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Sexually Transmitted Diseases Data Details

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  • STD-1 Reduce the proportion of adolescents and young adults with Chlamydia trachomatis infections

    • STD-1.1 Reduce the proportion of females aged 15 to 24 years with Chlamydia trachomatis infections attending family planning clinics

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      STD Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      8.0 (2015)
      Target: 
      7.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of positive tests among women aged 15 to 24 years who attended family planning clinics in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number tests administered (unsatisfactory tests, indeterminate or inconclusive results, or inadequate specimens are excluded) among women aged 15 to 24 years who attended family planning clinics in the past 12 months

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Using visit-level data from women attending selected family planning/reproductive health clinics, annual chlamydia positivity among women aged 15-24 years who tested positive for chlamydia at least once in a given year among all women tested for chlamydia at least once in the same year were estimated.

        Chlamydia is usually asymptomatic. Consequently, in clinics with low screening coverage (suggesting they are primarily testing symptomatic, high-risk women) positivity will overestimate clinic prevalence. To minimize this possible bias, clinics were restricted to those that 1) reported data for at least 100 women aged 15-24 years in a given year and 2) documented that greater than 60% of women aged 15-24 years were tested for chlamydia in the same year. Additionally, as clinics participating in this surveillance system have varying volume, a simple aggregate estimate of positivity (i.e., numerator and denominator summed across all clinics) will be biased towards high-volume clinics. To address this bias, positivity for each clinic was calculated and then the mean positivity across all clinics was estimated.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2019, the baseline year was revised from 2008 to 2015. The (new) 2015 baseline value is 8.0%. The new target using the current target-setting method of 10% improvement is 7.2%. The baseline year and value were revised due to a change in methodology for further information please see the methodology section of the data details.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Case definitions for infectious conditions under public health surveillance. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 46 (RR-10): 1997.
    • STD-1.2 Reduce the proportion of females aged 24 years and under with Chlamydia trachomatis infections enrolled in a National Job Training Program

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      STD Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      12.8 (2008)
      Target: 
      11.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of females aged 24 years or younger who enrolled in a National Job Training Program in the past 12 months and tested positive for Chlamydia

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 24 years or younger who enrolled in a National Job Training Program in the past 12 months and tested positive or negative for Chlamydia

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Since 1990, approximately 20,000 female National Job Training Program entrants have been screened each year for Chlamydia. This program, administered by the National Job Training Program at more than 100 sites throughout the country, is a job training program for economically-disadvantaged youth aged 16-24 years-old..

        Data are limited to entrance exam testing; therefore, no one is included twice. All persons entering the National Job Training Program are required to be tested. .

        Chlamydia prevalence data on female National Job Training Program entrants are included when the number of females tested from a state was greater than or equal to 100. The baseline measure is median state-specific prevalence. Medians are reported when at least 20 states met the inclusion criteria.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Case definitions for infectious conditions under public health surveillance. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 46 (RR-10): 1997.
    • STD-1.3 Reduce the proportion of males aged 24 years and under enrolled in a National Job Training Program with Chlamydia trachomatis infections

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      STD Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      7.0 (2008)
      Target: 
      6.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of males aged 24 years or younger who enrolled in a National Job Training Program in the past 12 months and tested positive for Chlamydia

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 24 years or younger who enrolled in a National Job Training Program in the past 12 months and tested positive or negative for Chlamydia

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Methodology Notes: 

        Since 2004, approximately 35,000 male National Job Training Program entrants have been screened each year for Chlamydia. This program, administered by the National Job Training Program at more than 100 sites throughout the country, is a job training program for economically-disadvantaged youth aged 16-24 years-old..

        Data are limited to entrance exam testing; therefore, no one is included twice. All persons entering the National Job Training Program are required to be tested.

        Chlamydia prevalence data on male National Job Training Program entrants are included when the number of males tested from a state was greater than or equal to 100. The baseline measure is median state-specific prevalence. Medians are reported when at least 20 states met the inclusion criteria.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Case definitions for infectious conditions under public health surveillance. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 46 (RR-10): 1997.
  • STD-2 (Developmental) Reduce Chlamydia rates among females aged 15 to 44 years

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Numerator: 

    Number of new reported cases of Chlamydia among females aged 15-44 years in the past 12 months

    Denominator: 

    Number of females aged 15-44 years

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    This objective was archived in 2012. Chlamydia case rates (rates of reported chlamydial infection) are not a good measure of chlamydia burden, therefore, not an appropriate metric for health objectives at this time.
  • STD-3 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 24 years and under enrolled in Medicaid plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year

    • STD-3.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in Medicaid plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      52.7 (2008)
      Target: 
      70.9
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Projection/trend analysis
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Linear regression was conducted on Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) data from 1999 to 2009 for each age group and type of plan. Linear regression modeling estimated that if screening increases continued at the same rate, the rate for 16-to 20-year-olds enrolled in Medicaid plans would be 70.9 percent by 2020. Screening rates are not expected to exceed the rates of other reproductive health screenings. Cervical cancer screening has the highest screening rate of a reproductive health service as measured by HEDIS. The Pap test screening rate has been approximately 80 percent since 2000. The target is consistent with the National Prevention Strategy.
      Numerator: 

      Number of women 16-20 years of age who were identified as eligible in the denominator and who had at least one test for Chlamydia during the measurement year

      Denominator: 

      Number of women 16-20 years of age who were identified as sexually active and who had no more than one gap in enrollment of up to 45 days during the measurement year

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States. Untreated Chlamydia can progress to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that every year, undiagnosed and untreated STDs cause at least 24,000 women in the United States to become infertile.

        HEDIS is a widely-used set of performance measures in the managed-care industry, developed and maintained by NCQA. Annual data on Chlamydia screening rates, measured by the proportion of sexually active women aged 15-25 who received at least one Chlamydia test in the measurement year, have been collected in HEDIS since 2000. Screening rates for Medicaid health plans became available in 2001. In 2008, the upper age limit was changed from 25 to 24.

        Because of the silent nature of Chlamydia infections, routine screening in clinical and non-clinical settings is the cornerstone of effective STD-related infertility prevention. The HEDIS Chlamydia screening measure is a valuable indicator of commercial and Medicaid health plans’ progress toward increasing the proportion of sexually active women under 25 years of age who are screened at least annually for Chlamydia infections. This is especially important, as the majority of Chlamydia infections are reported from the private sector. The HEDIS data set provides information from health maintenance organizations (HMO) and point-of-service plans (POS).

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 25-16b in that objective 25-16b addressed Chlamydia screening among women aged 16 to 25 years enrolled in Medicaid care plans. For Healthy People 2020, the upper age limit was reduced to 24 years and the age category was split into two groups: 16 to 20 years and 21 to 24 years. This objective addresses Chlamydia screening among women aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in Medicaid plans.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The target was revised in 2013 from 74.4 percent to 70.9 percent due to a calculation error.
    • STD-3.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 21 to 24 years enrolled in Medicaid plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      59.4 (2008)
      Target: 
      80.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Projection/trend analysis
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Linear regression was conducted on Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) data from 1999 to 2009 for each age group and type of plan. Linear regression modeling estimated that if screening increases continued at the same rate, the rate for 21- to 24-year-olds enrolled in Medicaid plans would be 80.0 percent by 2020. Screening rates are not expected to exceed the rates of other reproductive health screenings. Cervical cancer screening has the highest screening rate of a reproductive health service as measured by HEDIS. The Pap test screening rate has been approximately 80 percent since 2000. The target is consistent with the National Prevention Strategy.
      Numerator: 

      Number of women 21-24 years of age who were identified as eligible in the denominator and who had at least one test for Chlamydia during the measurement year

      Denominator: 

      Number of women 21-24 years of age who were identified as sexually active and who had no more than one gap in enrollment of up to 45 days during the measurement year

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Methodology Notes: 

        Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States. Untreated Chlamydia can progress to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that every year, undiagnosed and untreated STDs cause at least 24,000 women in the United States to become infertile.

        HEDIS is a widely-used set of performance measures in the managed-care industry, developed and maintained by NCQA. Annual data on Chlamydia screening rates, measured by the proportion of sexually active women aged 15-25 who received at least one Chlamydia test in the measurement year, have been collected in HEDIS since 2000. Screening rates for Medicaid health plans became available in 2001. In 2008, the upper age limit was changed from 25 to 24.

        Because of the silent nature of Chlamydia infections, routine screening in clinical and non-clinical settings is the cornerstone of effective STD-related infertility prevention. The HEDIS Chlamydia screening measure is a valuable indicator of commercial and Medicaid health plans’ progress toward increasing the proportion of sexually active women under 25 years of age who are screened at least annually for Chlamydia infections. This is especially important, as the majority of Chlamydia infections are reported from the private sector. The HEDIS data set provides information from health maintenance organizations (HMO) and point-of-service plans (POS).

  • STD-4 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 24 years and under enrolled in commercial health insurance plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year

    • STD-4.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in commercial health insurance plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      40.1 (2008)
      Target: 
      61.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Projection/trend analysis
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Linear regression was conducted on Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) data from 1999 to 2009 for each age group and type of plan. Linear regression modeling estimated that if screening increases continued at the same rate, the rate for 16- to 20-year-olds enrolled in commercial health insurance plans would be 61.3 percent by 2020. Screening rates are not expected to exceed the rates of other reproductive health screenings. Cervical cancer screening has the highest screening rate of a reproductive health service as measured by HEDIS. The Pap test screening rate has been approximately 80 percent since 2000. The target is consistent with the National Prevention Strategy.
      Numerator: 

      Number of women 16-20 years of age who were identified as eligible in the denominator and who had at least one test for Chlamydia during the measurement year

      Denominator: 

      Number of women 16-20 years of age who were identified as sexually active and who had no more than one gap in enrollment of up to 45 days during the measurement year

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States. Untreated Chlamydia can progress to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that every year, undiagnosed and untreated STDs cause at least 24,000 women in the United States to become infertile.

        HEDIS is a widely-used set of performance measures in the managed-care industry, developed and maintained by NCQA. Annual data on Chlamydia screening rates, measured by the proportion of sexually active women aged 15-25 who received at least one Chlamydia test in the measurement year, have been collected in HEDIS since 2000. Screening rates for Medicaid health plans became available in 2001. In 2008, the upper age limit was changed from 25 to 24.

        Because of the silent nature of Chlamydia infections, routine screening in clinical and non-clinical settings is the cornerstone of effective STD-related infertility prevention. The HEDIS Chlamydia screening measure is a valuable indicator of commercial and Medicaid health plans’ progress toward increasing the proportion of sexually active women under 25 years of age who are screened at least annually for Chlamydia infections. This is especially important, as the majority of Chlamydia infections are reported from the private sector. The HEDIS data set provides information from health maintenance organizations (HMO) and point-of-service plans (POS).

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 25-16a in that objective 25-16a addressed Chlamydia screening among women aged 16 to 25 years enrolled in commercial health insurance plans. For Healthy People 2020, the upper age limit was reduced to 24 years and the age category was split into two groups: 16 to 20 years and 21 to 24 years. This objective addresses Chlamydia screening among women aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in commercial plans.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The target was revised in 2013 from 65.9 percent to 61.3 percent due to a calculation error.
    • STD-4.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 21 to 24 years enrolled in commercial health insurance plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      43.5 (2008)
      Target: 
      74.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Projection/trend analysis
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Linear regression was conducted on Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) data from 1999 to 2009 for each age group and type of plan. Linear regression modeling estimated that if screening increases continued at the same rate, the rate for 21- to 24-year-olds enrolled in commercial health insurance plans would be 74.6 percent by 2020. Screening rates are not expected to exceed the rates of other reproductive health screenings. Cervical cancer screening has the highest screening rate of a reproductive health service as measured by HEDIS. The Pap test screening rate has been approximately 80 percent since 2000. The target is consistent with the National Prevention Strategy.
      Numerator: 

      Number of women 21-24 years of age who were identified as eligible in the denominator and who had at least one test for Chlamydia during the measurement year

      Denominator: 

      Number of women 21-24 years of age who were identified as sexually active and who had no more than one gap in enrollment of up to 45 days during the measurement year

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Methodology Notes: 

        Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States. Untreated Chlamydia can progress to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that every year, undiagnosed and untreated STDs cause at least 24,000 women in the United States to become infertile.

        HEDIS is a widely-used set of performance measures in the managed-care industry, developed and maintained by NCQA. Annual data on Chlamydia screening rates, measured by the proportion of sexually active women aged 15-25 who received at least one Chlamydia test in the measurement year, have been collected in HEDIS since 2000. Screening rates for Medicaid health plans became available in 2001. In 2008, the upper age limit was changed from 25 to 24.

        Because of the silent nature of Chlamydia infections, routine screening in clinical and non-clinical settings is the cornerstone of effective STD-related infertility prevention. The HEDIS Chlamydia screening measure is a valuable indicator of commercial and Medicaid health plans’ progress toward increasing the proportion of sexually active women under 25 years of age who are screened at least annually for Chlamydia infections. This is especially important, as the majority of Chlamydia infections are reported from the private sector. The HEDIS data set provides information from health maintenance organizations (HMO) and point-of-service plans (POS).

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The target was revised in 2013 from 78.3 percent to 74.6 percent due to a calculation error.
  • STD-5 Reduce the proportion of females aged 15 to 44 years who have ever required treatment for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Survey of Family Growth
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    4.2 (2006–10)
    Target: 
    3.8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of females aged 15 to 44 years who have ever required treatment for PID

    Denominator: 

    Number of females aged 15 to 44 years

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Have you ever been treated for an infection in your fallopian tubes, womb, or ovaries, also called a pelvic infection, pelvic inflammatory disease, or P.I.D.?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    Methodology Notes: 

      There are no reliable national surveillance systems that measure women requiring treatment for PID. This measure, based on data from NSFG, is used as a proxy.

      PID is a subjective diagnosis made by physicians. Laparoscopy is required for a definitive diagnosis of PID. The data from the NSFG are self-reported and therefore may not be accurate, particularly due to the unknown prevalence of asymptomatic or subclinical PID.

      More than 50 percent of all preventable infertility among women is a result of STDs, primarily Chlamydia and gonorrhea. Because most infected women and at least one half of infected men have no symptoms or have such mild symptoms that they do not seek medical care, many infections go undetected and are not reported or counted. Untreated Chlamydia and gonorrhea infections can cause severe and costly reproductive and other adverse health consequences, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can lead to infertility. Between 10-20 percent of females with untreated Chlamydia infections develop PID, and 20 percent of those may become infertile.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    The original baseline was revised in 2012 from 4.0 percent to 4.2 percent due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 3.6 percent to 3.8 percent to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • STD-6 Reduce gonorrhea rates

    • STD-6.1 Reduce gonorrhea rates among females aged 15 to 44 years

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      279.9 (2008)
      Target: 
      251.9
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of gonorrhea among females aged 15-44 years in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15-44 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates are based on individual-level gonorrhea case report data electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of gonorrhea among females aged 15-44 years in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15-44 years

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          Rates are based on individual-level gonorrhea case report data electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The original baseline was revised in 2013 from 285.0 to 279.9 new cases per 100,000 females aged 15-44 years due to reporting delays. The target was adjusted from 257.0 to 251.9 new cases per 100,000 females aged 15-44 years to reflect the revised baseline using the original target setting method. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010 to Population Estimates. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
    • STD-6.2 Reduce gonorrhea rates among males aged 15 to 44 years

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      216.5 (2008)
      Target: 
      194.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of gonorrhea among males aged 15-44 years in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15-44 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates are based on individual-level gonorrhea case report data electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of gonorrhea among males aged 15-44 years in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15-44 years

      Methodology Notes: 

          Rates are based on individual-level gonorrhea case report data electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The original baseline was revised in 2013 from 220.0 to 216.5 new cases per 100,000 males aged 15-44 years due to reporting delays. The target was adjusted from 198.0 to 194.8 new cases per 100,000 males aged 15-44 years to reflect the revised baseline using the original target setting method. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010 to Population Estimates. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
  • STD-7 Reduce sustained domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis

    • STD-7.1 Reduce domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among females

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      1.4 (2008)
      Target: 
      1.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among females in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of females

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates are based on individual-level case report data of females with primary and secondary syphilis electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 25-3 in that objective 25-3 addressed syphilis transmission among all persons. Healthy People 2020 measures syphilis transmission separately for males and females. This objective addresses syphilis among females.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among females in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of females

      Methodology Notes: 

          Rates are based on individual-level case report data of females with primary and secondary syphilis electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The original baseline was revised in 2013 from 1.5 new cases per 100,000 females to 1.4 new cases per 100,000 females due to reporting delays. The target was adjusted from 1.4 new cases per 100,000 females to 1.3 new cases per 100,000 females to reflect the revised baseline using the original target setting method. The objective text was revised from "Reduce sustained domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among females" to "Reduce domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among females". In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010 to Population Estimates. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
    • STD-7.2 Reduce domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among males

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      7.4 (2008)
      Target: 
      6.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among males in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of males

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates are based on individual-level case report data of males with primary and secondary syphilis electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 25-3 in that objective 25-3 addressed syphilis transmission among all persons. Healthy People 2020 measures syphilis transmission separately for males and females. This objective addresses syphilis among males.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Population Estimates
      STD Surveillance System
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      Number of new reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among males in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of males

      Methodology Notes: 

          Rates are based on individual-level case report data of males with primary and secondary syphilis electronically sent to CDC through the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) and U.S. Census population data. The race categories used in this report were introduced to the NETSS record in 2008. As of 2011, 46 states and the District of Columbia report using the new format. Race and ethnicity will not be displayed until 100% of states report using the new format.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The original baseline was revised in 2013 from 7.6 new cases per 100,000 males to 7.4 new cases per 100,000 males due to reporting delays. The target was adjusted from 6.8 new cases per 100,000 males to 6.7 new cases per 100,000 males to reflect the revised baseline using the original target setting method. The objective text was revised from "Reduce sustained domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among males" to "Reduce domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among males". In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010 to Population Estimates. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
  • STD-8 Reduce congenital syphilis

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Vital Statistics System-Natality
    STD Surveillance System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    10.7 (2008)
    Target: 
    9.6
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of new reported cases of congenital syphilis in the past 12 months

    Denominator: 

    Number of live births

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Methodology Notes: 

      Pregnant women who are infected with syphilis can transmit the infection to the fetus causing congenital syphilis (CS) with serious adverse outcomes of the pregnancy in at least 50% of the cases. Elimination of congenital syphilis would contribute importantly to reduction of lost pregnancies, preterm/low birthweight infants and prenatal death.

      Although the numbers and rates of CS have been declining in the United States, there is a danger of a resurgence should syphilis recur among heterosexual populations. Yet, unlike many neonatal infections, this is a preventable disease which could be eliminated through effective antenatal screening and treatment of infected pregnant women.

      A minimum of 500 valid test results by gender and subpopulation is recommended to derive reliable estimates for this measure. Some clinics may not collect all U.S. Census-defined race and/or ethnicity data categories. Data are based on CDC congenital syphilis (CS) case investigation and report, Form 73.126.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    National Vital Statistics System-Natality
    STD Surveillance System
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Numerator: 

    Number of new reported cases of congenital syphilis in the past 12 months

    Denominator: 

    Number of live births

    Methodology Notes: 

        Pregnant women who are infected with syphilis can transmit the infection to the fetus causing congenital syphilis (CS) with serious adverse outcomes of the pregnancy in at least 50% of the cases. Elimination of congenital syphilis would contribute importantly to reduction of lost pregnancies, preterm/low birthweight infants and prenatal death.

        Although the numbers and rates of CS have been declining in the United States, there is a danger of a resurgence should syphilis recur among heterosexual populations. Yet, unlike many neonatal infections, this is a preventable disease which could be eliminated through effective antenatal screening and treatment of infected pregnant women.

        A minimum of 500 valid test results by gender and subpopulation is recommended to derive reliable estimates for this measure. Some clinics may not collect all U.S. Census-defined race and/or ethnicity data categories. Data are based on CDC congenital syphilis (CS) case investigation and report, Form 73.126.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    The original baseline was revised in 2013 from 10.1 new cases per 100,000 live births to 10.7 new cases per 100,000 live births due to reporting delays. The target was adjusted from 9.1 new cases per 100,000 live births to 9.6 new cases per 100,000 live births to reflect the revised baseline using the original target setting method.
  • STD-9 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of females with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection

    • STD-9.1 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of females with human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Potential Data Source: 
      National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of females aged 14 to 24 years with detectable HPV type 6 or 11 DNA

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 14 to 24 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
    • STD-9.2 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of females with human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Potential Data Source: 
      National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of females aged 14 to 24 years with detectable  HPV types 16 or 18 DNA

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 14 to 24 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
    • STD-9.3 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of females with other human papillomavirus (HPV) types

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Potential Data Source: 
      National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of females aged 14 to 49 years with a positive result from 43 HPV types

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 14 to 49

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
  • STD-10 Reduce the proportion of young adults with genital herpes infection due to herpes simplex type 2

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    10.5 (2005–08)
    Target: 
    9.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 20 to 29 years who test positive for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 20 to 29 years

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Methodology Notes: 

      This measure tracks the proportion of persons aged 20 to 29 years with a positive laboratory test result for herpes simplex virus, type 2, as measured by NHANES.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Case definitions for infectious conditions under public health surveillance. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 46 (RR-10): 1997.