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Arthritis, Osteoporosis, and Chronic Back Conditions Data Details

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  • AOCBC-1 Reduce the mean level of joint pain among adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    mean (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    5.6 (2006)
    Target: 
    5.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Level of joint pain in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who had joint symptoms in the past 30 days [Pain response on a scale of 0 – 10]

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who had joint symptoms in the past 30 days

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2006 National Health Interview Survey Arthritis Supplement:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Please think about the past 30 days, keeping in mind all of your joint pain or aching and whether or not you have taken medication. During the past 30 days, how bad was your joint pain on average? Please answer on a scale of 0 - 10 where 0 is no pain or aching and 10 is pain or aching as bad as it can be.

      [Response categories: 0 - 10]

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [If yes:] The next questions refer to your joints. Please do NOT include the back or neck. During the past 30 days, have you had any symptoms of pain, aching, or stiffness?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
    2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
    3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-2 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who experience a limitation in activity due to arthritis or joint symptoms

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    39.4 (2008)
    Target: 
    35.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who experience a limitation in activity due to arthritis or joint symptoms

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Are you now limited in any way in any of your usual activities because of arthritis or joint symptoms?

      [Response categories: 0 - 10]

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
      • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
    2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
    3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-3 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” to perform specific joint-related activities

    • AOCBC-3.1 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” to walk a quarter of a mile—about 3 city blocks

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      15.2 (2008)
      Target: 
      13.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” or “can’t do at all” to: walk a quarter of a mile—about 3 city blocks

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions ask about difficulties you may have doing certain activities because of a HEALTH PROBLEM. By "health problem" we mean any physical, mental, or emotional problem or illness (not including pregnancy).

        By yourself, and without using any special equipment, how difficult is it for you to walk a quarter of a mile - about 3 city blocks?

        1. Not at all difficult
        2. Only a little difficult
        3. Somewhat difficult
        4. Very difficult
        5. Can't do at all
        6. Do not do this activity
        7. Refused
        8. Don't know

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      Caveats and Limitations: 
      Because of the way these joint-specific questions are asked in the NHIS, a direct link between this activity and doctor-diagnosed arthritis cannot be made. However, by restricting the denominator to adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis and focusing on the proportion with a severe activity limitation (i.e., “very difficult” or “”can’t do at all”) in a function typically related to arthritis, we believe this provides an indirect but credible link that is useful for addressing the important issue physical function.
      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
    • AOCBC-3.2 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” to walk up 10 steps without resting

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      10.8 (2008)
      Target: 
      9.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” or “can’t do at all” to: walk up ten steps without resting

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions ask about difficulties you may have doing certain activities because of a HEALTH PROBLEM. By "health problem" we mean any physical, mental, or emotional problem or illness (not including pregnancy).

        By yourself, and without using any special equipment, how difficult is it for you to:

        walk up ten steps without resting?

        1. Not at all difficult
        2. Only a little difficult
        3. Somewhat difficult
        4. Very difficult
        5. Can't do at all
        6. Do not do this activity
        7. Refused
        8. Don't know

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      Caveats and Limitations: 
      Because of the way these joint-specific questions are asked in the NHIS, a direct link between this activity and doctor-diagnosed arthritis cannot be made. However, by restricting the denominator to adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis and focusing on the proportion with a severe activity limitation (i.e., “very difficult” or “can’t do at all”) in a function typically related to arthritis, we believe this provides an indirect but credible link that is useful for addressing the important issue physical function.
      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
    • AOCBC-3.3 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” to stoop, bend, or kneel

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      21.7 (2008)
      Target: 
      19.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” or “can’t do at all” to: stoop/bend/kneel

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions ask about difficulties you may have doing certain activities because of a HEALTH PROBLEM. By "health problem" we mean any physical, mental, or emotional problem or illness (not including pregnancy).

        By yourself, and without using any special equipment, how difficult is it for you to stoop, bend or kneel?

        1. Not at all difficult
        2. Only a little difficult
        3. Somewhat difficult
        4. Very difficult
        5. Can't do at all
        6. Do not do this activity
        7. Refused
        8. Don't know

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      Caveats and Limitations: 
      Because of the way these joint-specific questions are asked in the NHIS, a direct link between this activity and doctor-diagnosed arthritis cannot be made. However, by restricting the denominator to adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis and focusing on the proportion with a severe activity limitation (i.e., “very difficult” or “can’t do at all”) in a function typically related to arthritis, we believe this provides an indirect but credible link that is useful for addressing the important issue physical function.
      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
    • AOCBC-3.4 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” to use fingers to grasp or handle small objects

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      4.4 (2008)
      Target: 
      4.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who find it “very difficult” or “can’t do at all” to: use fingers to grasp or handle small objects

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions ask about difficulties you may have doing certain activities because of a HEALTH PROBLEM. By "health problem" we mean any physical, mental, or emotional problem or illness (not including pregnancy).

        By yourself, and without using any special equipment, how difficult is it for you to use fingers to grasp or handle small objects?

        1. Not at all difficult
        2. Only a little difficult
        3. Somewhat difficult
        4. Very difficult
        5. Can't do at all
        6. Do not do this activity
        7. Refused
        8. Don't know

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      Caveats and Limitations: 
      Because of the way these joint-specific questions are asked in the NHIS, a direct link between this activity and doctor-diagnosed arthritis cannot be made. However, by restricting the denominator to adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis and focusing on the proportion with a severe activity limitation (i.e., “very difficult” or “can’t do at all”) in a function typically related to arthritis, we believe this provides an indirect but credible link that is useful for addressing the important issue physical function.
      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-4 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who have difficulty in performing two or more personal care activities, thereby preserving independence

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    2.7 (2008)
    Target: 
    2.4
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who have difficulty performing two or more personal care activities

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem, {do/does} [PERSON] need the help of other persons with personal care needs, such as eating, bathing, dressing, or getting around inside this home?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [If yes:] {Do/Does} [PERSON] need the help of other persons with...

      • bathing or showering?
      • dressing?
      • eating?
      • getting in or out of bed or chairs?
      • using the toilet, including getting to the toilet?
      • getting around inside the home?

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
      • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
    2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
    3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-5 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who report serious psychological distress

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    7.3 (2008)
    Target: 
    6.6
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who reported serious psychological distress over the past 30 days [Serious psychological distress is defined as a score of 13 points or higher (on a scale of 24) based on answers to the 6 questions of the Kessler 6.]

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Now I am going to ask you some questions about feelings you may have experienced over the PAST 30 DAYS.

      During the PAST 30 DAYS, how often did you feel:

      1. ... So sad that nothing could cheer you up?
      2. ... Nervous?
      3. ... Restless or fidgety?
      4. ... Hopeless?
      5. ... That everything was an effort?
      6. ... Worthless?

      Possible responses include:

      1. ALL of the time (4 points)
      2. MOST of the time (3 points)
      3. SOME of the time (2 points)
      4. A LITTLE of the time (1 point)
      5. NONE of the time (0 points)
      6. Refused
      7. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Defining serious psychological distress using a score of 13 points or higher (on a scale of 24) based on answers to the 6 questions of the Kessler 6 is a standard definition in the field. For each participant, all 6 questions must have nonmissing data to be included.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
    2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
    3. Kessler, R. C., Barker, P. R., Colpe, L. J., Epstein, J. F., Gfroerer, J. C., Hiripi, E. (2003). Screening for Serious Mental Illness in the General Population. Archives of General Psychiatry, 60(2), 184-189.
    4. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-6 Reduce the impact of doctor-diagnosed arthritis on employment in the working-age population

    • AOCBC-6.1 Reduce the unemployment rate among adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      34.0 (2008)
      Target: 
      30.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 – 64 years with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who report being unemployed

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 -64 years with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Which of the following {were/was} [PERSON] doing last week?

        1. Working for pay at a job or business
        2. With a job or business but not at work
        3. Looking for work
        4. Working, but not for pay, at a job or business
        5. Not working at a job or business

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Persons are considered employed if they answered “yes” to “working at a job or business” or “with a job or business but not at work.”

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64
        • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64
      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2015, the original baseline was revised from 35.0 to 33.9 due to a changes in the coding of unemployment status. The target was adjusted from 31.5 to 30.5 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
    • AOCBC-6.2 Reduce the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who are limited in their ability to work for pay due to arthritis

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      33.1 (2006)
      Target: 
      29.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 - 64 years with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who are limited in their ability to work for pay due to arthritis

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 - 64 years with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Health Interview Survey Arthritis Supplement:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Do arthritis or joint symptoms now affect whether you work, the type of work you do, or the amount of work you do?

        1. Yes
        2. No

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64
        • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-7 Increase the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who receive health care provider counseling

    • AOCBC-7.1 Increase the proportion of overweight and obese adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who receive health care provider counseling for weight reduction

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      41.2 (2006)
      Target: 
      45.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis and who are overweight and obese and received health care provider counseling for weight reduction

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis and who are overweight and obese

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Health Interview Survey Arthritis Supplement:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Has a doctor or other health professional ever suggested losing weight to help your arthritis or joint symptoms?

        1. Yes
        2. No

        How tall are you without shoes?

        How much do you weigh without shoes?

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Body Mass Index (BMI) is used to determine overweight and obesity. It is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters. Overweight is defined as a BMI of 25.0 or greater and obesity is defined as a BMI of 30.0 or greater.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
    • AOCBC-7.2 Increase the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who receive health care provider counseling for physical activity or exercise

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      52.2 (2006)
      Target: 
      57.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis and who received health care provider counseling for physical activity or exercise

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 National Health Interview Survey Arthritis Supplement:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Has a doctor or other health professional ever suggested physical activity or exercise to help your arthritis or joint symptoms?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Body Mass Index (BMI) is used to determine overweight and obesity. It is calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters. Overweight is defined as a BMI of 25.0 or greater and obesity is defined as a BMI of 30.0 or greater.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
        • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
      2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
      3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-8 Increase the proportion of adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who have had effective, evidence-based arthritis education as an integral part of the management of their condition

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    10.6 (2006)
    Target: 
    11.7
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who have taken an educational course or class

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2006 National Health Interview Survey Arthritis Supplement:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Have you ever taken an educational course or class to teach you how to manage problems related to your arthritis or joint symptoms?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
    2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
    3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-9 Increase the proportion of adults with chronic joint symptoms who have seen a health care provider for their symptoms

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    72.0 (2008)
    Target: 
    79.2
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with chronic joint symptoms who saw a health care provider for their symptoms

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with chronic joint symptoms

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey Arthritis Supplement:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Have you EVER seen a doctor or other health professional for these joint symptoms?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      The next questions refer to your joints. Please do NOT include the back or neck. During the past 30 days, have you had any symptoms of pain, aching, or stiffness in or around a joint?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [yes, and:]

      Did your joint symptoms FIRST begin more than 3 months ago?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
      • Sexual Orientation: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Arthritis Foundation, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Arthritis Action Plan: A Public Health Strategy. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 1999.
    2. Arthritis Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. Atlanta, Georgia: Arthritis Foundation, 2010.
    3. United States Bone and Joint Decade: The Burden of Musculoskeletal Diseases in the United States. Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; 2008.
  • AOCBC-10 Reduce the proportion of adults with osteoporosis

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    5.9 (2005–08)
    Target: 
    5.3
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 50 years and over with a femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) value ≤ 0.56 gm/cm2

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 50 years and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Bone mineral densities are determined from measurements made as part of the NHANES battery of examinations. The choice of a femoral BMD of 0.56 or less is the measure 2.5 or more standard deviations below the reference mean for young adults aged 20 - 29 years.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Sex: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Educational Attainment: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Country of Birth: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Disability Status: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Health Insurance Status: 50-59, 60-64
      • Marital Status: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Veteran Status: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Obesity Status: 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Looker, A.C.; Orwoll, E.S.; Johnston; C.C.; et al. Prevalence and low femoral bone density in older U.S. adults from NHANES III. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 12:1761-8, 1997.
    2. World Health Organization (WHO). Assessment of Fracture Risk and Its Application to Screening for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis. Technical Report Series No. 843. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO, 1994.
  • AOCBC-11 Reduce hip fractures among older adults

    • AOCBC-11.1 Reduce hip fractures among females aged 65 years and older

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Discharge Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      823.5 (2007)
      Target: 
      741.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of hospitalizations for hip fractures (principal diagnosis of ICD-9-CM code 820) among females aged 65 years and over

      Denominator: 

      Number of females aged 65 years and over

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Principal diagnosis is the diagnosis chiefly responsible for admission of the person to the hospital.

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Hospital discharge rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population for rates of data year 2007, the 2007 estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Region: 65-74, 75+
        • Marital Status: 65-74, 75+
    • AOCBC-11.2 Reduce hip fractures among males aged 65 years and older

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Discharge Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      464.9 (2007)
      Target: 
      418.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of hospitalizations for hip fractures (principal ICD-9-CM code 820) among males aged 65 years and over

      Denominator: 

      Number of males aged 65 years and over

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Principal diagnosis is the diagnosis chiefly responsible for admission of the person to the hospital.

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Hospital discharge rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population for rates of data year 2007, the 2007 estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Region: 65-74, 75+
        • Marital Status: 65-74, 75+
  • AOCBC-12 Reduce activity limitation due to chronic back conditions

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 1,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    30.7 (2008)
    Target: 
    27.6
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with limitation in activity due to chronic back or neck problems

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem, {do/does} [PERSON] need the help of other persons with personal care needs, such as eating, bathing, dressing, or getting around inside this home?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [If yes:]

      {Do/Does} [PERSON] need the help of other persons with

      • bathing?
      • dressing?
      • eating?
      • getting in or out of bed or chairs?
      • using the toilet, including getting to the toilet?
      • getting around inside the house?

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem {do/does} [PERSON] need the help of other persons in handling routine needs, such as everyday household chores, doing necessary business, shopping, or getting around for other purposes?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does the physical, mental, or emotional problem keep [PERSON] from working at a job or business?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      {Are/(Other than the persons mentioned are) any of these family members} [PERSON 18+] limited in the kind OR amount of work {you/they} can do because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Because of a health problem, {do/does} {you/anyone} in the family walking without using any special equipment?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      {Are/Is} {you/anyone} in the family limited in any way in any activities because of difficulty remembering or because {you/they} experience periods of confusion?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      What conditions or health problems cause [PERSON] limitations? [Response categories include: Back or neck problem causes limitation]

      How long have you had a back or neck problem?

      • 01-94
      • 95+
      • Since birth
      • Refused
      • Don't know

      Enter time period for time with back or neck problem.

      1. Day
      2. Week(s)
      3. Month(s)
      4. Year
      5. Since Birth
      6. Refused
      7. Don't Know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      The condition is considered “chronic” if it has lasted 3 months or more.

      Persons are considered limited in activity if they respond “yes” to any of the activity limitation questions: personal care needs; routine needs; or physical, mental, or emotional problems that preclude working or limit the kind or amount of work that can be done.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Sexual Orientation: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    Caveats and Limitations: 
    The estimate for chronic back conditions includes neck problems because of the way the questionnaire was worded.
    Trend Issues: 
    Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.
  • AOCBC-13 Decrease the prevalence of adults having high impact chronic pain

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    7.5 (2016)
    Target-Setting Method: 
    This measure is being tracked for informational purposes. If warranted, a target will be set during the decade.
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults (18+) with high impact chronic pain (HICP)

    Denominator: 

    All adults (18+)

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2016 National Health Interview Survey: “In the past six months, how often did you have pain? Would you say never, some days, most days, or every day?”

      and

      "Over the past six months, how often did pain limit your life or work activities? Would you say never, some days, most days, or every day?"

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      High Impact Chronic Pain (HICP) is defined as pain on most days or every day in the past six months AND pain limiting life or work activities on most days or every day in the past six months.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Family Type: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64
      • Sexual Orientation: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-44, 45-64, 65-84, 85+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2014 this objective, along with three others, were added as new Developmental objectives for the AOCBC topic area. They appeared in the Fall/Winter public comment period, and permanently on HealthyPeople.gov in 2015. In 2019, this objective was moved from a developmental to an informational objective.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Institute of Medicine. 2011. Relieving pain in America: A blueprint for transforming prevention, care, education, and research. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.
    2. The National Pain Strategy Task Force.
  • AOCBC-14 (Developmental) Increase public awareness/knowledge of high impact chronic pain

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    *** Missing ***

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2014 this objective, along with three others, were added as new Developmental objectives for the AOCBC topic area. They appeared in the Fall/Winter public comment period, and permanently on HealthyPeople.gov in 2015.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Institute of Medicine. 2011. Relieving pain in America: A blueprint for transforming prevention, care, education, and research. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.
    2. The National Pain Strategy Task Force.
  • AOCBC-15 (Developmental) Increase self-management of high impact chronic pain

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    *** Missing ***

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2014 this objective, along with three others, were added as new Developmental objectives for the AOCBC topic area. They appeared in the Fall/Winter public comment period, and permanently on HealthyPeople.gov in 2015.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Institute of Medicine. 2011. Relieving pain in America: A blueprint for transforming prevention, care, education, and research. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.
    2. The National Pain Strategy Task Force.
  • AOCBC-16 (Developmental) Decrease the impact of high impact chronic pain on family/significant others

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    *** Missing ***

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2014 this objective, along with three others, were added as new Developmental objectives for the AOCBC topic area. They appeared in the Fall/Winter public comment period, and permanently on HealthyPeople.gov in 2015.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Institute of Medicine. 2011. Relieving pain in America: A blueprint for transforming prevention, care, education, and research. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.
    2. The National Pain Strategy Task Force.