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Sleep Health Data Details

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  • SH-1 Increase the proportion of persons with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea who seek medical evaluation

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    25.6 (2005–08)
    Target: 
    27.8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Minimal statistical significance
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    The target is the smallest improvement that results in a statistically significant difference when tested against the baseline value, assuming the same standard error for the target as for the baseline.
    Numerator: 

    Adults 20 years and over who report symptoms of sleep apnea and who have ever told a doctor that they have trouble sleeping

    Denominator: 

    Adults 20 years and over who report symptoms of sleep apnea

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      {Have you/Has SP} ever told a doctor or other health professional that {you have/s/he has} trouble sleeping?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      In the past 12 months, how often did {you/SP} snore while {you were/s/he was} sleeping?

      1. Never
      2. Rarely (1-2 nights/week)
      3. Occasionally (3-4 nights/week)
      4. Frequently (5 or more nights/week)
      5. Refused
      6. Don't know

      In the past 12 months, how often did {you/SP} snort, gasp, or stop breathing while {you were/s/he was} asleep?

      1. Never
      2. Rarely (1-2 nights/week)
      3. Occasionally (3-4 nights/week)
      4. Frequently (5 or more nights/week)
      5. Refused
      6. Don't know

      In the past month, how often did {you/SP}] feel excessively or overly sleepy during the day?

      1. Never
      2. Rarely (1 time a month)
      3. Sometimes (2-4 times a month)
      4. Often (5-15 times a month)
      5. Almost always (16-30 times a month)
      6. Refused
      7. Don't know

      How much sleep {do you/does SP} usually get at night on weekdays or workdays?

      ______ Hours

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Persons were considered to have symptoms of sleep apnea if they answered the questions listed under denominator as follows: (snoring 3 or more nights per week) OR (snort, gasp or stop breathing 3 or more nights per week) OR (feel excessively sleepy during the day almost always 16-30 times per month AND usually sleep 7 or more hours per night on weekdays or worknights).

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Sex: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Country of Birth: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Disability Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Health Insurance Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-64
      • Marital Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Veteran Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+
      • Obesity Status: 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2018, the baseline was revised from 25.5% to 25.6% due to a programming error. The target was revised from 28.0% to 27.8%, using the original target setting method of minimal statistical significance.
  • SH-2 Reduce the rate of vehicular crashes per 100 million miles traveled that are due to drowsy driving

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) General Estimates System (GES)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 100,000,000 vehicle miles traveled
    Baseline (Year): 
    2.7 (2008)
    Target: 
    2.1
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Minimal statistical significance
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    The target is the smallest improvement that results in a statistically significant difference when tested against the baseline value, assuming a relatively large standard of error of the same size as that of the baseline rate.
    Numerator: 

    Number of motor vehicle crashes involving drivers who are drowsy, sleepy, asleep, or fatigued

    Denominator: 

    Total vehicle miles traveled

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      NASS GES data are from a nationally representative sample of police-reported motor vehicle crashes. To be included, the crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a traffic way and result in property damage, injury, or death.

    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 24-12 in that the data source was modified from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System to the General Estimates System to include all crashes involving drowsy driving, not just those where there was a driver fatality. The unit of measure was also modified from the percentage of fatal crashes to the rate per vehicle miles traveled.
  • SH-3 Increase the proportion of students in grades 9 through 12 who get sufficient sleep

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    30.9 (2009)
    Target: 
    33.1
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Minimal statistical significance
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    No significant change in the estimate has occurred since 2004. The target is the smallest improvement that results in a statistically significant difference when tested against the baseline value, assuming the same standard error for the target as for the baseline.
    Numerator: 

    Students in grades 9-12 who sleep for 8 or more hours per night

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9 through 12

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      On an average school night, how many hours of sleep do you get?

      1. 4 or less hours
      2. 5 hours
      3. 6 hours
      4. 7 hours
      5. 8 hours
      6. 9 hours
      7. 10 or more hours
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Students in grades 9-12 who sleep for 8 or more hours per night

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9 through 12

    Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

        From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        On an average school night, how many hours of sleep do you get?

        1. 4 or less hours
        2. 5 hours
        3. 6 hours
        4. 7 hours
        5. 8 hours
        6. 9 hours
        7. 10 or more hours
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, the target was revised from 33.2 to 33.1 percent due to a change in the rounding rules for target calculations of Minimal Statistical Significance.
  • SH-4 Increase the proportion of adults who get sufficient sleep

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    71.6 (2008)
    Target: 
    72.8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Minimal statistical significance
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    The target is the smallest improvement that results in a statistically significant difference when tested against the baseline value, assuming the same standard error for the target as for the baseline.
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 years and over who get at least 7 hours of sleep per day

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period?

      ______ Hours

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Participants were asked how many hours they sleep during a 24-hour period. The numerator data includes those participants reporting 7 or more hours of sleep per day.

    Trend Issues: 
    Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 years and over who get at least 7 hours of sleep per day

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 and over

    Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period?

        ______ Hours

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        Participants were asked how many hours they sleep during a 24-hour period. The numerator data includes those participants reporting 7 or more hours of sleep per day.

    Trend Issues: 
    Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, the target was revised from 70.9 to 70.8 percent due to a change in the rounding rules for target calculations of Minimal Statistical Significance. In 2019, the definition of sufficient sleep during a 24 hour period was revised from 8 or more hours for adults 18 to 21 years and 7 or more hours for adults aged 22 years and over to 7 or more hours for all adults 18 years and over. The baseline value was revised from 69.6% to 71.6%. The target was revised from 70.8% to 72.8% using the original target setting method. During the development of Healthy People 2020, there were no published guidelines pertaining to the amount of sufficient sleep in adults. These changes were made to align with the 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine sleep guidelines.