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

    Responses to the three questions were combined into a single indicator that included 12 to 17 year olds who participated in one or more organized activities. In 2007, the third question was asked if the respondent answered "no" to the other two questions. In the 2011/12 survey, the third question was revised to "During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any other organized activities or lessons, such as music, dance, language, or other arts?," and asked of all children.

    Children with special health care needs are identified by parents’ reports that their child has a health problem expected to last at least 12 months and which requires prescription medication, more services than most children, special therapies, or which limits his or her ability to do things most children can do.

Trend Issues: 
The 2011/12 survey included the addition of cell phones to the sample. This has implications for the comparability of items between 2007 and 2011/12.

About the Data: State

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

Data Source: 
National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH); Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (HRSA/MCHB and CDC/NCHS)
Measure: 
percent
Numerator: 

Number of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years participating in one or more organized extra-curricular and/or out-of-school activities

Denominator: 

Number of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years

Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

      From the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      During the past 12 months, was [S.C.] on a sports team or did [he/she] take sports lessons after school or on weekends?

      1. YES
      2. NO
      3. DON’T KNOW
      4. REFUSED

      During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any clubs or organizations after school or on weekends?

      1. YES
      2. NO
      3. DON’T KNOW
      4. REFUSED

      During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any other organized events or activities?

      1. YES
      2. NO
      3. DON’T KNOW
      4. REFUSED
Data Collection Frequency: 
Periodic
Methodology Notes: 

      Responses to the three questions were combined into a single indicator that included 12 to 17 year olds who participated in one or more organized activities. In 2007, the third question was asked if the respondent answered "no" to the other two questions. In the 2011/12 survey, the third question was revised to "During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any other organized activities or lessons, such as music, dance, language, or other arts?," and asked of all children.

      Children with special health care needs are identified by parents’ reports that their child has a health problem expected to last at least 12 months and which requires prescription medication, more services than most children, special therapies, or which limits his or her ability to do things most children can do.

Trend Issues: 
The 2011/12 survey included the addition of cell phones to the sample. This has implications for the comparability of items between 2007 and 2011/12.

Revision History

Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 82.5 to 82.4 percent due to a change in the rounding method used. At launch conventional rounding was used for the displayed baseline; however Healthy People 2020 is using the 'round half to evens' rule for the display values this decade. The target was adjusted from 90.8 to 90.6 percent to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. There was a change in the way questions are asked in the 2011/12 survey. In 2007, the question, "During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any other organized events or activities?" was only asked of children with a "no" response to both of the other two numerator questions listed. In 2011 it was asked for all children. Also in 2011, the wording of the question was changed to read, "During the past 12 months, did [he/she] participate in any other organized activities or lessons, such as music, dance, language, or other arts?"