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Family Planning Data Details

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  • FP-1 Increase the proportion of pregnancies that are intended

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Survey
    Surveillance Data for Abortion
    National Survey of Family Growth
    National Vital Statistics System-Natality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    51.0 (2002)
    Target: 
    56.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of intended births among females aged 15 to 44 years

    Denominator: 

    Number of live births plus abortions and fetal losses among females aged 15 to 44 years

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Before you became pregnant this time, was the reason you did not use any birth control methods because you, yourself wanted to become pregnant?

      _______________

      At the time you became pregnant, did you, yourself actually want to have a baby at some time?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know

      So would you say you became pregnant too soon, at about the right time, or later than you wanted?

      1. Too soon
      2. Right time
      3. Later
      4. Didn't care
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Intended pregnancies include births that were wanted at the time of conception. Births that were wanted at the time of conception are those resulting from pregnancies that happened at the right time, later than wanted, or those answering "didn’t care". All abortions are considered unintended pregnancies.

      Baseline estimates of pregnancies that were intended are derived from the following sources: (1) live births to U.S. residents in 2001; (2) the percent of recent births that were intended according to the 2002 NSFG; (3) estimates of total number of abortions for 2001; and (4) estimates of fetal losses from the 2002 NSFG. The total number of abortions for 2001 was obtained by adjusting the total number of abortions reported in a 2000 census of abortion providers for changes in comparable state-by-state abortion reports between 2000 and 2001. Population denominators are obtained from census estimates and from the Current Population Survey.

      The total number of unintended pregnancies was estimated by determining the percent of births and fetal losses that followed unintended pregnancies (as reported in the NSFG) and applying those percents to the actual numbers of each pregnancy outcome, and then adding all abortions. The number of unintended pregnancies was divided by the total number of pregnancies to obtain the percent of pregnancies that were unintended.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Finer, L. & Henshaw, S. (2005). Estimates of U.S. abortion incidence in 2001 and 2002. New York: The Guttmacher Institute.
    2. Finer, L. & Henshaw, S. (2006). Disparities in rates of unintended pregnancy in the United States, 1994 and 2001. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 38 (2), 90-96.
  • FP-2 Reduce the proportion of females experiencing pregnancy despite use of a reversible contraceptive method

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Survey
    National Survey of Family Growth
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    12.4 (2002)
    Target: 
    9.9
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Trend data from 1995 to 2002 show a decline in the proportion of females experiencing pregnancy despite use of a reversible contraceptive method. In 1995, the proportion of females experiencing pregnancy despite use of a reversible contraceptive method was 15 percent. In 2002, the proportion fell to 12 percent. Based on this trend, a 25-percent improvement is proposed.
    Numerator: 

    Number of pregnancies that occur within the first 12 months of reported continuous use of a reversible contraceptive method among females aged 15 to 44 years, and their partners

    Denominator: 

    Number of consecutive months that a reversible contraceptive method was used by females aged 15 to 44 years, and their partners

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Please write the methods you used each month on the calendar. I need to know about all the methods you used, so if you used more than one method, please write down all methods you used that month.

      1. Birth control pills
      2. Condom
      3. Partner's vasectomy
      4. Diaphragm
      5. Foam
      6. Jelly or cream
      7. Cervical cap
      8. Suppository, insert
      9. Today sponge
      10. Female condom, vaginal pouch
      11. IUD, Coil, Loop
      12. Norplant
      13. Depo-provera. Injectables
      14. Morning after pill
      15. Rhythm or safe period by calendar
      16. Safe period by temperature, cervical mucus test, natural family planning
      17. Withdrawal, pulling out
      18. Respondent sterile
      19. Partner sterile
      20. Other method (specify)

      How many months or weeks had you been pregnant when the baby was born/that pregnancy ended? [Note: this yields date pregnancy began.]

      From the 2001 Abortion Provider Survey:

      [DENOMINATOR:]

      Before you found out you were pregnant, what was the LAST contraceptive method that you used to prevent pregnancy, including rhythm, withdrawal or condoms?

      1. Pill
      2. Condom, rubber (for males)
      3. Female condom, vaginal pouch
      4. Diaphragm with or without jelly or cream
      5. Sponge (TODAY)
      6. Foam/cream/jelly
      7. Suppository, insert (Semicid, Encara Oval)
      8. IUD, coil, loop
      9. Rhythm/natural family planning
      10. Withdrawal
      11. Norplant, implants in the arm
      12. Depo-Prevera, injectables, shot
      13. Emergency contraception/morning-after pill
      14. Other method (specify)
      15. Never used a method before this pregnancy

      In what month and year did you stop using that method?

      ______/______Month Year

      For about how many months in a row had you been using that method?

      1. Less than 1 month
      2. 1 month
      3. 2 months
      4. 3 months
      5. 4 months
      6. 5 months
      7. 6 months
      8. 7 months
      9. 8 months
      10. 9 months
      11. 10 months
      12. 11 months
      13. 12 months
      14. 13 months
      15. 14 months
      16. 15 months
      17. 16 months
      18. 17 months
      19. 18-24 months
      20. 25-26 months
      21. 27-28 months
      22. 29-36 months
      23. 37 or more months (3 or more years)

      Had you ever used that method before the months specified above?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Had you stopped using all methods to prevent pregnancy before you became pregnant this time?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Pregnancies include live births, miscarriages, or induced abortions.

      Females are considered to have experienced pregnancy despite use of a reversible method if there was continuous method use (in 12-month intervals) and they became pregnant during a month of use of one or more of the following methods: birth control pills, condom (rubber), diaphragm, foam/jelly/cream, cervical cap, suppository, insert, Today™ sponge, female condom (vaginal pouch), IUD, coil, loop, Norplant, Depo-provera, injectables, withdrawal (pulling out), rhythm/natural family planning, or emergency contraception/morning-after pill.

      NSFG data are adjusted for underreporting of abortions using data from The Guttmacher Institute’s Abortion Patient Survey. Detailed information on adjustment procedure, contraceptive methods and failure rates have been published by The Guttmacher Institute.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Kost, K, Singh, S., Vaughan, B., Trussell, J., & Bankole, A. (2008). Estimates of contraceptive failure from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. Contraception, 77 (1), 10-21.
  • FP-3 Increase the proportion of publicly funded family planning clinics that offer the full range of FDA-approved methods of contraception, including emergency contraception, onsite

    • FP-3.1 Increase the proportion of publicly funded family planning clinics that offer the full range of FDA-approved methods of contraception onsite

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Survey of Contraceptive Service Providers
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      53.6 (2010)
      Target: 
      67.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Projection/trend analysis
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Data on the proportion of publicly funded family planning clinics that offer access to FDA-approved contraceptive methods onsite indicate that the least-offered methods are intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants. The majority (54 percent) of clinics offered IUDs onsite in 2003. To increase the availability of these methods, a number of initiatives are under way to train providers on inserting IUDs and implants. A 25-percent improvement in the number of clinics offering the full range of methods is proposed.
      Numerator: 

      Number of publicly funded family planning clinics that reported offering all FDA-approved methods of contraception onsite

      Denominator: 

      Number of publicly funded family planning clinics

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2010 Survey of Contraceptive Service Providers:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        For each of the following methods of contraception, indicate whether:

        1. The method/service is provided or prescribed at this site
        2. Clients are referred to another clinic/provider within your agency/organization for this method/service
        3. Clients are referred to a clinic/provider that is not affiliated with your agency/organization for this method/service
        4. The method/service is not provided and referrals are not given
        1. Oral Contraceptives (OCs)
        2. Extended OC regimen (Seasonale, Seasonique)
        3. IUD: Mirena
        4. IUD: Paragard (Copper-T)
        5. Injectable (Depo-Provera)
        6. Patch (Ortho Evra)
        7. Vaginal ring (NuvaRing)
        8. Diaphram, cervical cap (Lea's Shield, FemCap)
        9. Sponge (Today)
        10. Male condom
        11. Female condom
        12. Spermicides
        13. Natural family planning (NFP) instruction
        14. Emergency contraception
        15. Female sterilization (Tubal ligation, Tubal ligation (Essure))
        16. Vasectomy
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Family planning clinics are considered to have offered the full range of FDA-approved contraceptive methods if they offered all methods that, at the time of data collection, were available in the United States and had been approved by the FDA for at least three years. At baseline (2010 data), clinics were considered to have offered the full-range of FDA approved contraceptive methods if they offered all of the following methods onsite: oral contraceptives, long-acting reversible contraception (IUD or implant), injectable (Depo-Provera), other hormonal methods (patch or ring), male barrier (condom), female barrier (diaphragm or cervical cap or sponge or female condom or spermicides), and emergency contraception. Methods that have been approved by the FDA for at least three years are not included in the numerator in order to give clinics a reasonable amount of time after a method is approved to update their clinic protocols and purchasing arrangements.

        The Guttmacher Institute conducts a periodic survey of agencies and clinics providing subsidized family planning services in the United States and its jurisdictions. Data for this objective are derived from the periodic survey of family planning clinics (including Title X-funded clinics, health departments, hospitals, community health centers, independent clinics, and Planned Parenthood clinics).

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, the original baseline and baseline year were revised from 38.3% in 2003 to 56.6% in 2010 as a result of changes in methodology. The target was adjusted from 47.9% to 67% to reflect the revised baseline using original target-setting method.
    • FP-3.2 Increase the proportion of publicly funded family planning clinics that offer emergency contraception onsite

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Survey of Contraceptive Service Providers
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      79.7 (2003)
      Target: 
      87.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of publicly funded family planning clinics that report offering emergency contraception onsite

      Denominator: 

      Number of publicly funded family planning clinics

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2003 Survey of Contraceptive Service Providers:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Which contraceptive methods are prescribed and/or dispensed at one or more sites in your agency and at each selected site? [Check all that apply.]

        1. Oral Contraceptives (OCs)
        2. IUD: Mirena
        3. IUD: Paragard (Copper-T)
        4. Injectable: 3-month (Depo-Provera)
        5. Patch (Ortho Evra)
        6. Vaginal ring (NuvaRing)
        7. Diaphram
        8. Cervical cap, Lea's Shield or FemCap
        9. Sponge (Today)
        10. Male condom
        11. Female condom
        12. Spermicides
        13. Natural family planning (NFP) instruction (Specify NFP methods offered:_____________)
        14. Emergency contraception: Preven, Plan B
        15. Emergency contraception: Concentrated doses of OC's
        16. Female sterilization: Tubal ligation
        17. Female sterilization: Tubal occlusion (Essure)
        18. Vasectomy
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Family planning clinics are considered to offer emergency contraception onsite if they report offering either Plan B, Preven, or a concentrated dose of oral contraceptives for emergency contraception to clients onsite.

        The Guttmacher Institute conducts a periodic survey of agencies and clinics providing subsidized family planning services in the United States and its jurisdictions. Data for this objective are derived from the periodic survey of family planning clinics (including Title X-funded clinics, health departments, hospitals, community health centers, independent clinics, and Planned Parenthood clinics).

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 09-05 in that the Healthy People 2010 objective focused on family planning agencies which this objective focuses on family planning clinics. A family planning agency may oversee a number of clinics, but the clinic is where services are provided to clients. It is important that a full-range of contraceptive methods be available to clients at the clinic-level where they receive their reproductive health services. The objective has also been revised to clarify that the data source focuses specifically on publicly funded family planning clinics.
  • FP-4 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of health insurance plans that cover contraceptive supplies and services

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    *** Missing ***

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2014, FP-4 was archived without data.The primary reason this objective was archived is due to a lack of viable data source. The Guttmacher Institute initially collected this data in the Guttmacher Survey of Contraceptive Coverage in 1993 and the Guttmacher Survey of Contraceptive Coverage in 2002. However, the Guttmacher Institute no longer plans to collect this data in part because of the Women’s Preventive Services Provision of the Affordable Care Act. Under the Affordable Care Act, women’s preventive health care generally must be covered by health plans with no cost sharing. The relevant type of preventive service requires that all Food and Drug Administration approved contraceptive methods, sterilization procedures, and patient education and counseling for all women with reproductive capacity.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Sonfield, A.; Gold, R.; Darroch, J. U.S. Insurance Coverage of Contraceptives and the Impact of Contraceptive Coverage Mandates, 2002. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2004, 36(2): 72-79.
    2. The Alan Guttmacher Institute. Uneven and Unequal: Insurance Coverage and Reproductive Health Services. New York, NY: the Institute, 1994, 1-38.
  • FP-5 Reduce the proportion of pregnancies conceived within 18 months of a previous birth

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Survey of Family Growth
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    33.1 (2006–10)
    Target: 
    29.8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of females aged 15 to 44 years whose most recent pregnancy was conceived within 18 months of a previous live birth

    Denominator: 

    Number of females aged 15 to 44 years with at least two pregnancies

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      [If a current pregnancy:] How many weeks or months pregnant are you now?

      [If a completed pregnancy:] How many months or weeks had you been pregnant when (the baby was born / that pregnancy ended)?

      -Pregnancy conception date for the most recent pregnancy is defined by DATECON, a recode constructed from DATEND and PRGLNGTH for completed pregnancies and date of interview and PRGLNGTH for current pregnancies.

      [NUMERATOR and DENOMINATOR:]

      -Total number of pregnancies [PREGNUM recode based on the question below]

      (Including this pregnancy,) how many times have you been pregnant in your life?

      -Century Month for Pregnancy End Date (including live birth) [DATEND recode based on the question below]

      In what month and year (did this pregnancy end / was this baby born)?

      -Gestational length of pregnancy (in weeks) [PRGLNGTH recode, defined for both current and completed pregnancies]

      -For each pregnancy, a recode OUTCOME is defined to indicate pregnancy outcome as shown below:

      1. Live birth
      2. Induced Abortion
      3. Still birth
      4. Miscarriage
      5. Ectopic pregnancy
      6. Current pregnancy
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      A female is considered to have had a pregnancy within 18 months of a previous birth if she had at least 2 pregnancies and the 2nd most previous pregnancy ended in a live birth. The most recent pregnancy can be a current pregnancy.

      The interval between the most recent pregnancy and previous live birth is derived from the delivery date of the live birth and the date of conception for the most recent pregnancy’s conception.

    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    The objective has been revised since Healthy People 2010 to be consistent with the recommendations from the research literature. The 2010 objective measured spacing between two consecutive births, however the research literature frames the recommendation in terms of spacing between a birth and the next pregnancy. To be consistent, the objective has been revised to focus on birth-to-pregnancy spacing.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 35.3 to 33.1 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 31.7 to 29.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • FP-6 Increase the proportion of females at risk of unintended pregnancy or their partners who used contraception at most recent sexual intercourse

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Survey of Family Growth
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    83.3 (2006–10)
    Target: 
    91.6
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of at-risk females aged 15 to 44 years who currently use a method of contraception other than withdrawal and who used a method at last sex other than withdrawal

    Denominator: 

    Number of at-risk females aged 15 to 44 years who had sex in the month of interview

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Please write the methods you used each month on the calendar. I need to know about all the methods you used, so if you used more than one method, please write down all methods you used that month.

      Recode CONSTAT1 measure the current contraceptive status as of the month
      of the interview or “current month.”

      1. Female sterilization
      2. Male sterilization
      3. Norplant or Implanon implant
      4. Lunelle (injectable)
      5. Depo-Provera (injectable)
      6. Pill
      7. Contraceptive Patch
      8. Contraceptive Ring
      9. Morning-after pill
      10. IUD
      11. Diaphragm (with or w/out jelly or cream)
      12. (Male) Condom
      13. Foam
      14. Today(TM) Sponge
      15. Suppository or insert
      16. Jelly or cream (not with diaphragm)
      17. Periodic abstinence: NFP, cervical mucus test or temperature rhythm
      18. Periodic abstinence: calendar rhythm
      19. Withdrawal
      20. Other method
      21. Pregnant
      22. Seeking Pregnancy
      23. Postpartum
      24. Sterile--nonsurgical--female
      25. Sterile--nonsurgical--male
      26. Sterile--surgical--female (noncontraceptive)
      27. Sterile--surgical--male (noncontraceptive)
      28. Sterile--unknown reasons-male
      29. Other nonuser--never had intercourse since first period
      30. Other nonuser--has had intercourse, but not in the 3 months prior to interview
      31. Other nonuser--had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview
        Birth control pills

      [DENOMINATOR:]

      Is the reason you are not using a method of birth control now because you, yourself, want to become pregnant as soon as possible?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know

      Many women have times when they are not having intercourse at all, for example, because of pregnancy, separation, not dating anyone, illness, or other reasons. Since (Date), have there been any times when you were not having intercourse at all for one month or more?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      What months and years were those?

      __________

      Date of last (or more recent) sexual intercourse

      __________

      Century month of interview date

      __________

      Recode mthuse3 measures whether used any contraceptive method at last sex in past 3 mos

      __________

      Looking at Card 33, the (last) time you had intercourse with [LAST PARTNER IN PAST 12 MONTHS] in [DATE], did you or he use any method?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Type of sterilization operation "in effect"

      1. Hysterectomy
      2. Vasectomy
      3. Other operation or type unknown
      4. Not surgically sterile

      Whether Respondent's Current Husband/Partner is Surgically Sterile at Interview

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Now I have a few more questions about your physical ability to have a(nother) baby at some time in the future.

      Some women are not physically able to have children. As far as you know, is it physically possible for you, yourself, to have a(nother) baby?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      What about (NAME OF CURRENT HUSBAND OR COHABITING PARTNER)? As far as you know, is it physically possible for him to father a baby in the future?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Century Month for respondent's most recent completed pregnancy

      __________

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      “At risk of unintended pregnancy” females are those who had intercourse in the 3 months prior to the survey, who were not pregnant, nor seeking pregnancy, nor (themselves or partners) surgically or nonsurgically sterile.

      “Used contraception at most recent sexual intercourse” refers to use of any contraceptive method other than withdrawal or the contraceptive ring for women who last had intercourse in the month of interview.

      An unintended pregnancy is one that was not wanted at the time of conception or not wanted at all.

    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    The objective has been revised since Healthy People 2010 to focus specifically on the need for consistent contraceptive use. Rather than focus only on whether or not sexually active women ages 15-44 had used contraception at the month of interview, the revised objective also includes whether these current contraceptors used a method at their most recent sexual intercourse.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 83.0 to 83.3 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 91.3 to 91.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the methodology notes were updated to clarify the specific contraception measured in the objective.
  • FP-7 Increase the proportion of sexually experienced persons who received reproductive health services

    • FP-7.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 15 to 44 years who received reproductive health services in the past 12 months
      LHI

      Leading Health Indicators are a subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives selected to communicate high-priority health issues.

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      78.6 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      86.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually active females ages 15 to 44 years who reported receiving at least one of the family planning/reproductive health services listed below in the last 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually active females ages 15 to 44 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (In the past 12 months, have you received) A method of birth control or a prescription for a method? (BTHCON12)"

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you received) A check-up or medical test related to using a birth control method? (MEDTST12)

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you received) Counseling or information about getting sterilized? (STCNS12

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you received) Counseling or information about Emergency contraception or the “Morning-after pill”? (ECCNS12)

        1. Yes
        2. No

        [You may have already told me, but] in the past 12 months have you received a pregnancy test? (PRGTST12)

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months have you received) A Pap smear? (PAP12)

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months have you received) A pelvic exam? (PELVIC12) (PAP12)

        1. Yes
        2. No

        In the past 12 months, have you received counseling for, or been tested or treated for a sexually transmitted disease? (STDSVC12)

        1. Yes
        2. No
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Leading Health Indicator:
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have received reproductive health services if they reported receiving at least one of the following services in the last 12 months: a birth control method; birth control counseling; birth control checkup or test; sterilization counseling; emergency contraception counseling; pelvic exam; pap smear; pregnancy test; and STD counseling, testing, or treatment. Sexually active refers to females who have had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 78.8 to 78.6 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 86.7 to 86.5 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the objective wording was changed from sexually experienced to sexually active to more accurately reflect the data.
    • FP-7.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active males aged 15 to 44 years who received reproductive health services

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      14.8 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      16.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually active males ages 15 to 44 years who reported receiving at least one of the family planning/reproductive health services listed below in the last 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually active males ages 15 to 44 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (In the past 12 months, have you...) Received advice or counseling from a doctor or other medical care provider about using birth control methods?"

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you...) Received advice or counseling from a doctor or other medical care provider about using female methods of birth control?"

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you...) Received advice or counseling from a doctor or other medical care provider about using male methods of birth control (condoms or vasectomy)?

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you...) Received advice or counseling from a doctor or other medical care provider about getting surgically sterilized?

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you...) Received advice or counseling from a doctor or other medical care provider about sexually transmitted infections other than HIV, such as gonorrhea, Chlamydia, syphilis, or genital herpes?

        1. Yes
        2. No

        (In the past 12 months, have you...) Received advice or counseling from a doctor or other medical care provider about HIV or AIDS?

        1. Yes
        2. No
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have received a reproductive health service if they received at least one of the following services in the last 12 months: birth control advice or counseling about female methods of birth control, birth control advice or counseling about male methods of birth control, sterilization advice, STD advice, or HIV advice. Sexually active refers to males who have had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 14.9 to 14.8 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 16.4 to 16.3 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the wording was changed from sexually experienced to sexually active to more accurately reflect the data.
  • FP-8 Reduce pregnancies among adolescent females

    • FP-8.1 Reduce pregnancies among adolescent females aged 15 to 17 years

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Survey
      Surveillance Data for Abortion
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Survey of Family Growth
      National Vital Statistics System-Natality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 1,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      40.2 (2005)
      Target: 
      36.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of pregnancies among females aged 15 to 17 years

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 17 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Adolescent pregnancies are the sum of all U.S. resident live births, induced abortions, and fetal losses to females aged 15 to 17 years.

        Data on live births are counts of all births to U.S. residents occurring in the United States. Estimates of induced abortion are based on reports by CDC and The Guttmacher Institute. The Guttmacher Institute’s national estimates of abortions, based on surveys it conducts of all known abortion providers, are distributed by age and race according to estimates prepared by CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), based on reports of induced abortions from selected State health departments.

        Fetal losses refer to pregnancies that end in miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective from Healthy People 2010 has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The revision created two objectives, FP-8.1 focused on 15-17 year olds, and FP-8.2 focused on 18-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on reducing the rate of adolescent pregnancy, rather than the actual number of adolescent pregnancies.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Ventura SJ, Curtin SC, Abma JC, Henshaw SK. Estimated pregnancy rates and rates of pregnancy outcomes for the United States, 1990-2008. National vital statistics reports; vol 60 no 7. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2012.
    • FP-8.2 Reduce pregnancies among adolescent females aged 18 to 19 years

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Survey
      Surveillance Data for Abortion
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Survey of Family Growth
      National Vital Statistics System-Natality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 1,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      116.2 (2005)
      Target: 
      104.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of pregnancies among females aged 18 to 19 years

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 18 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Adolescent pregnancies are the sum of all U.S. resident live births, induced abortions, and fetal losses to females aged 18 to 19 years.

        Data on live births are counts of all births to U.S. residents occurring in the United States. Estimates of induced abortions are based on reports by CDC and The Guttmacher Institute. The Guttmacher Institute’s national estimates of abortions, based on surveys it conducts of all known abortion providers, are distributed by age and race according to estimates prepared by CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), based on reports of induced abortions from selected State health departments.

        Fetal losses refer to pregnancies that end in miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective from Healthy People 2010 has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The revision created two objectives, FP-8.1 focused on 15-17 year olds, and FP-8.2 focused on 18-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on reducing the rate of adolescent pregnancy, rather than the actual number of adolescent pregnancies.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. The target was revised from 105.9 pregnancies per thousand to 104.6 pregnancies per thousand because the original target did not correctly represent the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Ventura SJ, Curtin SC, Abma JC, Henshaw SK. Estimated pregnancy rates and rates of pregnancy outcomes for the United States, 1990-2008. National vital statistics reports; vol 60 no 7. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2012.
  • FP-9 Increase the proportion of adolescents aged 17 years and under who have never had sexual intercourse

    • FP-9.1 Increase the proportion of female adolescents aged 15 to 17 years who have never had sexual intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      72.9 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      80.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 17 years who had never had sexual intercourse with a male

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 17 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        At any time in your life, have you ever had sexual intercourse with a man, that is, made love, had sex, or gone all the way?

        1. Yes
        2. No
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 72.1 to 72.9 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 79.3 to 80.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-9.2 Increase the proportion of male adolescents aged 15 to 17 years who have never had sexual intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      72.0 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      79.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 17 years who had never had sexual intercourse with a female

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 17 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        At any time in your life, have you ever had sexual intercourse with a woman, that is, made love, had sex, or gone all the way?

        1. Yes
        2. No
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 71.2 to 72.0 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 78.3 to 79.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-9.3 Increase the proportion of female adolescents aged 15 years and under who had never had sexual intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      85.4 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      93.9
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of females aged 15 years who had never had sexual intercourse with a male

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        At any time in your life, have you ever had sexual intercourse with a man, that is, made love, had sex, or gone all the way?

        1. Yes
        2. No
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This revised objective is better able to measure the same constructs that were measured in Healthy People 2010, but will provide a better measure for adolescent abstinence before age 15 by using reports of current behavior rather than relying on recall data.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 82.9 to 85.4 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 91.2 to 93.9 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-9.4 Increase the proportion of male adolescents aged 15 years and under who had never had sexual intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      84.3 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      92.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of males aged 15 years who had never had sexual intercourse with a female

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next section is about relationships with females. Have you ever had sexual intercourse with a female (sometimes this is called making love, having sex, or going all the way)?

        1. Yes
        2. No
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This revised objective is better able to measure the same constructs that were measured in Healthy People 2010, but will provide a better measure for adolescent abstinence before age 15 by using reports of current behavior rather than relying on recall data.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 82.0 to 84.3 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 90.2 to 92.7 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • FP-10 Increase the proportion of sexually active persons aged 15 to 19 years who use condoms to both prevent pregnancy and provide barrier protection against disease

    • FP-10.1 Increase the proportion of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at first intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      68.0 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      74.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 19 years whose partner used a condom at their first intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        What is your current marital status? Are you...

        1. Married
        2. Widowed
        3. Divorced
        4. Separated, because you and your husband are not getting along
        5. Have you never been married?

        [Following a series of questions on when sexual intercourse with a man occurred and whether or not the sexual intercourse was voluntary:]

        The very first time you ever used a birth control method, which method did you use? If you used more than one method that first time, please tell me about it.

        1. Birth control pills
        2. Condom
        3. Partner’s vasectomy
        4. Diaphragm
        5. Foam
        6. Jelly or cream
        7. Cervical cap
        8. Suppository, insert
        9. Today sponge
        10. Female condom, vaginal pouch
        11. IUD, Coil, Loop
        12. Norplant
        13. Depo-provera, Injectables
        14. Morning after pill
        15. Rhythm or safe period by calendar
        16. Safe period by temperature, or cervical mucus test, natural family planning
        17. Withdrawal, pulling out
        18. Respondent sterile
        19. Partner sterile
        20. Other method (specify)

        Thinking again of the very first time you used a method of birth control, was it the first time you had intercourse?

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have used a condom at first intercourse if they reported they were sexually experienced and that their partner used a condom at their first intercourse. Sexually experienced refers to females aged 15 to 19 years who had ever had intercourse.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 66.9 to 68.0 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 73.6 to 74.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the objective wording was updated from sexually active to sexually experienced to more accurately reflect the data.
    • FP-10.2 Increase the proportion of sexually experienced males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at first intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      79.6 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      87.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually experienced males aged 15 to 19 years who used a condom at first intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually experienced males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Have you ever had sexual intercourse with a female (sometimes this is called “making love,” “having sex” or “going all the way”)?

        That first time that you had sexual intercourse with (partner’s name / your first partner), did you or she use any methods to prevent pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease?

        What method did you use?

        1. Condom or rubber
        2. Withdrawal or pulling out
        3. Vasectomy or male sterilization
        4. Pill
        5. Female sterilization
        6. Injection (Depo-Provera or Lunelle)
        7. Spermicidal foam/jelly/cream/film/suppository
        8. Hormonal implant (Norplant or Implanon)
        9. Rhythm or safe period
        10. Contraceptive patch
        11. Vaginal contraceptive ring
        12. Something else
        13. (“IUD, coil, or loop” was added in 2007)
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have used a condom at first intercourse if they reported they were sexually experienced and used a condom at their first intercourse. Sexually experienced refers to males aged 15 to 19 years who had ever had intercourse.

        Sexually experienced refers to males aged 15 to 19 years who had ever had intercourse.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 80.6 to 79.6 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 88.6 to 87.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the objective wording was updated from sexually active to sexually experienced to more accurately reflect the data.
    • FP-10.3 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at last intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      50.5 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      55.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who used a condom at last intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have used a condom at last intercourse if they reported they were sexually active and partner used a condom at their last intercourse.

        Sexually active refers to females who have had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      IN 2012, the original baseline was revised from 52.8 to 50.5 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 58.1 to 55.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-10.4 Increase the proportion of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom at last intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      74.1 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      81.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who used a condom at last intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have used a condom at last intercourse if they reported they were sexually active and used a condom at their last intercourse.

        Sexually active refers to males who have had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 77.9 to 74.1 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 85.7 to 81.5 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • FP-11 Increase the proportion of sexually active persons aged 15 to 19 years who use condoms and hormonal or intrauterine contraception to both prevent pregnancy and provide barrier protection against disease

    • FP-11.1 Increase the proportion of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and hormonal contraception at first intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      14.0 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      15.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 19 years who used a condom and hormonal contraception at first intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have used a condom and hormonal method at first intercourse if they reported they were sexually experienced; partner used a condom, and they used either birth control pills, hormonal injection, hormonal implants, or emergency contraception at their first intercourse.

        Sexually experienced refers to females aged 15 to 19 years who had ever had intercourse.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 13.4 to 14.0 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 14.8 to 15.4 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the objective wording was updated from sexually active to sexually experienced to more accurately reflect the data. In 2019, the objective text, numerator and methodology notes were updated to clarify the hormonal contraception measured in the objective.
    • FP-11.2 Increase the proportion of sexually experienced males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and whose partner used hormonal contraception at first intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      15.7 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      17.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually experienced males aged 15 to 19 years who used a condom and hormonal contraception at first intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually experienced males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have used a condom and whose partner used birth control pills, hormonal injectables, or hormonal implants at first intercourse if they reported they were sexually experienced; used a condom; and their partner used either birth control pills, hormonal injections, or hormonal implants, at their first intercourse.

        Sexually experienced refers to males aged 15 to 19 years who had ever had intercourse.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 18.1 to 15.7 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 19.9 to 17.3 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the objective wording was updated from sexually active to sexually experienced to more accurately reflect the data. In 2019, the objective text, numerator, and methodology notes were updated to clarify the hormonal contraception measured in the objective.
    • FP-11.3 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and hormonal contraception at last intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      18.3 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      20.1
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years who used a condom and hormonal method at last intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually active females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have used a condom and hormonal method at last intercourse if they reported they were sexually active; partner used a condom and they used either birth control pills, hormonal injections, hormonal implants, or emergency contraception at their last intercourse.

        Sexually active refers to females who have had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 18.4 to 18.3 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 20.2 to 20.1 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the objective text, numerator, and methodology notes were updated to clarify the hormonal contraception measured in the objective.
    • FP-11.4 Increase the proportion of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who use a condom and whose partner used hormonal contraception at last intercourse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      32.1 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      35.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years who used a condom and hormonal method at last intercourse

      Denominator: 

      Number of sexually active males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have used a condom and hormonal method at last intercourse if they reported they were sexually active; used a condom; and their partner used either pills, hormonal injections, or hormonal implants at their last intercourse.

        Sexually active refers to males who have had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      The objective has been revised to expand the age range covered by the objective from 15-17 year olds to 15-19 year olds. The objective has also been revised to focus on all sexually active adolescents, rather than only unmarried adolescents.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 33.0 to 32.1 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 36.3 to 35.3 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2019, the objective text, numerator, and methodology notes were updated to clarify the hormonal contraception measured in the objective.
  • FP-12 Increase the proportion of adolescents who received formal instruction on reproductive health topics before they were 18 years old

    • FP-12.1 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on abstinence before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      88.7 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      97.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who report having had formal instruction, before turning age 18 years, about how to say no to sex

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Now I'm interested in knowing about formal sex education you may have had. (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about how to say no to sex?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't Know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have received formal instructions on abstinence before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 87.2 to 88.7 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 95.9 to 97.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-12.2 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on abstinence before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      82.5 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      90.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Males aged 15 to 19 years who report having had formal instruction, before turning age 18 years, about how to say no to sex

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Now I'm interested in knowing about formal sex education you may have had. (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about how to say no to sex?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't Know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have received formal instructions on abstinence before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 81.1 to 82.5 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 89.2 to 90.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-12.3 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on birth control methods before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      70.5 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      77.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who report having had formal instruction, before turning age 18 years about birth control methods

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about methods of birth control?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't Know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have received formal instruction on birth control methods before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 69.5 to 70.5 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 76.4 to 77.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-12.4 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on birth control methods before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      60.8 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      66.9
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Males aged 15 to 19 years who report having had formal instruction before turning 18 about birth control methods

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about methods of birth control?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't Know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have received formal instruction on birth control methods before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 61.9 to 60.8 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 68.1 to 66.9 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-12.5 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      89.3 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      98.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 who reported having had formal instruction before turning age 18 years about how to prevent HIV/AIDS

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about how to prevent HIV/AIDS?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have received formal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 88.3 to 89.3 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 97.2 to 98.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-12.6 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      87.9 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      96.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Males aged 15 to 19 who reported having had formal instruction before turning age 18 years about how to prevent HIV/AIDS

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about how to prevent HIV/AIDS?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have received formal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 89.0 to 87.9 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 97.9 to 96.7 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-12.7 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who received formal instruction on sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      93.8 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      95.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      2 percentage point improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who reported having had formal instruction before turning age 18 years about sexually transmitted disease

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about sexually transmitted diseases?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't Know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have received formal instruction on STDs before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 93.2 to 93.8 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 95.2 to 95.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-12.8 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who received formal instruction on sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      91.8 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      93.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      2 percentage point improvement
      Numerator: 

      Males aged 15 to 19 years who reported having had formal instructions before turning age 18 years about sexually transmitted disease

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        (Before you were 18, did / Have) you ever (have / had) any formal instruction at school, church, a community center or some other place about sexually transmitted diseases?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't Know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered to have received formal instruction on STDs before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the Numerator question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 92.2 to 91.8 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 94.2 to 93.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • FP-13 Increase the proportion of adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics before they were 18 years old

    • FP-13.1 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about abstinence before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      61.4 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      67.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who reported talking with a parent or guardian about how to say no to sex

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered as having received informal instruction if they report they talked with a parent or guardian about how to say no to sex.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 63.1 to 61.4 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 69.4 to 67.5 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-13.2 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about abstinence before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      41.2 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      45.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Males aged 15 to 19 years who reported talking with a parent or guardian, before turning age 18 years about how to say no to sex

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered as having received informal instruction on abstinence if they report they talked with a parent or guardian about how to say no to sex.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 41.8 to 41.2 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 45.9 to 45.3 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-13.3 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about birth control methods before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      51.0 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      56.1
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who reported talking to a parent or guardian about methods of birth control

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered as having received informal instruction if they report they talked with a parent or guardian about methods of birth control.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, the original baseline was revised from 50.5 to 51.0 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 55.6 to 56.1 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-13.4 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about birth control methods before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      29.2 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      32.1
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who reported talking to a parent or guardian about methods of birth control

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered as having received informal instruction if they report they talked with a parent or guardian about methods of birth control.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 30.6 to 29.2 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 33.6 to 32.1 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-13.5 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      40.9 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      45.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who reported talking with a parent or guardian about how to prevent HIV/AIDS

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have received informal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the HIV/AIDS prevention question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 55.2 to 40.9 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 60.7 to 45.0 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-13.6 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about HIV/AIDS prevention before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      37.8 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      41.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Males aged 15 to 19 who reported talking with a parent or guardian about how to prevent HIV/AIDS

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered to have received informal instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention before turning age 18 years if they responded yes to the HIV/AIDS prevention question.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 49.3 to 37.8 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 54.3 to 41.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-13.7 Increase the proportion of female adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      54.2 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      59.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Females aged 15 to 19 years who reported talking with a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Females are considered as having received informal instruction if they report they talked with a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 55.2 to 54.2 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 60.7 to 59.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
    • FP-13.8 Increase the proportion of male adolescents who talked to a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases before they were 18 years old

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      48.1 (2006–10)
      Target: 
      52.9
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Males aged 15 to 19 years who reported talking with a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 15 to 19 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Survey of Family Growth:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about how you learned about sex and birth control. (Before you were 18 years old), which, if any, of the topics shown on Card 23 did you ever talk with a parent or guardian about?

        1. How to say no to sex
        2. Methods of birth control
        3. Where to get birth control
        4. Sexually transmitted diseases
        5. How to prevent HIV/AIDS
        6. How to use a condom
        7. None of the above
        8. Refused
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Males are considered as having received informal instruction if they report they talked with a parent or guardian about sexually transmitted diseases.

        Formal instruction is defined as having received formal instruction at school, church, a community center, or some other place; and informal instruction is defined as having talked to a parent or guardian about reproductive health topics.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 38.5 to 48.1 due to a change in the baseline year from 2006-2008 to 2006-2010. The target was adjusted from 42.3 to 52.9 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • FP-14 Increase the number of States that set the income eligibility level for Medicaid-covered family planning services to at least the same level used to determine eligibility for Medicaid-covered, prenancy-related care

    • FP-14.1 Increase the number of States that set the income eligibility level for Medicaid-covered family planning services at or above 133% of the poverty threshold

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Medicaid Family Planning Eligibility Expansions
      Medicaid Income Eligibility Limits for Adults
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Baseline (Year): 
      41 (2015)
      Target: 
      51
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Total coverage
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The original purpose and policy goal of the Affordable Care Act is for all 50 States and the District of Columbia provide coverage for individuals up to 133% of the poverty level through Medicaid expansions. Although only 29 States have adopted Medicaid expansions, 40 provide coverage for family planning through 1115 waivers or State Plan Amendment. Discussion is ongoing within States who do not currently provide coverage about covering family planning because of the demonstrated cost savings by providing publicly funded family planning. Thus a total coverage goal is recommended for HP2020.
      Numerator: 

      The number of States in which the income-eligibility level for Medicaid-funded family planning services is at or above 133% of the poverty threshold

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The original objective statement for FP-14 was to “Increase the number of States that set the income eligibility level for Medicaid-covered family planning services to at least the same level used to determine eligibility for Medicaid-covered, pregnancy-related care.” In 2015, this objective was split into two measures to respond to health systems changes resulting from the passage of the Affordable Care Act. FP-14.1 monitors the number of States setting the income-eligibility for Medicaid-covered family planning services at or above 133% of the poverty threshold. FP-14.2 monitors the number of States with income-eligibility at or above 185%.
    • FP-14.2 Increase the number of States that set the income eligibility level for Medicaid-covered family planning services at or above 185% of the poverty threshold

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Medicaid Family Planning Eligibility Expansions
      Medicaid Income Eligibility Limits for Adults
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Baseline (Year): 
      22 (2015)
      Target: 
      24
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of States in which the income-eligibility level for Medicaid-funded family planning services is at or above 185% of the poverty threshold

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The original objective statement for FP-14 was to “Increase the number of States that set the income eligibility level for Medicaid-covered family planning services to at least the same level used to determine eligibility for Medicaid-covered, pregnancy-related care.” In 2015, this objective was split into two measures to respond to health systems changes resulting from the passage of the Affordable Care Act. FP-14.1 monitors the number of States setting the income-eligibility for Medicaid-covered family planning services at or above 133% of the poverty threshold. FP-14.2 monitors the number of States with income-eligibility at or above 185%. The target was revised from 23 states to 24 states because the original target did not correctly represent the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.
  • FP-15 Increase the proportion of females in need of publicly supported contraceptive services and supplies who receive those services and supplies

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Guttmacher Institute Contraceptive Needs and Services
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    53.8 (2006)
    Target: 
    64.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Health care reform legislation calls for an increase in the number of Americans who have access to and receive needed medical services, including family planning services. Also, the Health Resources and Services Administration has significantly increased funding for community health centers. A 20-percent improvement is proposed.
    Numerator: 

    Number of females ages 13-44 receiving public-sector contraceptive services

    Denominator: 

    Number of females ages 13-44 in need of publicly supported contraceptive services and supplies

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2006 Current Population Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Which category represents (your/name of reference person/the total combined income)(total combined income during the past 12 months?/ of all members of your FAMILY during the past 12 months?/ of all members of (name of reference person)'s FAMILY during the past 12 months?)

      This includes money from jobs, net income from business, farm or rent, pensions, dividends, interest, social security payments and any other money income received ( by members of (your/ name of reference person) FAMILY who are 15 years of age or older.)

      1. Less than $5,000
      2. 5,000 to 7,499
      3. 7,500 to 9,999
      4. 10,000 to 12,499
      5. 12,500 to 14,999
      6. 15,000 to 19,999
      7. 20,000 to 24,999
      8. 25,000 to 29,999
      9. 30,000 to 34,999
      10. 35,000 to 39,999
      11. 40,000 to 49,999
      12. 50,000 to 59,999
      13. 60,000 to 74,999
      14. 75,000 to 99,999
      15. 100,000 to 149,999
      16. 150,000 or more

      From the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth:

      At any time in your life, have you ever had sexual intercourse with a man, that is, made love, had sex, or gone all the way?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Not Ascertained
      4. Don't Know
      5. Refused

      Fecundity status:

      1. Surgically Sterile, Contraceptive
      2. Surgically Sterile, Noncontraceptive
      3. Sterile, Nonsurgical
      4. Subfecund
      5. Long Interval (Infertile for 36+ months)
      6. Fecund

      Are you pregnant now?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Is the reason you are not using a method of birth control now because you, yourself, want to become pregnant as soon as possible?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      The Guttmacher Institute periodically estimates the number of women in need of publicly supported contraceptive services and supplies, as well as the number of women who receive public-sector contraceptive services in the United States. Estimates of women in need of services are based on population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau; income data from the Current Population Survey (at the national level) and the Bureau of Economic Analysis (at the county level), and characteristics of women from the National Survey of Family Growth. Estimates on the number of women receiving publicly supported contraceptive services come from Guttmacher’s Census of Publicly Funding Family Planning Clinics and from the Medicaid Statistical Information System. Additional information on the methodology has been published.

      Women are defined as in need of contraceptive services and supplies during a given year if they are aged 13-44, have ever had sexual intercourse, neither they nor their partners have been sterilized, and they are neither pregnant nor trying to get pregnant.

      Women are defined as in need of publicly supported contraceptive services if they are in need of contraceptive services and are either aged 20 or older with a family income below 250% of the federal poverty level, or are younger than age 20 regardless of family income level.

      From the 2006 Bureau of Economic Analysis:

      Per capita personal income for counties is used to project county level income changes between census years, as adjusted by state level income changes documented by the Current Population Survey BEA : Regional Economic Accounts - Previously Published Estimates

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Frost, J., Frohwirth, L., Blades, N., & Sonfield, A. (2009). Detailed methodology for enumerating the number of women receiving public-sector contraceptive services in 2006.
    2. Henshaw, S. & Frost, J. (2009). Detailed methodology for estimating the number of women in need of contraceptive services and supplies in 2006.
  • FP-16 Increase the percentage of women aged 15 to 44 years that adopt or continue use of the most effective or moderately effective methods of contraception

    • FP-16.1 Increase the percentage of adult females aged 20 to 44 years who are at risk of unintended pregnancy that adopt or continue use of the most effective or moderately effective methods of contraception

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      61.2 (2011–15)
      Target: 
      69.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of women aged 20-44 years who were currently using the most effective or moderately effective methods of contraception.

      Denominator: 

      Women aged 20-44 years who are at risk of unintended pregnancy

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        The most effective methods of contraception are male or female sterilization, implants, intrauterine devices or systems (IUD/IUS). Moderately effective methods of contraception are injectables, oral pills, patch, ring, or diaphragm. At risk of unintended pregnancy is defined as women who have ever had sex, are fecund, or are neither pregnant nor seeking pregnancy.

        The National Survey of Family Growth includes an extensive battery of questions to ascertain whether a woman is currently sexually active, her fucundity status, pregnancy status, and methods and consistency of contraceptive use. Responses to these questions are combined and recoded to determine pregnancy risk and use of effective contraceptive methods. More information about these recodes is available at: 2011-13 NSFG Female Respondent File Recode Specifications.

        The following recodes were used for this objective:

        HADSEX: Whether respondent has ever had sexual intercourse with a female (Recode). Yes, No.

        AGER: Respondent age at interview (Recode): 15-44

        CONSTAT1-CONSTAT4: Current contraceptive status (Recode). Where CONSTAT1 are the 1st priority codes, CONSTAT2 are the 2nd priority codes, etc. The categories of CONSTAT1-CONSTAT4 are:

        1. Female sterilization
        2. Male sterilization
        3. Norplant® or Implanon® implant
        4. Depo-Provera (injectable)
        5. Pill
        6. Contraceptive Patch
        7. Contraceptive Ring
        8. Morning-after pill
        9. IUD
        10. Diaphragm (with or w/out jelly or cream)
        11. (Male) Condom
        12. Foam
        13. Today™ Sponge
        14. Suppository or insert
        15. Jelly or cream (not with diaphragm)
        16. Periodic abstinence: NFP, cervical mucus test or temperature rhythm
        17. Periodic abstinence: calendar rhythm
        18. Withdrawal
        19. Other method
        20. Pregnant
        21. Seeking Pregnancy
        22. Postpartum
        23. Sterile—nonsurgical—female
        24. Sterile—nonsurgical—male
        25. Sterile—surgical—female (noncontraceptive)
        26. Sterile—surgical—male (noncontraceptive)
        27. Sterile—unknown reasons—male
        28. Other nonuser—never had intercourse since first period
        29. Other nonuser—has had intercourse, but not in the 3 months prior to interview
        30. Other nonuser—had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2015, this objective was added as a new measurable objective for the Family Planning topic area.
    • FP-16.2 Increase the percentage of adolescent females aged 15 to 19 years who are at risk of unintended pregnancy that adopt or continue use of the most effective or moderately effective methods of contraception

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey of Family Growth
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      45.4 (2011–15)
      Target: 
      54.1
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Minimal statistical significance
      Numerator: 

      Number of females aged 15-19 years that were currently using the most effective of moderately effective methods of contraception

      Denominator: 

      Females aged 15-19 years who are at risk of unintended pregnancy

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Most effective methods of contraception are male or female sterilization, implants, intrauterine devices or systems (IUD/IUS). Moderately effective methods of contraception are injectables, oral pills, patch, ring, or diaphragm. At risk of unintended pregnancy is defined as women who have ever had sex, are fecund, or are neither pregnant nor seeking pregnancy.

        The National Survey of Family Growth includes an extensive battery of questions to ascertain whether a woman is currently sexually active, her fucundity status, pregnancy status, and methods and consistency of contraceptive use. Responses to these questions are combined and recoded to determine pregnancy risk and use of effective contraceptive methods. More information about these recodes is available at: 2011-13 NSFG Female Respondent File Recode Specifications.

        The following recodes were used for this objective:

        HADSEX: Whether respondent has ever had sexual intercourse with a female (Recode). Yes, No.

        AGER: Respondent age at interview (Recode): 15-44

        CONSTAT1-CONSTAT4: Current contraceptive status (Recode). Where CONSTAT1 are the 1st priority codes, CONSTAT2 are the 2nd priority codes, etc. The categories of CONSTAT1-CONSTAT4 are:

        1. Female sterilization
        2. Male sterilization
        3. Norplant® or Implanon® implant
        4. Depo-Provera (injectable)
        5. Pill
        6. Contraceptive Patch
        7. Contraceptive Ring
        8. Morning-after pill
        9. IUD
        10. Diaphragm (with or w/out jelly or cream)
        11. (Male) Condom
        12. Foam
        13. Today™ Sponge
        14. Suppository or insert
        15. Jelly or cream (not with diaphragm)
        16. Periodic abstinence: NFP, cervical mucus test or temperature rhythm
        17. Periodic abstinence: calendar rhythm
        18. Withdrawal
        19. Other method
        20. Pregnant
        21. Seeking Pregnancy
        22. Postpartum
        23. Sterile—nonsurgical—female
        24. Sterile—nonsurgical—male
        25. Sterile—surgical—female (noncontraceptive)
        26. Sterile—surgical—male (noncontraceptive)
        27. Sterile—unknown reasons-male
        28. Other nonuser—never had intercourse since first period
        29. Other nonuser—has had intercourse, but not in the 3 months prior to interview
        30. Other nonuser—had intercourse in the 3 months prior to interview

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2015, this objective was added as a new measurable objective for the Family Planning topic area.