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Disability and Health Data Details

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  • DH-1 Increase the number of population-based data systems used to monitor Healthy People 2020 objectives that include in their core a standardized set of questions that identify people with disabilities

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Healthy People 2020 Database
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    number
    Baseline (Year): 
    4 (2010)
    Target: 
    8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    During the decade 1999–2009, the number of HP2010 data systems that included two standard disability questions increased from zero to four. The proposed target calls for an increase from zero to eight data systems that include six disability questions.
    Numerator: 

    Number of applicable Healthy People 2020 person-level data systems that include in their core, a set of standardized questions that identify people with disabilities

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      A data system is considered “applicable” if it (1) is utilized in HP2020, (2) obtains data on individuals or families, and (3) includes in its core a set of standardized questions that identifies people with disabilities.

    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 06-01 in that the Healthy People 2010 objective defined a population-based data system with "standard" core disability questions as one that included two disability identifiers. This Healthy People 2020 objective defines a population-based data system with "standard" core disability questions as one that includes six disability identifiers.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    The baseline and target were revised October 2015. The baseline was revised from 2 to 4. The target was revised from 4 to 8. This was change was made due to an error in assessment. This objective measurement is based off of periodic assessment by staff of the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC. In 2019, the 2017 value was revised from 18 to 13. This change was made due to a data error.
  • DH-2 Increase the number of Tribes, States, and the District of Columbia that have public health surveillance and health promotion programs for people with disabilities and caregivers

    • DH-2.1 Increase the number of State and the District of Columbia health departments that have at least one health promotion program aimed at improving the health and well-being of people with disabilities

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Healthy People 2020 Database
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      number
      Baseline (Year): 
      16 (2010)
      Target: 
      18
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of states and the District of Columbia that have established health promotion programs that are linked to the state health department; have a full-time staff dedicated to improving the health and wellness of people with disabilities; and regularly and by design, include people with disabilities in statewide and state-funded "health promotion" efforts.

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        States and DC are considered to have a statewide health promotion program for people with disabilities if they meet the three criteria listed in the numerator section.

        A health promotion program is defined as a sustained and organized entity with fairly broad-reaching health interventions, services, policies, and practices. Health promotion has been defined by the World Health Organization's 2005 Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a Globalized World as "the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health". Health Promotion initiatives include consultation and public involvement, information dissemination, education and/or tools of personal skill development (e.g., Fact Sheets), building partnerships (e.g., expert advisory committees), re-orienting health services (e.g., new consumer information section in the product monograph) and strengthening community action (e.g., Diabetes strategy). When it is possible to implement non-legislative tools such as guidance documents and voluntary standards to communicate among stakeholders, health promotion is increasingly a tool which is being sought to help people increase control over and improve their health.

        States with indicated programs are determined through periodic assessment by staff of the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Good guidance practices manual. Ontario: Bureau of Policy, Science and International Programs, 2007 Oct 31. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
      2. State government. Washington, DC: United States Government.
      3. The Bangkok charter for health promotion in a globalized world [Internet]. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2005 Aug 11. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    • DH-2.2 Increase the number of State and the District of Columbia health departments that conduct health surveillance of caregivers for people with disabilities

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Baseline (Year): 
      6 (2010)
      Target: 
      51
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Retention of Healthy People 2010 target
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      When caregivers are identified in the core of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, as occurred in 2009, achieving a target of all 50 States and the District of Columbia is technically feasible. The target of total coverage is retained.
      Numerator: 

      Number of States and the District of Columbia that conduct statewide public health surveillance for caregivers

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        A state is considered to conduct statewide health surveillance of caregivers if the state's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) includes the following question: People may provide regular care or assistance to a friend or family member who has a health problem, long-term illness, or disability. During the past month, did you provide any such care or assistance to a friend or family member?

        States with indicated surveillance are determined through periodic assessment of the BRFSS questions by staff at the National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2017, the original baseline was revised from 2 to 6, for 2011 from 0 to 2, and 2012 from 0 to 10. Data were revised based on updated data availability.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
      2. State government. Washington, DC: United States Government.
    • DH-2.3 Increase the number of State and the District of Columbia health departments that have at least one health promotion program aimed at improving the health and well-being of caregivers of people with disabilities

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Healthy People 2020 Database
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      number
      Baseline (Year): 
      2010
      Target: 
      16
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Maintain consistency with national programs, regulations, policies, and laws.
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The target for this objective is consistent with the baseline number of State health promotion programs for people with disabilities (DH 2.1) who also may interface with caregivers as well as States that have support programs specifically for caregivers.
      Numerator: 

      Number of States and the District of Columbia that have established health promotion programs that are linked to the state health department; have full-time staff dedicated to improving the health and wellness of caregivers; and regularly, and by design, include caregivers in statewide and state-funded "health promotion" efforts

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        States and DC are considered to have a statewide health promotion program for caregivers if they meet the three criteria listed in the numerator section.

        A health promotion program is defined as a sustained and organized entity with fairly broad-reaching health interventions, services, policies, and practices. Health promotion has been defined by the World Health Organization's 2005 Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a Globalized World as "the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health". Health Promotion initiatives include consultation and public involvement, information dissemination, education and/or tools of personal skill development (e.g., Fact Sheets), building partnerships (e.g., expert advisory committees), re-orienting health services (e.g., new consumer information section in the product monograph) and strengthening community action (e.g., Diabetes strategy). When it is possible to implement non-legislative tools such as guidance documents and voluntary standards to communicate among stakeholders, health promotion is increasingly a tool which is being sought to help people increase control over and improve their health.

        States with indicated programs are determined through periodic assessment by staff of the National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. State government. Washington, DC: United States Government.
      2. The Bangkok charter for health promotion in a globalized world [Internet]. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2005 Aug 11. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    • DH-2.4 (Developmental) Increase the number of Tribes that conduct health surveillance for people with disabilities

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Numerator: 

      Number of Tribes that conduct public health surveillance for people with disabilities

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Tribes are considered to have a tribal surveillance program for people with disabilities if they administer the BRFSS and identify people with disabilities in the BRFSS as indicated in the numerator section above.

        There are 562 Federally recognized United States Tribes.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
      2. Indian entities recognized and eligible to receive services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs [Internet]. Washington (DC): United States Government. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.]. Available from Federal Register, Volume 74, Number 183 dated August 11, 2009 (74 FR 40218).
    • DH-2.5 (Developmental) Increase the number of Tribes that have at least one health promotion program aimed at improving the health and well-being of people with disabilities

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Numerator: 

      Number of Tribes that have health promotion programs for people with disabilities

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Tribes are considered to have a health promotion program for people with disabilities if they meet the three criteria listed the numerator section. There are 562 Federally recognized United States Tribes.

        A health promotion program is defined as a sustained and organized entity with fairly broad-reaching health interventions, services, policies, and practices. Health promotion has been defined by the World Health Organization's 2005 Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a Globalized World as "the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health". Health Promotion initiatives include consultation and public involvement, information dissemination, education and/or tools of personal skill development (e.g., Fact Sheets), building partnerships (e.g., expert advisory committees), re-orienting health services (e.g., new consumer information section in the product monograph) and strengthening community action (e.g., Diabetes strategy). When it is possible to implement non-legislative tools such as guidance documents and voluntary standards to communicate among stakeholders, health promotion is increasingly a tool which is being sought to help people increase control over and improve their health.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Indian entities recognized and eligible to receive services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs [Internet]. Washington (DC): United States Government. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.]. Available from Federal Register, Volume 74, Number 183 dated August 11, 2009 (74 FR 40218).
      2. The Bangkok charter for health promotion in a globalized world [Internet]. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2005 Aug 11. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    • DH-2.6 (Developmental) Increase the number of Tribes that conduct health surveillance of caregivers for people with disabilities

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Numerator: 

      Number of Tribes that conduct public health surveillance for caregivers

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Tribes are considered to have a tribal surveillance program for caregivers if they administer the BRFSS and identify caregivers of people with disabilities the BRFSS as indicated in the numerator section.

        There are 562 Federally recognized United States Tribes.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
      2. Indian entities recognized and eligible to receive services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs [Internet]. Washington (DC): United States Government. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.]. Available from Federal Register, Volume 74, Number 183 dated August 11, 2009 (74 FR 40218).
    • DH-2.7 (Developmental) Increase the number of Tribes that have at least one health promotion program aimed at improving the health and well-being of caregivers of people with disabilities

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Numerator: 

      Number of Tribes that have health promotion programs for caregivers

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Methodology Notes: 

        Tribes are considered to have a health promotion program for caregivers if they meet the three criteria indicated in the numerator section. There are 562 Federally recognized United States Tribes.

        A health promotion program is defined as a sustained and organized entity with fairly broad-reaching health interventions, services, policies, and practices. Health promotion has been defined by the World Health Organization's 2005 Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a Globalized World as "the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health". Health Promotion initiatives include consultation and public involvement, information dissemination, education and/or tools of personal skill development (e.g., Fact Sheets), building partnerships (e.g., expert advisory committees), re-orienting health services (e.g., new consumer information section in the product monograph) and strengthening community action (e.g., Diabetes strategy). When it is possible to implement non-legislative tools such as guidance documents and voluntary standards to communicate among stakeholders, health promotion is increasingly a tool which is being sought to help people increase control over and improve their health.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Good guidance practices manual. Ontario: Bureau of Policy, Science and International Programs, 2007 Oct 31. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
      2. Indian entities recognized and eligible to receive services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs [Internet]. Washington (DC): United States Government. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.]. Available from Federal Register, Volume 74, Number 183 dated August 11, 2009 (74 FR 40218).
      3. The Bangkok charter for health promotion in a globalized world [Internet]. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2005 Aug 11. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
  • DH-3 Increase the proportion of U.S. MPH-granting public health schools and programs that offer graduate-level studies in disability and health

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Periodic Assessment of Schools of Public Health Courses
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    50.0 (2011)
    Target: 
    55.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of accredited and associated U.S. schools of public health who offer at least one disability and health course

    Denominator: 

    Number of accredited and associated U.S. schools of public health

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      Periodic Assessment of Public Health Courses, CDC, NCBDDD

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Does your school or program now have one or more graduate-level courses dealing exclusively or nearly exclusively with disability?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does your school or program now offer other graduate-level courses that deal substantially with disability (for example, courses on aging and old age or maternal and child health)?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Do other components of your school or program's curriculum provide systematic treatments of disability? That is, more than occasional or passing references?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does your school or program offer a graduate-level track or concentration in disability?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does your school or program offer dual degree or multidisciplinary programs that highlight disability (for example, programs with physical or occupational therapy or physiatry residency programs)?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      [DENOMINATOR:]

      Accredited and Associated U.S. schools of public health (N=51)

    Methodology Notes: 

      Schools of public health are considered to offer a graduate–level disability and health course if they indicate “yes” to any of the questions listed in the numerator section.

      A school is considered to be an accredited school of public health if it is listed as indicated in the denominator section.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2015, DH-3 was moved from developmental to measurable (a baseline and target were established) and was reworded. The objective statement is: Increase the proportion of U.S. MPH-granting public health schools and programs that offer graduate-level studies in disability and health. The baseline is 50 percent in 2011. The target of 55 percent was set using the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Academic Program Finder. Washington (DC): Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health.
    2. Tanenhaus RH, Meyers AR, Harbison LA. Disability and the curriculum in US graduate schools of public health. AJPH. 2000;90(8):1315-6.
  • DH-4 Reduce the proportion of adults with disabilities aged 18 years and older who experience delays in receiving primary and periodic preventive care due to specific barriers

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    47.2 (2009)
    Target: 
    42.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of individuals with disabilities aged 18 and over who experience delays in receiving needed primary and periodic preventive care due to barriers

    Denominator: 

    Number of individuals with disabilities aged 18 and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the National Health Interview Survey, Sample Child and Sample Adult:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      There are many reasons people delay getting medical care. Have you delayed getting care for any of the following reasons in the past 12 MONTHS:

      1. Couldn't get through on the telephone.
      2. Couldn't get an appointment soon enough.
      3. Once you get there, had to wait too long to see the doctor.
      4. The office wasn't open when you could get there.
      5. Didn't have transportation.

      During the past 12 MONTHS, was there any time when he/she needed any of the following, but didn't get it because you couldn't afford:

      Prescription medicines?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Mental health care or counseling?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Dental care (including check-ups)?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Eyeglasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR (DISABILITY IDENTIFIERS):]

      1 year old or older:

      Is this person deaf or do they have serious difficulty hearing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Is this person blind or do they have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      5 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      15 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Methodology Notes: 

      Adults with disabilities are considered to experience delays in care due to barriers if they or an adult proxy responds “yes” to any of the questions listed in the numerator section. Adults with disabilities are identified in this objective if they or an adult proxy responds “yes” to questions listed in the denominator section.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2017, DH-4 target was revised to 42.5 percent using the 10 percent improvement target-setting method. In 2016, the baseline was revised from 49.5 to 47.2 due to a programming error. In 2015, DH-4 was moved from developmental to measurable (a baseline and target were established) and was reworded. The objective statement is: Reduce the proportion of adults with disabilities aged 18 years and older who experience delays in receiving primary and periodic preventive care due to specific barriers. The baseline is 49.5 percent in 2009. The target of 44.6 percent was set using the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
    2. Klein RJ, Proctor SE, Boudreault MA, Turczyn KM. Healthy people 2010 criteria for data suppression. Statistical Notes No. 24. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2002.
    3. Klein RJ, Schoenborn CA. Age adjustment using the 2000 projected U.S. population. Statistical Notes No. 20. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2001.
  • DH-5 Increase the proportion of youth with special health care needs whose health care provider has discussed transition planning from pediatric to adult health care

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    41.2 (2005–06)
    Target: 
    45.3
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs, whose health care provider has discussed transition planning into adult care

    Denominator: 

    Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2005-06 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (Section 6B. TRANSITION ISSUES):

      [NUMERATOR:]

      The next questions are about preparing for his/her health care needs as he/she becomes an adult.

      Do any of his/her doctors or other health care providers treat only children?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      [If yes:]

      Have they talked with you about having his/her eventually see doctors or other health care providers who treat adults?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Have his/her doctors or other health care providers talked with you or him/her about his/her health care needs as he/she becomes an adult?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Eligibility for health insurance often changes as children reach adulthood. Has anyone discussed with you how to obtain or keep some type of health insurance coverage as he/she becomes an adult?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      How often do his/her doctors or other health care providers encourage him/her to take responsibility for his/her health care needs, such as (taking medication, understanding his/her health, or following medical advice)? Would you say?

      1. NEVER
      2. SOMETIMES
      3. USUALLY
      4. ALWAYS
      5. DON'T KNOW
      6. REFUSED

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Does your child currently need or use medicine prescribed by a doctor (other than vitamins)?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      [If yes:]

      Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Does your child need or use more medical care, metal health or educational services than is usual for most children of the same age?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      [If yes:]

      Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Is your child limited or prevented in any way in his or her ability to do things most children of the same age can do?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      [If yes:]

      Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Does your child need or get special therapy such as physical, occupational or speech therapy?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      [If yes:]

      Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      Does your child have any kind of emotional, developmental, or behavioral problem for which he or she gets treatment or counseling?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused

      [If yes:]

      Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know
      4. Refused
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
    Methodology Notes: 

      Youth with special health xare needs are considered to have health care providers who have discussed transition planning into adult health care if they or an adult proxy respond “yes, always, usually or sometimes”, to any of the Numerator questions after the first (screening) question.

      Youth with special health care needs are identified using the questions shown in the Numerator and Denominator section. Youth are considered to have special health care needs if if they or an adult proxy respond “yes” to all parts of at least one screener question and and its subparts.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs, whose health care provider has discussed transition planning into adult care

    Denominator: 

    Number of children aged 12 to 17 years with special health care needs

    Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

        From the 2005-06 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (Section 6B. TRANSITION ISSUES):

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next questions are about preparing for his/her health care needs as he/she becomes an adult.

        Do any of his/her doctors or other health care providers treat only children?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        [If yes:]

        Have they talked with you about having his/her eventually see doctors or other health care providers who treat adults?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Have his/her doctors or other health care providers talked with you or him/her about his/her health care needs as he/she becomes an adult?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Eligibility for health insurance often changes as children reach adulthood. Has anyone discussed with you how to obtain or keep some type of health insurance coverage as he/she becomes an adult?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        How often do his/her doctors or other health care providers encourage him/her to take responsibility for his/her health care needs, such as (taking medication, understanding his/her health, or following medical advice)? Would you say?

        1. NEVER
        2. SOMETIMES
        3. USUALLY
        4. ALWAYS
        5. DON'T KNOW
        6. REFUSED

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

        Does your child currently need or use medicine prescribed by a doctor (other than vitamins)?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        [If yes:]

        Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Does your child need or use more medical care, metal health or educational services than is usual for most children of the same age?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        [If yes:]

        Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Is your child limited or prevented in any way in his or her ability to do things most children of the same age can do?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        [If yes:]

        Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Does your child need or get special therapy such as physical, occupational or speech therapy?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        [If yes:]

        Is this because of ANY medical, behavioral or other health condition?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        Does your child have any kind of emotional, developmental, or behavioral problem for which he or she gets treatment or counseling?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused

        [If yes:]

        Is this a condition that has lasted or is expected to last for at least 12 months?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know
        4. Refused
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
    Methodology Notes: 

        Youth with special health xare needs are considered to have health care providers who have discussed transition planning into adult health care if they or an adult proxy respond “yes, always, usually or sometimes”, to any of the Numerator questions after the first (screening) question.

        Youth with special health care needs are identified using the questions shown in the Numerator and Denominator section. Youth are considered to have special health care needs if if they or an adult proxy respond “yes” to all parts of at least one screener question and and its subparts.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. National survey of children with special Health Care needs [Internet]. Portland (OR): Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI). c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
  • DH-6 Increase the proportion of people with epilepsy and uncontrolled seizures who receive appropriate medical care

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    57.7 (2010)
    Target: 
    63.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 years and over with epilepsy and uncontrolled seizures who report that they have visited a neurologist or epilepsy specialist in the past year

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 years and over with epilepsy and uncontrolled seizures

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2010 National Health Interview Survey:

      NUMERATOR:

      In the past year have you seen a neurologist or epilepsy specialist for your epilepsy or seizure disorder?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don’t know

      NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:

      Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have a seizure disorder or epilepsy?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don’t know

      Today is [fill: current date]. Think back to last year about the same time. About how many seizures of any type have you had in the past year? [*Read if necessary:] Some people may call it “convulsion,” “fit,” “falling out spell,”, “episode,”, “attack,”. “drop attack,” “staring spell,” or “out-of-touch.” [*If the respondent indicates that he/she has had nothing more than an aura and is unsure about counting the aura(s), do NOT count auras as seizures.]

      1. None
      2. One
      3. Two or three
      4. Between four and ten
      5. More than ten
      6. Refused
      7. Don’t know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Adults are considered to have epilepsy and uncontrolled seizures if they report having been told by a doctor that they have a seizure disorder or epilepsy and have had one or more seizures in the year prior to the survey. Adults with epilepsy and uncontrolled seizures are considered to have received appropriate medical care if they have seen a neurologist or epilepsy specialist for their seizure disorder within the past year.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    This objective moved from developmental to measurable in 2013.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system [Internet]. Atlanta (GA): National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    2. Current Population Survey (CPS), 2010 [Internet]. Washington (DC): Bureau of labor Statistics. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    3. Labor force statistics from the current population survey [Internet database]. Washington (DC): Bureau of Labor Statistics. c2010 – [cited 2010 Mar 11.].
  • DH-7 Reduce the proportion of older adults with disabilities who use inappropriate medications

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    18.0 (2009)
    Target: 
    10.8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Data from 2002-2009 were used to perform a trend analysis. We noted that exponential, polynomial and linear projections were valid with R-squared values approaching 1. Using the most conservative of the three projection methods, exponential projection, the target was set at 10.8 percent to be achieved by the end of the decade.
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over with basic activity limitations, complex activity limitations, or neither who received one or more of 33 potentially inappropriate medications during the calendar year as determined by the Beers criteria

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over with basic activity limitations, complex activity limitations, or neither

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2005 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      [Medical Provider Visits Section of MEPS]:

      During this {visit/telephone call}, were any medicines prescribed for (PERSON)? Please include only prescriptions which were filled.

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Please tell me the names of the prescriptions from these visits that were filled.

      _____________________

      [Prescribed Medicines Section of MEPS]:

      {Since (START DATE)/Between (START DATE) and (END DATE)}, (have/has) (PERSON) obtained any medicines [we have not yet talked about]? For example, (have/has) (PERSON) had any new prescriptions or a refill of a prescription? Please include any on-line prescriptions.

      1. Yes
      2. No

      What were the names of these medicines?

      _______________________

      {Since (START DATE)/Between (START DATE) and (END DATE)}, did (PERSON) get any free samples of prescribed medicines from a medical or dental provider that we have not yet talked about?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      What are the names of these medicines (PERSON) got as free samples?

      _____________________

      What is the name of the (next) pharmacy that filled the prescription(s) for (PERSON)?

      _____________________

      [Survey participants are then asked for permission to collect more detailed information from their pharmacies. At the pharmacies, data are collected on the type, dosage, and payment for each filled prescription. No information is collected for over-the-counter medications. No information is collected for prescription drugs obtained during hospital visits.]

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      {Basic activity limitations identifiers}

      Does anyone in the family have difficulties walking, climbing stairs, grasping objects, reaching overhead, lifting, bending or stooping, or standing for long periods of time?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Please look at this card and tell me how much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have lifting something as heavy as 10 pounds, such as a full bag of groceries? Would you say no difficulty, some difficulty, a lot of difficulty, or completely unable to do it?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      How much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have walking up 10 steps without resting?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      How much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have walking about 3 city blocks or about a quarter of a mile?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      How much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have walking a mile?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      How much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have standing for about 20 minutes?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      How much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have bending down or stooping from a standing position to pick up an object from the floor or tie a shoe?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      How much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have reaching overhead, for example to remove something from a shelf?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      How much difficulty (do/does) (PERSON) have using fingers to grasp or handle something such as picking up a glass from a table or using a pencil to write?

      1. No difficulty
      2. Some difficulty
      3. A lot of difficulty
      4. Completely unable to do it

      The next few questions are about difficulties people may have with everyday activities such as getting around, bathing, or taking medications. We are interested in difficulties due to impairment or a physical or mental health problem.

      Does anyone in the family receive help or supervision using the telephone, paying bills, taking medications, preparing light meals, doing laundry, or going shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does anyone in the family receive help or supervision with personal care such as bathing, dressing, or getting around the house? Who is that?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Person: ___________

      Does anyone in the family wear eyeglasses or contact lenses? Who is that?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Person: ___________

      Does anyone in the family have any difficulty seeing {with glasses or contacts, if they use them}? Who is that?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Person: ___________

      [For persons identified as having difficulty seeing]: Can (PERSON) not see anything at all, that is, (are/is) (PERSON) blind?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does anyone in the family have a hearing aid? Who is that?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Person: ___________

      Does anyone in the family have any difficulty hearing {with a hearing aid if they use one}? Who is that?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Person: ___________

      [For persons identified as having difficulty hearing {with a hearing aid, if they use one}]:

      Can (PERSON) not hear any speech at all, that is, (are/is) (PERSON) deaf?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      {Complex activity limitations identifiers}

      Is anyone in the family limited in any way in the ability to work at a job, do housework, or go to school, because of impairment or a physical or mental health problem? Who is that? For which activities is the person limited in doing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Person: ___________
      4. Activity: ___________

      Besides the limitations we just talked about, is anyone in the family limited in participating in social, recreational or family activities because of impairment or a physical or mental health problem?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    Methodology Notes: 

      The Beers criteria provide a list of medications that are generally considered inappropriate when given to elderly people because these medications may pose more risk than benefit. For a wide variety of individual reasons, the medications listed tend to cause side effects in the elderly due to the physiologic changes of aging. The criteria were created through consensus of a panel of experts and were most recently updated in 2003.

      According to the established Beers criteria, drugs that should always be avoided for adults over age 65 include barbiturates, flurazepam, meprobamate, chlorpropamide, meperidine, pentazocine, trimethobenzamide, belladonna alkaloids, dicyclomine, hyoscyamine, and propantheline. Drugs that should often be avoided for adults over age 65 include carisoprodol, chlorzoxazone, cyclobenzaprine, metaxalone, methocarbamol, amitriptyline, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, doxepin, indomethacin, dipyridamole, ticlopidine, methyldopa, reserpine, disopyramide, oxybutynin, chlorpheniramine, cyproheptadine, diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, promethazine, and propoxyphene.

      Individuals are considered to receive inappropriate medications if they indicate that they purchased any of the medications on the BEERS list as listed in the numerator section.

      Individuals are considered to be adults, aged 65 and over, with activity limitations if they answered “yes” to questions in the denominator section.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    This objective moved from developmental to measurable in 2014.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2007 National Healthcare Disparities Report. Rockville (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; February 2008. AHRQ publication No. 08-0041.
    2. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey [Internet]. Washington (DC): Agency for Health Care Quality Research (AHRQ).
    3. Zhan C, Sangl J, Bierman AS, et al. Potentially inappropriate medication use in the community-dwelling elderly. Findings from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. JAMA. 2001;286(22):2823-29.
  • DH-8 Reduce the proportion of adults with disabilities aged 18 and older who experience physical or program barriers that limit or prevent them from using available local health and wellness programs

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    76.8 (2011)
    Target: 
    69.1
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 years and over with disabilities who experience barriers to accessing local health, wellness, or fitness programs that meet their needs

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 18 years and over with disabilities.

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2010 National Health Interview Survey Supplement:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Do you NOW have ACCESS to a health club, wellness program or fitness facility that meets your needs, if you wanted to use one?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Do any of these things on the list limit or prevent your access to a health club, wellness program, or fitness facility that meets your needs?

      1. None
      2. Cost is too high for your budget
      3. Lack of transportation
      4. Access into/within the building
      5. Lack of exercise equipment that meets your needs
      6. Lack of an instructor to show you how to use the equipment
      7. Other
      8. Refused
      9. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR (DISABILITY IDENTIFIERS):]

      1 year old or older:

      Is this person deaf or do they have serious difficulty hearing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Is this person blind or do they have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      5 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      15 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Methodology Notes: 

      People are considered to encounter barriers to participation at local health and wellness facilities if they respond “No” to access AND if they identify at least one barrier in the second question listed in the numerator section above. People with disabilities are identified if they or a proxy adult respondent indicates “yes” to any of the questions listed above in the denominator section.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    The HP2010 objective with the same definition was 06-10 <a href="https://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010/" class="pub_med_link" target="_blank">https://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010/</a>.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2015, DH-8 was moved from developmental to measurable (a baseline and target were established) and was reworded. The objective statement is: Reduce the proportion of adults with disabilities aged 18 years and older who experience physical or program barriers that limit or prevent them from using available local health and wellness programs. The baseline is 76.8 percent in 2011. The target of 69.1 percent was set using the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Klein RJ, Schoenborn CA. Age adjustment using the 2000 projected U.S. population. Statistical Notes No. 20. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2001.
    2. NHIS Data Questionnaires and Related Documentation. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.
  • DH-9 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of people with disabilities who encounter barriers to participating in home, school, work, or community activities

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of individuals with disabilities who experience delays in receiving needed primary and periodic preventive care due to barriers

    Denominator: 

    Number of individuals with disabilities

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.
  • DH-10 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of people with disabilities who report barriers to obtaining the assistive devices, service animals, technology services, and accessible technologies that they need

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons with disabilities who experience barriers to obtaining the devices, technologies or services that they need

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons with disabilities

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Methodology Notes: 

      People with disabilities are identified as having unmet need if the respondent indicates “no” to the first question and “yes” the second question listed in the numerator section. People with disabilities are identified if they or a proxy adult respondent indicate “yes” to any of the questions listed above in the denominator section.

      People with disabilities are identified as having unmet need if the respondent indicates “no” to the first question and “yes” the second question listed in the numerator section. People with disabilities are identified if they or a proxy adult respondent indicate “yes” to any of the questions listed above in the denominator section.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. 2002 NHIS basic module adult core revised: October 23, 2003 Pages 88-94 [Internet]. Rockville (MD): National Center on Health Statistics. c2010- [cited March10.].
    2. Klein RJ, Schoenborn CA. Age adjustment using the 2000 projected U.S. population. Statistical Notes No. 20. Hyattsville (MD): National Center for Health Statistics. 2001.
  • DH-11 Increase the proportion of all occupied homes and residential buildings that have visitable features

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    American Housing Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    42.1 (2007)
    Target: 
    46.3
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of occupied homes and residential buildings that have visitable features; namely a no step entrance

    Denominator: 

    Number of occupied homes and residential buildings

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2007 American Housing Survey, 2007:

      NOSTEP entrance accessible without steps or stairs

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't Know
      4. Refused
      5. Blank; Not reported
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      In cooperation with the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Census Bureau conducts the American Housing Survey (AHS), a biennial survey of the nation's housing market. The AHS is conducted by the Census Bureau’s 12 regional offices using telephone and personal visit interviews. The Bureau staff make personal visits if the housing unit is new to the AHS sample; if the household living in the sampled unit has changed since the previous interview; or if the period between the interviews exceeds several years, which is the case for the metropolitan areas.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. American Housing Survey (AHS), 2007 [Internet]. Washington (DC): Department of Housing and Urban Developmental. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    2. Office of Policy Development and Research (PD&R) and HUD user [Internet]. Washington (DC): Department of Housing and Urban Developmental. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
  • DH-12 Reduce the number of people with disabilities living in congregate care residences.

    • DH-12.1 Reduce the number of adults with disabilities aged 22 years and older living in congregate care residences that serve 16 or more persons

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Survey of State Developmental Disabilities Directors
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      number
      Baseline (Year): 
      57,462 (2008)
      Target: 
      31,604
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Projection/trend analysis
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Trend data from the Survey of State Developmental Disabilities Directors were used to perform a linear regression for data between 2000 and 2008.The proposed target is based on the assumption that the same rate of improvement continues from one decade to the next.
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons aged 22 years and over with disability who live in large non-nursing, congregate care residences that serve 16 or more people

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 Survey of State Developmental Disabilities Directors:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Please indicate the number of individuals aged 22 and older who live in each of the following categories of non-nursing, congregate care settings that serve individuals with developmental and other disabilities.

        1. 1-3 residents
        2. 4-6 residents
        3. 1-6 residents
        4. 7-15 residents
        5. 16+ residents
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        State Developmental Disability Directors are asked to complete a form indicating how many individuals with developmental and other disabilities live in non-nursing congregate care facilities that serve persons with developmental and other disabilities. The information is abstracted and analyzed by investigators at the University of Minnesota and reported in Residential Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities: Status and Trends.

        Adults living in facilities with 16 or more residents are considered to live in large non nursing, congregate settings for people with developmental and other disabilities.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Lakin KC, Larson S, Salmi P, Scott N., eds. Residential services for persons with developmental disabilities: status and trends through 2008. Minneapolis (MN): University of Minnesota, Research and Training Center on Community Living, Institute on Community Integration, 2009.
    • DH-12.2 Reduce the number of children and youth with disabilities aged 21 years and under living in congregate care residences

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Survey of State Developmental Disabilities Directors
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      number
      Baseline (Year): 
      20,762 (2009)
      Target: 
      18,686
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons aged 21 years and under with disability who live in a large non-nursing, congregate care residences that serve 16 or more people

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2009 Survey of State Developmental Disabilities Directors:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Please indicate the number of individuals aged 21 and younger who live in each of the following categories of non-nursing, congregate care settings that serve individuals with developmental and other disabilities.

        1. 1-3 residents
        2. 4-6 residents
        3. 1-6 residents
        4. 7-15 residents
        5. 16+ residents.
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        State Developmental Disability Directors are asked to complete a form indicating how many individuals with developmental and other disabilities live in non-nursing congregate care facilities that serve persons with developmental and other disabilities. The information is abstracted and analyzed by investigators at the University of Minnesota and reported in Residential Services for Persons with Developmental Disabilities: Status and Trends.

        Children and youth living in facilities with 16 or more residents are considered to live in large non nursing, congregate settings for people with developmental and other disabilities.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      The original baseline was revised from 28,890 (2009) to 20,762 (2009) to correct a coding error. In keeping with the original target setting method (10 percent improvement), the target was revised from 26,001 to 18,686

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Lakin KC, Larson S, Salmi P, Scott N., eds. Residential services for persons with developmental disabilities: status and trends through 2008. Minneapolis (MN): University of Minnesota, Research and Training Center on Community Living, Institute on Community Integration, 2009.
  • DH-13 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of adults with disabilities aged 18 years and older who participate in leisure, social, religious or community activities

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Numerator: 

    Number of people with disabilities aged 18 and over who participate in leisure, social, religious or community activities

    Denominator: 

    Number of people with disabilities aged 18 and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2010 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      For each of the following activities, Please tell me if you,

      • Participate in leisure or social activities?
      • Get out with friends or family?
      • Participate in religious activities?
      • Participate in community gatherings?

      (Response Categories for the above questions:)

      1. Do the activity
      2. Don't do the activity
      3. Unable to do the activity
      4. Refused
      5. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR (DISABILITY IDENTIFIERS):]

      1 year old or older:

      Is this person deaf or do they have serious difficulty hearing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Is this person blind or do they have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      5 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      15 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      People with disabilities are considered to participate in social activities if they or an adult proxy respond “yes” to the question listed in the numerator section. People with disabilities are identified if they or a proxy adult respondent respond “yes” to any of the questions listed in the denominator section.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    Healthy People 2020 DH-13 has a subject relationship with HP2010 DSC 06-04 <a href="https://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010/" class="pub_med_link" target="_blank">https://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010/</a>. The survey questions for the objective were modified in Healthy People 2020.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2017, DH-13 was moved from measurable to developmental due to a technical error. In 2015, DH-13 was moved from developmental to measurable (a baseline and target were established) and was reworded. The objective statement is: Increase the proportion of adults with activity limitations aged 18 years and older who participate in leisure, social, religious or community activities. The baseline is 66.5 percent in 2010. The target of 73.1 percent was set using the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Klein RJ, Schoenborn CA. Age adjustment using the 2000 projected U.S. population. Statistical Notes No. 20. Hyattsville (MD): National Center for Health Statistics. 2001.
    2. World Health Organization. International classification of functioning, disability and health. Geneva: World Health Organization. 2001.
  • DH-14 Increase the proportion of children and youth with disabilities who spend at least 80 percent of their time in regular education programs

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act data
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    56.8 (2007–08)
    Target: 
    73.8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Trend data from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act database were used to perform a linear regression for data between 2000 and 2008. The proposed target is based on the assumption that the same rate of improvement continues from one decade to the next.
    Numerator: 

    Number of students aged 6 to 21 years with disabilities who are in regular classrooms at least 80 percent of the day

    Denominator: 

    Number of students aged 6 to 21 years with disabilities in all classroom settings

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Data come from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Data System, administered by the Department of Education, Office of Special Education. Data are based on counts of the number of students with disabilities as specified in the numerator and denominator definitions. Data are aggregated by states and territories for a total of 57 entries (50 states plus DC, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, Virgin Islands, Northern Mariana Islands, Bureau of Indian Affairs). Thus specific population or demographic data are unavailable (i.e. data by gender, race-ethnicity).

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. OSEP's Annual Reports to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) [Internet]. Washington (DC): U.S. Department of Education. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
  • DH-15 Reduce unemployment among people with disabilities

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Current Population Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    15.6 (2009)
    Target: 
    14.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities who want a job, are available to work, and are actively looking for work

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities who are in the U.S. labor force

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2009 Current Population Survey:

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Is anyone in the household deaf or do they have serious difficulty hearing?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Is this person blind or do they have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Are you a citizen of the United States?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Last week, did you do any work for either pay or profit?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Did you have more than one job, including part time evening or weekend?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does anyone in this household have a business or farm?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Last week, did you do any unpaid work in the family business or farm?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Did you receive any payments or profits from the business?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Last week (in addition to the business) did you have a job, either full time or part time? Include any job from which you were temporarily absent.

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Are you being paid by employer for any of the time off?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Last week, were you on layoff from a job?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Has your employer given you a date to return to work?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Have you been given any indication that you will be recalled to work within the next six months?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Do you currently want a job, either full time or part time

      1. Yes or maybe, it depends
      2. No
      3. Has a job

      Have you been doing anything to find work during the last four weeks?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      What are all of the things you have done to find work during the last four weeks?

      [Please list]______________________

      Last week, could you have started a job if one had been offered?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      [If No:] Why is that? [If reason other than temporary illness, the person is NOT in the labor force.]

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      The Unemployment Rate is equal to the number of U.S. civilian citizens aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities who are unemployed divided by the number of U.S. civilian citizens aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities who are in the labor force.

      A person is identified with a disability if he/she responded “yes” to any of the first six questions. A person is considered unemployed if he/she responded “yes” to being laid off from a job or wanting a job and doing anything to find a job. A person is considered to be in the labor force if he/she responded “yes” to being a U.S. citizen and “yes” to any of the following questions: being laid off from a job, wanting and job and doing anything to find a job, being able to start a job, doing any work for pay, having more than one job, having a business or farm, doing unpaid work in a family business, receiving payments or profits, having a job or temporarily absent, or being paid for time off.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    The original baseline was revised from 14.5% (2009) to 15.6% (2009) to correct a programming error. The original estimate measured unemployment among persons aged 16 years and over; it was corrected to measure unemployment among persons aged 16 to 64 years. The target was adjusted from 13.1 to 14.0 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Current Population Survey (CPS), 2010 [Internet]. Washington (DC): Bureau of labor Statistics. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    2. Labor force statistics from the current population survey [Internet database]. Washington (DC): Bureau of Labor Statistics. c2010 – [cited 2010 Mar 11.].
  • DH-16 Increase employment among people with disabilities

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Current Population Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    29.7 (2009)
    Target: 
    32.7
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities who are employed

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities in the U.S. who are in the labor force

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2009 Current Population Survey:

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      Is anyone in the household deaf or do they have serious difficulty hearing?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Is this person blind or do they have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Are you a citizen of the United States?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Last week, did you do any work for either pay or profit?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Did you have more than one job, including part time evening or weekend?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Does anyone in this household have a business or farm?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Last week, did you do any unpaid work in the family business or farm?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Did you receive any payments or profits from the business?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Last week (in addition to the business) did you have a job, either full time or part time? Include any job from which you were temporarily absent.

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Are you being paid by employer for any of the time off?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      The Employment Rate (also called the Employment-Population Ratio) is equal to the number of U.S. civilian citizens aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities who are employed divided by the number of U.S. civilian citizens aged 16 to 64 years with disabilities who are in the labor force (ready and able to work).

      A person is identified with a disability if he/she responded “yes” to any of the first six questions. A person is considered employed if he/she responded “yes” to any of the following questions: doing any work for pay, having more than one job, doing unpaid work in a family business, receiving payments or profits, having a job, being temporarily absent from their job, or being paid for time off. A person is considered to be in the labor force if he/she responded “yes” to being a U.S. citizen and “yes” to any of the following questions: being laid off from a job, wanting and job and doing anything to find a job, being able to start a job, doing any work for pay, having more than one job, having a business or farm, doing unpaid work in a family business, receiving payments or profits, having a job or temporarily absent, or being paid for time off.

    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 06-08 in that the data source for the Healthy People 2010 objective was the National Health Interview Survey and the age range monitored was 18 to 64 years. The data source for Healthy People 2020 was changed to the Current Population Survey, which enabled monitoring a broader age range (16 to 64 years).

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    The original baseline was revised from 19.2% (2009) to 29.7% (2009) to correct a programming error. The original estimate measured employment among persons aged 16 years and over; it was corrected to measure employment among persons aged 16 to 64 years. The target was adjusted from 21.1 to 32.7 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Current Population Survey (CPS), 2010 [Internet]. Washington (DC): Bureau of labor Statistics. c2010 – [cited 2010, Mar 10.].
    2. Labor force statistics from the current population survey [Internet database]. Washington (DC): Bureau of Labor Statistics. c2010 – [cited 2010 Mar 11.].
  • DH-17 Increase the proportion of adults with disabilities who report sufficient social and emotional support

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    69.5 (2008)
    Target: 
    76.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with disabilities who report that they have sufficient social and emotional support

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with disabilities

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      How often do you get the social and emotional support you need?

      1. Always
      2. Usually
      3. Sometimes
      4. Rarely
      5. Never
      6. Refused/Not ascertained/Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR (Disability Identifiers):]

      Are you limited in any way in any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Do you now have any health problem that requires you to use special equipment, such as a cane, a wheelchair, a special bed, or a special telephone?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Don't know/Not sure
      4. Refused
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Since 2005, the numerator question has resided in the core of the BRFSS representing all 50 states, DC, and some territories. Adults with disabilities are considered to have sufficient social and emotional support if they respond “always” or “usually” to the question listed in the numerator section.

      Since 2003, the questions identifying persons with disabilities have resided in the core of the BRFSS representing all 50 states, DC, and some territories. Adults with disabilities are identified in this objective if they responded “yes” to questions listed in the denominator section.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Household Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Obesity Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    Caveats and Limitations: 
    The BRFSS is conducted independently by each state and therefore methodologies may vary. Pooled national estimates may not take into account these differences and so may differ from estimates obtained using data sources that use methodologies designed to produce national estimates.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Numerator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with disabilities who report that they have sufficient social and emotional support

    Denominator: 

    Number of adults aged 18 years and over with disabilities

    Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

        From the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        How often do you get the social and emotional support you need?

        1. Always
        2. Usually
        3. Sometimes
        4. Rarely
        5. Never
        6. Refused/Not ascertained/Don't know

        [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR (Disability Identifiers):]

        Are you limited in any way in any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems?

        1. Yes
        2. No

        Do you now have any health problem that requires you to use special equipment, such as a cane, a wheelchair, a special bed, or a special telephone?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don't know/Not sure
        4. Refused
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        Since 2005, the numerator question has resided in the core of the BRFSS representing all 50 states, DC, and some territories. Adults with disabilities are considered to have sufficient social and emotional support if they respond “always” or “usually” to the question listed in the numerator section.

        Since 2003, the questions identifying persons with disabilities have resided in the core of the BRFSS representing all 50 states, DC, and some territories. Adults with disabilities are identified in this objective if they responded “yes” to questions listed in the denominator section.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Household Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Obesity Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    Caveats and Limitations: 
    The BRFSS is conducted independently by each state and therefore methodologies may vary. Pooled national estimates may not take into account these differences and so may differ from estimates obtained using data sources that use methodologies designed to produce national estimates.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
    2. Klein RJ, Schoenborn CA. Age adjustment using the 2000 projected U.S. population. Statistical Notes No. 20. Hyattsville (MD): National Center for Health Statistics. 2001.
  • DH-18 Reduce the proportion of adults with disabilities aged 18 and older who experience serious psychological distress

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    14.4 (2010)
    Target: 
    13.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of people with disabilities aged 18 and over who experienced serious psychological distress

    Denominator: 

    Number of people with disabilities aged 18 and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2010 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      During the PAST 30 DAYS, how often did you feel:

      • So sad that nothing could cheer you up?
      • Nervous?
      • Restless or fidgety?
      • Hopeless?
      • That everything was an effort?
      • Worthless?

      (Response categories for the above questions:)

      1. ALL of the time
      2. MOST of the time
      3. SOME of the time
      4. A LITTLE of the time
      5. NONE of the time
      6. Refused/Not ascertained/Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR (DISABILITY IDENTIFIERS):]

      1 year old or older:

      Is this person deaf or do they have serious difficulty hearing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Is this person blind or do they have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      5 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      15 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know
    Methodology Notes: 

      An adult is considered to have symptoms of psychological distress if they or an adult proxy responds “yes” to ALL of the time or MOST of the time to any of the numerator questions for adults. The six adult questions reflect the Kessler 6 scale which is used internationally to assess feelings of sadness, restlessness, hopelessness, nervousness, worthlessness, and the sense that everything is an effort. Positive responses increase the score. This scale has the sensitivity and specificity to effectively discriminate between cases and non-cases of DSM-IV mood disorders, but it cannot define which specific disorder (such as clinical depression, generalized anxiety disorder) that any given respondent to the survey may have.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    The Healthy People 2010 objective with the same operational definition was DSC 06-03 <a href="https://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010/" class="pub_med_link" target="_blank">https://wonder.cdc.gov/data2010/</a>.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2015, DH-18 was moved from developmental to measurable (a baseline and target were established) and was reworded. The objective statement is Reduce the proportion of adults with disabilities aged 18 and older who experience serious psychological distress. The baseline is 13.4 percent in 2010. The target of 12.1 percent was set using the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Atlanta (GA): National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
    2. Kessler RC, Andrews G, Colpe LJ, Hiripi E, Mroczek DK, Normand S-LT, Walters EE, Zaslavsky AM. Short screening scales to monitor population prevalences and trends in nonspecific psychological distress. PsycholMed 2002;32:959 – 976.
    3. Klein RJ, Schoenborn CA. Age adjustment using the 2000 projected U.S. population. Statistical Notes No. 20. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2001.
  • DH-19 Reduce the proportion of persons with disabilities aged five and older who in the previous three months experience nonfatal injuries that require medical care

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    5.7 (2010)
    Target: 
    5.1
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons with disabilities aged 5 and over who experience nonfatal injuries in the previous three months that required medical care

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons with disabilities aged 5 and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the National Health Interview Survey, Family Core, 2010 (Injuries & Poisoning section):

      [NUMERATOR:]

      During the past three months, did you or anyone in your family have an injury where any part of the body was hurt, [random example provided e.g., cut or wound, broken bone, sprain or burn]?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR (DISABILITY IDENTIFIERS):]

      1 year old or older:

      Is this person deaf or do they have serious difficulty hearing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Is this person blind or do they have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      5 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      15 years old or older:

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      Did he/she talk to or see a medical professional about this/these injuries?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Don't know

      How many of those times was the injury serious enough that a medical professional was consulted?

      1. 1-91 times
      2. Refused
      3. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      A person is considered to experience a nonfatal medically treated unintentional injury if they or a proxy adult responded "yes" to the questions listed in the numerator section. A person may indicate up to a total of ten injury and/or poisoning episodes in the time frame and will be represented in the Injury/Poisoning Episode file as many times as he/she had unique injury and/or poisoning episodes. A binary variable (yes=injured, no=not injured in past 3 months) was used.

      People with disabilities are identified if they or a proxy adult respondent indicates "yes" to any of the questions listed above in the denominator section.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Sex: 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Family Type: 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Country of Birth: 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Disability Status: 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Geographic Location: 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
      • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
      • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2015, DH-19 was moved from developmental to measurable (a baseline and target were established) and was reworded. The objective statement is: Reduce the proportion of persons with disabilities aged five and older who in the previous three months experience nonfatal injuries that require medical care. The baseline is 5.7 percent in 2010. The target of 5.1 percent was set using the 10 percent improvement target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Behavioral risk factor surveillance system. Atlanta. GA: National Center on Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
    2. Klein RJ, Schoenborn CA. Age adjustment using the 2000 projected U.S. population. Statistical Notes No. 20. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2001.
    3. NHIS Data Questionnaires and Related Documentation. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.
  • DH-20 Increase the proportion of children with disabilities, birth through age 2 years, who receive early intervention services in home or community-based settings

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act data
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    91.0 (2007)
    Target: 
    95.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Trend data from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act database were used to perform a linear regression for data between 1997 and 2010. The proposed target is based on the assumption that the same rate of improvement continues from one decade to the next.
    Numerator: 

    Number of children aged 0 (birth) to 2 years with disabilities who receive early intervention services through Part C of IDEA in home or community-based settings

    Denominator: 

    Number of children aged 0 (birth) to 2 years with disabilities who need early intervention services through Part C of IDEA in all settings

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Data are derived from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) database, Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. As required under Section 618 of IDEA, states and territories report the setting where Part C services are delivered (home, community-based, or other).

      Data are based on child counts as defined in the numerator and denominator sections. Data are aggregated by states and territories so that there are a total of 57 entries (50 states plus DC, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, Virgin Islands, Northern Mariana Islands, Bureau of Indian Affairs). Specific population template data are unavailable (e.g., data by gender, race-ethnicity).

    References

    Additional resources about the objective