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Injury and Violence Prevention Data Details

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  • IVP-1 Reduce fatal and nonfatal injuries

    • IVP-1.1 Reduce fatal injuries
      LHI

      Leading Health Indicators are a subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives selected to communicate high-priority health issues.

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      59.7 (2007)
      Target: 
      53.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of deaths with an underlying cause of injury (ICD-10 codes *U01-*U03, V01-Y36, Y85-Y87, Y89)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Leading Health Indicator:
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of deaths with an underlying cause of injury (ICD-10 codes *U01-*U03, V01-Y36, Y85-Y87, Y89)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

          FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 59.2 to 59.7. The target was adjusted from 53.3 to 53.7 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Fingerhut LA and Warner M. The ICD–10 injury mortality diagnosis matrix. Injury Prevention 2006;12:24-9.
    • IVP-1.2 Reduce hospitalizations for nonfatal injuries

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Discharge Survey
      Population Estimates
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      617.6 (2007)
      Target: 
      555.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of hospitalizations for nonfatal injuries (first listed ICD-9-CM codes 800–908, 909.0–909.2, 909.4, 909.9, 910–994, 995.50–995.59, 995.80–995.85)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Those who died in the hospital were excluded.

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Hospital discharge Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population for rates of data year 2007, the 2007 estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Region: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64
        • Marital Status: 15-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Barrell, V., Aharonson-Daniel, L, Fingerhut, L.A., et al. An introduction to the Barell body region by nature of injury diagnosis matrix. Injury Prevention 8:91-96, 2002. Also see updated (November 2005) diagnosis matrix.
    • IVP-1.3 Reduce emergency department (ED) visits for nonfatal injuries

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
      Population Estimates
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      8,370.4 (2007)
      Target: 
      7,533.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of initial emergency department visits for nonfatal injury or poisoning (first listed  ICD-9-CM codes 800-909.2, 909.4, 909.9-994.9, 995.50-995.59, 995.80-995.85, E800-E869, E880-E929, E950-E999) that were not admitted to the hospital or transferred to another facility.

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

        Rates by geographic location and health insurance status are for the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64
      Trend Issues: 
      Due to the change from the International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9-CM to ICD-10-CM this objective has a final tracking data year of 2015.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-12 in that the estimates now exclude emergency department visits that are admitted to the hospital or transferred to another facility to avoid double counting of the more severe injuries that will be tracked by the new objectives for nonfatal injury hospitalizations (IVP-1.2) and injury deaths (IVP-1.1).

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2017 the target was changed from 7,453.4 per 100,000 population to 7,533.4 per 100,000 population to reflect the target setting method of a 10 percent improvement over the baseline.
  • IVP-2 Reduce fatal and nonfatal traumatic brain injuries

    • IVP-2.1 Reduce fatal traumatic brain injuries

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      17.4 (2007)
      Target: 
      15.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of deaths caused by traumatic brain injury (ICD-10 codes S01.0-S01.9, S02.0, S02.1, S02.3, S02.7-S02.9, S04.0, S06.0-S06.9, S07.0, S07.1, S07.8, S07.9, S09.7-S09.9, T90.1, T90.2, T90.4, T90.5, T90.8, T90.9 in any field of the multiple cause of death file) among deaths with an underlying external cause-of-injury (ICD-10 codes ICD-10 codes *U01-*U03, V01-Y36, Y85-Y87, Y89)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) definition is consistent with that used in the State Injury Indicators Report. These reports compile injury data voluntarily collected by state health departments. They consolidate data from hospital records, death certificates, and several national surveillance systems and provide the rates of various injuries and related factors.

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of deaths caused by traumatic brain injury (ICD-10 codes S01.0-S01.9, S02.0, S02.1, S02.3, S02.7-S02.9, S04.0, S06.0-S06.9, S07.0, S07.1, S07.8, S07.9, S09.7-S09.9, T90.1, T90.2, T90.4, T90.5, T90.8, T90.9 in any field of the multiple cause of death file) among deaths with an underlying external cause-of-injury (ICD-10 codes ICD-10 codes *U01-*U03, V01-Y36, Y85-Y87, Y89)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) definition is consistent with that used in the State Injury Indicators Report. These reports compile injury data voluntarily collected by state health departments. They consolidate data from hospital records, death certificates, and several national surveillance systems and provide the rates of various injuries and related factors.

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 17.3 to 17.4. The target was adjusted from 15.6 to 15.7 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Fingerhut LA and Warner M. The ICD–10 injury mortality diagnosis matrix. Injury Prevention 2006;12:24-9.
      2. Traumatic Brain Injury

    • IVP-2.2 Reduce hospitalizations for nonfatal traumatic brain injuries

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Discharge Survey
      Population Estimates
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      85.6 (2007)
      Target: 
      77.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of hospitalizations for nonfatal traumatic brain injuries (ICD-9-CM codes 800.0-801.9, 803.0-804.9, 850.0-854.1, 950.1-950.3, 995.55, 959.01 in any of the seven diagnostic fields) among the injury hospital discharge subset (first listed diagnosis of ICD-9-CM 800-909.2, 909.4, 909.9-994.9, 995.50-995.59, 995.80-995.85).

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) definition is based on the Barell Matrix. TBI types 1, 2, and 3 are included. The increased use of 959.01 was accompanied by a corresponding drop in the use of 854. Thus, to avoid underestimating TBI’s, cases coded as 959.01 were also included. Those who died in the hospital were excluded.

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Hospital discharge Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population for rates of data year 2007, the 2007 estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Region: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64
        • Marital Status: 15-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Barrell, V., Aharonson-Daniel, L, Fingerhut, L.A., et al. An introduction to the Barell body region by nature of injury diagnosis matrix. Injury Prevention 8:91-96, 2002. Also see updated (November 2005) diagnosis matrix.
      2. Faul M, Cu L, Wald MM, Coronado VG. Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States. Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations and Deaths 2002-2006. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2010. www.cdc.gov/TraumaticBrainInjury
      3. Traumatic Brain Injury

    • IVP-2.3 Reduce emergency department (ED) visits for nonfatal traumatic brain injuries

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
      Population Estimates
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      407.2 (2007)
      Target: 
      366.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of initial emergency department visits for nonfatal traumatic brain injuries (ICD-9-CM codes 800.0-801.9, 803.0-804.9, 850.0-854.1, 950.1-950.3, 995.55, 959.01 in any of the three diagnostic fields) among the injury ED subset (first listed ICD-9-CM 800-909.2, 909.4, 909.9-994.9, 995.50-995.59, 995.80-995.85, E800-E869, E880-E929, E950-E999) that were not admitted to the hospital or transferred to another facility.

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) definition is based on the Barell Matrix. TBI types 1, 2, and 3 are included. The increased use of 959.01 was accompanied by a corresponding drop in the use of 854. Thus, to avoid underestimating TBIs, cases coded as 959.01 were also included.

        Those who died, were admitted to the same or transferred to another hospital, or who have an unknown disposition were excluded.

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

        Rates by geographic location and health insurance status are for the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64
      Trend Issues: 
      Due to the change from the International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9-CM to ICD-10-CM this objective has a final tracking data year of 2015.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2017 the target was changed from 365.3 per 100,000 population to 366.5 per 100,000 population to reflect the target setting method of a 10 percent improvement over the baseline.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Barrell, V., Aharonson-Daniel, L, Fingerhut, L.A., et al. An introduction to the Barell body region by nature of injury diagnosis matrix. Injury Prevention 8:91-96, 2002. Also see updated (November 2005) diagnosis matrix.
      2. Faul M, Cu L, Wald MM, Coronado VG. Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States. Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations and Deaths 2002-2006. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2010. www.cdc.gov/TraumaticBrainInjury
      3. Traumatic Brain Injury

  • IVP-3 Reduce fatal and nonfatal spinal cord injuries

    • IVP-3.1 Reduce fatal spinal cord injuries

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      0.53 (2007)
      Target: 
      0.48
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of deaths caused by traumatic spinal cord injury (ICD-10 codes S14.0-.1, S24.0-.1, S34.0-.1, S34.3, T09.3, T91.3 in any field of the multiple cause of death file) among deaths with an underlying external cause-of-injury (ICD-10 codes ICD-10 codes *U01-*U03, V01-Y36, Y85-Y87, Y89).

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of deaths caused by traumatic spinal cord injury (ICD-10 codes S14.0-.1, S24.0-.1, S34.0-.1, S34.3, T09.3, T91.3 in any field of the multiple cause of death file) among deaths with an underlying external cause-of-injury (ICD-10 codes ICD-10 codes *U01-*U03, V01-Y36, Y85-Y87, Y89).

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Fingerhut LA and Warner M. The ICD–10 injury mortality diagnosis matrix. Injury Prevention 2006;12:24-9.
      2. Spinal Cord Injury Fact Sheet

    • IVP-3.2 Reduce hospitalizations for nonfatal traumatic spinal cord injuries

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Discharge Survey
      Population Estimates
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      3.6 (2007)
      Target: 
      3.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of hospitalizations for nonfatal traumatic spinal cord injuries (ICD-9-CM codes 806, 952 in any of the seven diagnostic fields) among the injury hospital discharge subset (first listed diagnosis of ICD-9-CM 800–909.2, 909.4, 909.9–994.9, 995.50–995.59, 995.80–995.85).

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Those who died in the hospital were excluded.

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Hospital discharge Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population for rates of data year 2007, the 2007 estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Sex: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Region: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Health Insurance Status: 0-17, 18-44, 45-64
        • Marital Status: 15-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

  • IVP-4 (Developmental) Increase the number of States and the District of Columbia where 90 percent of deaths among children aged 17 years and under that are due to external causes are reviewed by a child fatality review team

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    National Center for Child Death Review
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    number
    Numerator: 

    Number of states and the District of Columbia where 90 percent of deaths to children aged 17 years and under that are due to external causes are reviewed by a child fatality team

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-6 in that the threshold for the state-level child fatality review for deaths due to external was decreased from 100% to 90% of such deaths.
  • IVP-5 (Developmental) Increase the number of States and the District of Columbia where 90 percent of sudden and unexpected deaths to infants are reviewed by a child fatality review team

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    National Center for Child Death Review
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    number
    Numerator: 

    Number of states and the District of Columbia where 90 percent of sudden and unexpected deaths to infants are reviewed by a child fatality review team

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
  • IVP-6 Increase the proportion of States and the District of Columbia with statewide emergency department data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes for 90 percent or more of injury-related visits

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Emergency Department Databases
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    67.9 (2008)
    Target: 
    85.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Current data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Emergency Department Databases (HCUP SEDDs) suggest that in their data sets, several States have external-cause-of-injury coding of 80 to 89 percent of injury-related emergency department records. During the next decade, AHRQ HCUP likely will add data from more States in which case the proportion may change.
    Numerator: 

    Number of states with statewide emergency department data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes (ICD-9-CM E codes E800-E848, E850-E999) on 90% or more of injury-related ED records; i.e., records where the principal diagnosis was an injury (ICD-9-CM codes 800-909.2, 909.4, 909.9, 910-994.9, 995.5-995.59, 995.80-995.85)

    Denominator: 

    Number of states with statewide emergency department data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes on injury-related ED records; i.e., records where the principal diagnosis was an injury

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Emergency Department Databases (SEDDs) provide the best available centralized data sources for estimating the percentage of external-cause-of-injury coded ED records from state-based ED data systems. Twenty-seven states now participate in the HCUP SEDDs.

    Trend Issues: 
    The number of states with statewide hospital discharge data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes on injury-related hospital discharge records varies from year to year. 2008: 42 states excluding AL, AK, DE, DC, ID, MS, MT, ND, and NM, 2009: 44 states excluding AL, AK, DE, DC, ID, MS, and ND, 2010: 45 states excluding AL, DE, DC, ID, ND, and NH, and 2011: 46 states excluding AL, DE, DC, ID, and NH.
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-10 in that the data source was revised from the American Public Health Association's External Cause of Injury Survey to the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Emergency Department Databases, which have external cause of injury codes so the proportion of ED records with external cause of injury codes can be calculated to better assess how well states are performing. Data for 15-10 were only available on a periodic basis, while data for this HP2020 objective are available annually.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2014, the original baseline was revised from 75.0% to 67.9% due to a change in the methodology. Originally, the programs that calculated the state-level rates using the SEDD did not focus solely on injury records. The program that calculated the national rates based on the NIS did. The programs modified their calculations to be consistent. The target remains the same.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Consensus Recommendations for using Hospital Discharge Data for Injury Surveillance. A Report from the Injury Surveillance Workgroup of the State and Territorial Injury Prevention Directors Association, Marietta (GA); 2003
    2. HCUP State Emergency Department Databases, AHRQ.
  • IVP-7 Increase the proportion of States and the District of Columbia with statewide hospital discharge data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes for 90 percent or more of injury-related discharges

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Inpatient Databases
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    64.3 (2008)
    Target: 
    85.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Current data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Emergency Department Databases (HCUP SEDDs) suggest that in their data sets, several States have external-cause-of-injury coding of 80 to 89 percent of injury-related emergency department records. During the next decade, AHRQ HCUP likely will add data from more States in which case the proportion may change.
    Numerator: 

    Number of states with statewide hospital discharge data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes (ICD-9-CM E codes E800-E848, E850-E999) on 90% or more of injury-related hospital discharge records; i.e., records where the principal diagnosis was an injury (ICD-9-CM codes 800-909.2, 909.4, 909.9, 910-994.9, 995.5-995.59, 995.80-995.85)

    Denominator: 

    Number of states with statewide hospital discharge data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes on injury-related hospital discharge records; i.e., records where the principal diagnosis was an injury

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SIDs) provide the best available centralized data sources for estimating the percentage of external-cause-of-injury coded hospital discharge records from state-based hospital discharge data systems. Forty states now participate in the HCUP SIDs. The District of Columbia has an HDDS, but does not participate at this time.

    Trend Issues: 
    The number of states with statewide emergency department data systems that routinely collect external-cause-of-injury codes on injury-related ED records varies from year to year. 2008: 28 states excluding AL, AK, AR, CO, DE, DC, ID, IL, LA, MI, MS, MT, ND, NM, NV, OK, OR, PA, TX, VA, WA, WV, WY, 2009: 29 states excluding AL, AK, AR, CO, DE, DC, ID, LA, MI, MS, MT, ND, NM, NV, OK, OR, PA, TX, VA, WA, WV, WY, 2010: 28 states excluding AL, AK, AR, CO, DE, DC, ID, LA, ME, MI, MS, MT, ND, NH, NM, OK, OR, PA, TX, VA, WA, WV, WY, and 2011: 29 states excluding AL, AK, AR, CO, DE, DC, HI, ID, LA, MI, MS, MT, NH, NM, OK, OR, PA, TX, VA, WA, WV, WY.
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-11 in that the data source was revised from the American Public Health Association's External Cause of Injury Survey to the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Inpatient Databases, which have external cause of injury codes so the proportion of ED records with external cause of injury codes can be calculated to better assess how well states are performing. Data for 15-11 were only available on a periodic basis, while data for this HP2020 objective are available annually.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2014, the original baseline was revised from 66.7% to 64.3% due to a change in the methodology. Originally, the programs that calculated the state-level rates using the SID did not focus solely on injury records. The program that calculated the national rates based on the NIS did. The programs modified their calculations to be consistent. The target remains the same.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Consensus Recommendations for using Hospital Discharge Data for Injury Surveillance. A Report from the Injury Surveillance Workgroup of the State and Territorial Injury Prevention Directors Association, Marietta (GA); 2003
    2. HCUP State Inpatient Databases, AHRQ.
  • IVP-8 Increase access to trauma care in the United States

    • IVP-8.1 Increase the proportion of the population residing within the continental United States with access to trauma care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      83.1 (2009)
      Target: 
      91.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons in the continental United States with trauma center access within 1 hour

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons in the continental United States

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Trauma Information Exchange Program (TIEP) maps from the American Trauma Society (ATS) in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania was established in 2000 and has been supported by CDC. The mission of TIEP is to foster the exchange and use of information to improve trauma care. To fulfill its mission, TIEP has developed and maintains a national inventory of trauma centers and systems.

        Future work proposes to further refine and enhance the ability to accurately measure geographic and population access to trauma care in the US.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective was archived in 2016. In 2012, the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) reorganized in an effort to divert limited resources away from response injury activities and focus more on injury prevention activities. The data used to calculate trauma center coverage (part of injury response activities) are no longer being purchased since the Center priorities have shifted.
    • IVP-8.2 Increase the proportion of the land mass of the continental United States with access to trauma care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      28.7 (2009)
      Target: 
      31.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Land mass of the continental United States with trauma center access within 1 hour

      Denominator: 

      Entire land mass of the continental United States

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Trauma Information Exchange Program (TIEP) maps from the American Trauma Society (ATS) in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania was established in 2000 and has been supported by CDC. The mission of TIEP is to foster the exchange and use of information to improve trauma care. To fulfill its mission, TIEP has developed and maintains a national inventory of trauma centers and systems.

        Future work proposes to further refine and enhance the ability to accurately measure geographic and population access to trauma care in the US.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective was archived in 2016. In 2012, the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) reorganized in an effort to divert limited resources away from response injury activities and focus more on injury prevention activities. The data used to calculate trauma center coverage (part of injury response activities) are no longer being purchased since the Center priorities have shifted.
  • IVP-9 Prevent an increase in poisoning deaths

    • IVP-9.1 Prevent an increase in poisoning deaths among all persons

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      13.2 (2007)
      Target: 
      13.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Maintain the baseline value.
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The overall poisoning death rate increased by 86 percent between 1999 and 2007. The target of maintaining the baseline is proposed because aiming to reduce the rate is too ambitious.
      Numerator: 

      Number of poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes *U01.6-*U01.7, X40-X49, X60-X69, X85-X90, Y10-Y19, Y35.2)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes *U01.6-*U01.7, X40-X49, X60-X69, X85-X90, Y10-Y19, Y35.2)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 13.1 to 13.2. The target was adjusted from 13.1 to 13.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
    • IVP-9.2 Prevent an increase in poisoning deaths among persons aged 35 to 54 years

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      25.6 (2007)
      Target: 
      25.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Maintain the baseline value.
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The target for this objective is to keep the death rates level with the baseline rates. The death rate for poisoning among persons aged 35-54 years has increased over 66% since 2000; therefore, setting a target that is a reduction in the rate is overly ambitious.
      Numerator: 

      Number of poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes *U01.6-*U01.7, X40-X49, X60-X69, X85-X90, Y10-Y19, Y35.2) among persons aged 35 to 54 years.

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 35 to 54 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      Healthy People 2010 objective 15-8, which tracks poisoning deaths among all ages, was retained as Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-9.1. This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-8 in that this objective tracks poisoning deaths among the high risk age group, adults aged 35-54 years.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      Number of poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes *U01.6-*U01.7, X40-X49, X60-X69, X85-X90, Y10-Y19, Y35.2) among persons aged 35 to 54 years.

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 35 to 54 years

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 25.5 to 25.6. The target was adjusted from 25.5 to 25.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
    • IVP-9.3 Prevent an increase in poisoning deaths caused by unintentional or undetermined intent among all persons

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      11.1 (2007)
      Target: 
      11.1
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Maintain the baseline value.
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The death rate for unintentional and undetermined intent poisonings more than doubled between 1999 and 2007. The target of maintaining the baseline is proposed because aiming to reduce the rate is too ambitious.
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional or undetermined poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes X40-X49, Y10-Y19)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      Healthy People 2010 objective 15-8, which tracks all poisoning deaths, was retained as Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-9.1. This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-8 in that this objective tracks poisoning deaths caused by unintentional or undetermined intent.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional or undetermined poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes X40-X49, Y10-Y19)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
    • IVP-9.4 Prevent an increase in poisoning deaths caused by unintentional or undetermined intent among persons aged 35 to 54 years

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      21.6 (2007)
      Target: 
      21.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Maintain the baseline value.
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The death rate for unintentional and undetermined intent poisonings among persons aged 35 to 54 years about doubled between 1999 and 2007. The target of maintaining the baseline is proposed because aiming to reduce the rate is too ambitious.
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional or undetermined poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes X40-X49, Y10-Y19) among persons aged 35 to 54 years

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 35 to 54 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      Healthy People 2010 objective 15-8, which tracks all poisoning deaths among all ages, was retained as Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-9.1. This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-8 in that this objective tracks poisoning deaths caused by unintentional or undetermined intent among the high risk age group, adults aged 35-54 years.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional or undetermined poisoning deaths (ICD-10 codes X40-X49, Y10-Y19) among persons aged 35 to 54 years

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 35 to 54 years

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
  • IVP-10 Prevent an increase in nonfatal poisonings

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    304.8 (2008)
    Target: 
    304.8
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Maintain the baseline value.
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    The target for this objective is to keep the age-adjusted rate level with the baseline rate. The age-adjusted rate has increased 17% since 2001; therefore, setting a target that is a reduction in the rate is overly ambitious.
    Numerator: 

    Number of initial hospital emergency department visits for nonfatal poisonings

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Poisoning is defined as ingestion, inhalation, injection, or cutaneous absorption of a drug, toxin (biologic or non-biologic), or other chemical agent in a quantity sufficient to cause a harmful effect. This category does not include harmful effects from normal therapeutic drugs (i.e., unexpected adverse effects to a drug administered correctly to treat a condition) or food poisoning.

      NEISS does not use ICD codes. However, reporters are given extensive training and report any poisoning cases in the emergency department record. A detailed description of the methods for coding poisoning injuries has been published elsewhere.

      Data by race are not reported because multiple race data are not typically available from the emergency department records.

      Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the new bridged-race postcensal population estimates of the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+
      • Sex: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-7 in that the data source for nonfatal poisonings was changed from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program to produce more reliable estimates.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2008 and 2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator. The original baseline was revised from 304.4 to 304.8. The target was adjusted from 304.4 to 304.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Annest JL et. Al. A Training Module for Coding Mechanism and Intent of Injury for the NEISS All Injury Program. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC, Atlanta, GA. September 25, 2009.
    2. CPSC. Coding Manual for All Trauma NEISS. US Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD. January, 2007.
  • IVP-11 Reduce unintentional injury deaths

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    40.4 (2007)
    Target: 
    36.4
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of deaths caused by unintentional injury (ICD-10 codes V01-X59, Y85-Y86)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Numerator: 

    Number of deaths caused by unintentional injury (ICD-10 codes V01-X59, Y85-Y86)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 40.0 to 40.4. The target was adjusted from 36.0 to 36.4 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
  • IVP-12 Reduce nonfatal unintentional injuries

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    9,233.5 (2008)
    Target: 
    8,310.1
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of initial hospital emergency department visits for nonfatal unintentional injuries

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      NEISS does not use ICD codes. However, reporters are given extensive training and report any unintentional injury cases in the emergency department record.

      Data by race are not reported because multiple race data are not typically available from the emergency department records.

      Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the new bridged-race postcensal population estimates of the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+
      • Sex: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2008 and 2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator. The original baseline was revised from 9,219.3 to 9,233.5. The target was adjusted from 8,297.4 to 8310.1 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
  • IVP-13 Reduce motor vehicle crash-related deaths

    • IVP-13.1 Reduce motor vehicle crash-related deaths per 100,000 population

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      13.8 (2007)
      Target: 
      12.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths [ICD-10 codes V02-V04 (.1, .9), V09.2, V12-V14 (.3-.9), V19 (.4-.6), V20-V28 (.3-.9), V29-V79 (.4-.9), V80 (.3-.5), V81.1, V82.1, V83-V86 (.0-.3), V87 (.0-.8), V89.2]

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of motor vehicle traffic-related deaths [ICD-10 codes V02-V04 (.1, .9), V09.2, V12-V14 (.3-.9), V19 (.4-.6), V20-V28 (.3-.9), V29-V79 (.4-.9), V80 (.3-.5), V81.1, V82.1, V83-V86 (.0-.3), V87 (.0-.8), V89.2]

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

          FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
    • IVP-13.2 Reduce motor vehicle crash-related deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Fatality Analysis Reporting System
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      per 100,000,000 vehicle miles traveled
      Baseline (Year): 
      1.3 (2008)
      Target: 
      1.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of motor vehicle crash deaths reported in FARS

      Denominator: 

      Total vehicle miles traveled

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FARS contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes abstracted from official state documents, including police accident reports, state vehicle registration files, state driver license files, state highway department data, vital statistics data, death certificates, Coroner/Medical Examiner reports, hospital medical records, emergency medical service reports, and other state records. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public, and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a nonoccupant within 30 days of the crash.

        The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) estimates total vehicle miles traveled using an algorithm that includes gas sales, vehicle registration, vehicle fuel economy data, and other data from the Highway Performance Monitoring System.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Fatality Analysis Reporting System
      Measure: 
      per 100,000,000 vehicle miles traveled
      Numerator: 

      Number of motor vehicle crash deaths reported in FARS

      Denominator: 

      Total vehicle miles traveled

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FARS contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes abstracted from official state documents, including police accident reports, state vehicle registration files, state driver license files, state highway department data, vital statistics data, death certificates, Coroner/Medical Examiner reports, hospital medical records, emergency medical service reports, and other state records. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public, and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a nonoccupant within 30 days of the crash.

          The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) estimates total vehicle miles traveled using an algorithm that includes gas sales, vehicle registration, vehicle fuel economy data, and other data from the Highway Performance Monitoring System.

  • IVP-14 Reduce nonfatal motor vehicle crash-related injuries

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) General Estimates System (GES)
    Population Estimates
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    771.4 (2008)
    Target: 
    694.3
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of nonfatal motor vehicle crash-related injuries reported in police reports

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      NASS GES data are from a nationally representative sample of police-reported motor vehicle crashes. To be included, the crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a traffic way and involve property damage, injury, or death.

      Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the latest Vintage for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

  • IVP-15 Increase use of safety belts

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Occupant Protection Use Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    84 (2009)
    Target: 
    92
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons observed using restraints

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      NOPUS uses observational data collected at intersections, highway ramps, and parking lots. Four observers (each responsible for a different seat in the vehicle) report occupant restraint use.

      Data by race and age are not reported because race and age are subjectively assessed by roadside observers and are, therefore, considered unreliable.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the target was revised from 92.4 to 92 due to the available precision of the baseline value. The baseline value is 84, not 84.0.
  • IVP-16 Increase age-appropriate vehicle restraint system use in children

    • IVP-16.1 Increase age-appropriate vehicle restraint system use in children aged 0 to 12 months

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey on the Use of Booster Seats
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      86 (2008)
      Target: 
      95
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of children aged 0 to 12 months observed in rear-facing child safety seats

      Denominator: 

      Number of children aged 0 to 12 months

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        NSUBS uses observational data collected at a probability sample of gas stations, day care centers, recreation centers, and restaurants in five national fast-food chains across the United States. The choice of these types of data collection sites stems from the necessity of observing restraint use from a close range in a slow-moving or stopped vehicle (as is required in order to distinguish a seat belt being used in conjunction with a backless booster seat from a seat belt being used alone), combined with the desire to capture large numbers of children.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      NHTSA recommends that infants should be kept in rear-facing child safety seats in the back seat until a minimum of age 1 and at least 20 pounds, but preferably not until they have reached the manufacturer’s height or weight limit. Due to the limited sample size of this study, restraint type use could not be analyzed simultaneously by the age and weight requirements.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-20, which tracked child restraint use among children

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT). National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) National Center for Statistics and Analysis. Child Restraint Use in 2008 – Use of Correct Restraint Types. Traffic Safety Facts. Research Note DOT HS 811 132. May 2009.
    • IVP-16.2 Increase age-appropriate vehicle restraint system use in children aged 1 to 3 years

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey on the Use of Booster Seats
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      72 (2008)
      Target: 
      79
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of children aged 1 to 3 years observed in front-facing child safety seats

      Denominator: 

      Number of children aged 1 to 3 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        NSUBS uses observational data collected at a probability sample of gas stations, day care centers, recreation centers, and restaurants in five national fast-food chains across the United States. The choice of these types of data collection sites stems from the necessity of observing restraint use from a close range in a slow-moving or stopped vehicle (as is required in order to distinguish a seat belt being used in conjunction with a backless booster seat from a seat belt being used alone), combined with the desire to capture large numbers of children.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      NHTSA recommends that when children outgrow their rear-facing seats (at a minimum age 1 and at least 20 pounds, but preferably not until they have reached the manufacturer’s height or weight limit) they should ride in forward-facing child safety seats, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limit of the particular seat (usually at around age 4 and 40 pounds). Due to the limited sample size of this study, restraint type use could not be analyzed simultaneously by the age and weight requirements.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-20, which tracked child restraint use among children

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT). National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) National Center for Statistics and Analysis. Child Restraint Use in 2008 – Use of Correct Restraint Types. Traffic Safety Facts. Research Note DOT HS 811 132. May 2009.
    • IVP-16.3 Increase age-appropriate vehicle restraint system use in children aged 4 to 7 years

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey on the Use of Booster Seats
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      43 (2008)
      Target: 
      47
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of children aged 4 to 7 years observed in high-backed or backless booster seats

      Denominator: 

      Number of children aged 4 to 7 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        NSUBS uses observational data collected at a probability sample of gas stations, day care centers, recreation centers, and restaurants in five national fast-food chains across the United States. The choice of these types of data collection sites stems from the necessity of observing restraint use from a close range in a slow-moving or stopped vehicle (as is required in order to distinguish a seat belt being used in conjunction with a backless booster seat from a seat belt being used alone), combined with the desire to capture large numbers of children.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      NHTSA recommends that once children outgrow their forward-facing seats (usually at around age 4 and 40 pounds), they should ride in booster seats, in the back seat, until the vehicle seat belts fit properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs and the shoulder belt fits across the chest (usually at age 8 or when they are 4’9” tall). Due to the limited sample size of this study, restraint type use could not be analyzed simultaneously by the age and height requirements.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-20, which tracked child restraint use among children

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT). National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) National Center for Statistics and Analysis. Child Restraint Use in 2008 – Use of Correct Restraint Types. Traffic Safety Facts. Research Note DOT HS 811 132. May 2009.
    • IVP-16.4 Increase age-appropriate vehicle restraint system use in children aged 8 to 12 years

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Survey on the Use of Booster Seats
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      78 (2008)
      Target: 
      86
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of children aged 8 to 12 years observed using seat belts

      Denominator: 

      Number of children aged 8 to 12 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        NSUBS uses observational data collected at a probability sample of gas stations, day care centers, recreation centers, and restaurants in five national fast-food chains across the United States. The choice of these types of data collection sites stems from the necessity of observing restraint use from a close range in a slow-moving or stopped vehicle (as is required in order to distinguish a seat belt being used in conjunction with a backless booster seat from a seat belt being used alone), combined with the desire to capture large numbers of children.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      NHTSA recommends that children can graduate from booster seats to seat belts once they fit properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs and the shoulder belt fits across the chest (usually at age 8 or when they are 4’9” tall). Due to the limited sample size of this study, restraint type use could not be analyzed simultaneously by the age and height requirements.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-20, which tracked child restraint use among children

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT). National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) National Center for Statistics and Analysis. Child Restraint Use in 2008 – Use of Correct Restraint Types. Traffic Safety Facts. Research Note DOT HS 811 132. May 2009.
  • IVP-17 Increase the number of States and the District of Columbia with “good” graduated driver licensing (GDL) laws

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    number
    Baseline (Year): 
    32 (2009)
    Target: 
    51
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Total coverage
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Progress has been made over the past several years in strengthening graduated driver licensing (GDL) laws. The number of States with GDL systems increased from 23 in 1999 to 50 in 2007; only North Dakota lacked a GDL system. In 1999, only three States had “good” GDL laws. During the past decade, an additional 33 States enacted “good” systems. Based on this trend, a target of total coverage is proposed. (Note: Small differences in numbers result from counting States based on the[n21] date the legislation was passed.)
    Numerator: 

    Number of states and the District of Columbia with “good” Graduated Drivers Licensing Laws as defined by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      For each state, points are assigned for the key components of graduated licensing. "Good" systems scored 6 or more points; "Fair" systems scored 4 or 5; "Marginal" systems 2 or 3; and "Poor" ones scored less than 2 points.

      Regardless of point totals, no state was rated above "marginal" if intermediate license holders could be younger than age16 or if it allowed unrestricted driving before age 16 years, 6 months.

      The following schedule was used to assign points:

      • Learner's entry age: 1 point for learner's entry age 16+ years.
      • Learner's holding period: 2 points for 6+ months; 1 point for 3-5 months; none for <3 months
      • Practice driving certification: 1 point for 30+ hours; none for <30 hours.
      • Night driving restriction: 2 points for 9 or 10 pm; 1 point for after 10 pm.
      • Passenger restriction: 2 points for no or 1 underage passenger; 1 point for 2 passengers; none for 3; where supervising driver may be under age 21, point values were determined including the supervising driver as a passenger.
      • Driver education: Where completion of driver education changed a requirement, point values were determined for the driver education track.
      • Duration of restrictions: 1 point if difference between minimum unrestricted license age and minimum intermediate license age is 12 or more months; night driving and passenger restrictions were valued independently.
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-22 in that the definition was modified to from the number of the states with graduated driver licensing laws to the number of states with such laws rated as “good” based on the criteria set by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 35 to 32 states due to a change in the methodology. The data year is now based on the effective date of the state law instead of the passage date. The target of 51 states did not change. In 2014, this objective was archived because while IIHS continues to track the content of GDL laws, it has discontinued efforts to rate the quality of the GDL laws overall. Instead, it tracks the law components and outlines tailored opportunities for improvement in every state (http://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/laws/graduatedlicenseintro?topicName=teenagers) using a “GDL calculator” (http://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/laws/gdl_calculator?topicName=teenagers). Rating the quality of GDL laws in states is complex because of the number of components that make up these systems, how these components are structured, and the ways in which they are combined. The science on GDL effectiveness is rapidly growing – and there are gaps in our knowledge about specific GDL components, and the calibrations of these components that would be associated with the largest crash reductions. Thus, our understanding is continually evolving, and it is difficult to identify, in a consistent manner, over time, the components that represent a “good” law. This limits the ability to construct a new metric and source of data.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

  • IVP-18 Reduce pedestrian deaths on public roads

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Fatality Analysis Reporting System
    Population Estimates
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    1.5 (2008)
    Target: 
    1.4
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of pedestrian deaths reported in FARS

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      FARS contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes abstracted from official state documents, including police accident reports, state vehicle registration files, state driver license files, state highway department data, vital statistics data, death certificates (coded to ICD-10 V02-V04 (.1, .9), and V09.2), Coroner/Medical Examiner reports, hospital medical records, emergency medical service reports, and other state records. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public, and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a nonoccupant within 30 days of the crash. FARS data do not include pedestrian deaths on private roadways, such as driveways. Driveways are a common location for pedestrian deaths for pedestrians aged 0-2 years.

      Since FARS uses additional information in determining the cause of death and only includes deaths that occurred within 30 days of the crash, data from FARS may not be directly comparable to data published in National Vital Statistics Reports.

      Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the latest Vintage for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Fatality Analysis Reporting System
    Population Estimates
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Numerator: 

    Number of pedestrian deaths reported in FARS

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        FARS contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes abstracted from official state documents, including police accident reports, state vehicle registration files, state driver license files, state highway department data, vital statistics data, death certificates (coded to ICD-10 V02-V04 (.1, .9), and V09.2), Coroner/Medical Examiner reports, hospital medical records, emergency medical service reports, and other state records. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public, and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a nonoccupant within 30 days of the crash. FARS data do not include pedestrian deaths on private roadways, such as driveways. Driveways are a common location for pedestrian deaths for pedestrians aged 0-2 years.

        Since FARS uses additional information in determining the cause of death and only includes deaths that occurred within 30 days of the crash, data from FARS may not be directly comparable to data published in National Vital Statistics Reports.

        Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the latest Vintage for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

  • IVP-19 Reduce nonfatal pedestrian injuries on public roads

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) General Estimates System (GES)
    Population Estimates
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    22.6 (2008)
    Target: 
    20.3
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of nonfatal pedestrian injuries reported in police reports

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      NASS GES data are from a nationally representative sample of police-reported motor vehicle crashes. To be included, the crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a traffic way and involve property damage, injury, or death.

      Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the latest Vintage for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

  • IVP-20 Reduce pedalcyclist deaths on public roads

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Fatality Analysis Reporting System
    Population Estimates
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    0.24 (2008)
    Target: 
    0.22
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of pedalcyclist deaths reported in FARS

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      FARS contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes abstracted from official state documents, including police accident reports, state vehicle registration files, state driver license files, state highway department data, vital statistics data, death certificates, Coroner/Medical Examiner reports, hospital medical records, emergency medical service reports, and other state records. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public, and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a nonoccupant within 30 days of the crash. FARS data do not include pedalcyclist deaths on private roadways, such as driveways.

      Since FARS uses additional information in determining the cause of death and only includes deaths that occurred within 30 days of the crash, data from FARS may not be directly comparable to data published in National Vital Statistics Reports.

      Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the latest Vintage for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Fatality Analysis Reporting System
    Population Estimates
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Numerator: 

    Number of pedalcyclist deaths reported in FARS

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        FARS contains data on a census of fatal traffic crashes abstracted from official state documents, including police accident reports, state vehicle registration files, state driver license files, state highway department data, vital statistics data, death certificates, Coroner/Medical Examiner reports, hospital medical records, emergency medical service reports, and other state records. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a trafficway customarily open to the public, and must result in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a nonoccupant within 30 days of the crash. FARS data do not include pedalcyclist deaths on private roadways, such as driveways.

        Since FARS uses additional information in determining the cause of death and only includes deaths that occurred within 30 days of the crash, data from FARS may not be directly comparable to data published in National Vital Statistics Reports.

        Rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the latest Vintage for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

  • IVP-21 Increase the number of States and the District of Columbia with laws requiring bicycle helmets for bicycle riders

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    number
    Baseline (Year): 
    19 (2009)
    Target: 
    27
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    During the past decade (1999–2009), eight States passed laws requiring bicycle helmet use by riders less than 15 years of age. Another eight States are expected add bicycle helmet laws during the next decade.
    Numerator: 

    Number of states and the District of Columbia with laws requiring bicycle helmet use by riders under age 15 years

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
  • IVP-22 Increase the proportion of motorcycle operators and passengers using helmets

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Occupant Protection Use Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    67 (2009)
    Target: 
    74
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of motorcycle operators and passengers observed wearing helmets

    Denominator: 

    Number of motorcycle operators and passengers observed

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      NOPUS uses observational data collected at intersections, highway ramps, and parking lots. Four observers (each responsible for a different seat in cars, two observers for motorcycles) report occupant helmet use.

      Data by race and age are not reported because race and age are subjectively assessed by roadside observers and are, therefore, considered unreliable.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the target was revised from 73.7 to 74 due to the available precision of the baseline value. The baseline value is 67, not 67.0.
  • IVP-23 Prevent an increase in fall-related deaths

    • IVP-23.1 Prevent an increase in fall-related deaths among all persons

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      7.2 (2007)
      Target: 
      7.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Maintain the baseline value.
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The overall fall-related death rate increased by 46 percent between 1999 and 2007. The target of maintaining the baseline is proposed because aiming to reduce the rate is too ambitious.
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional deaths from falls (ICD-10 codes W00-W19)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional deaths from falls (ICD-10 codes W00-W19)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

          FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 7.0 to 7.2. The target was adjusted from 7.0 to 7.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
    • IVP-23.2 Prevent an increase in fall-related deaths among adults aged 65 years and older

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      47.0 (2007)
      Target: 
      47.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Maintain the baseline value.
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      The fall-related death rate among persons aged 65 years and older increased 54 percent between 1999 and 2007. The target of maintaining the baseline is proposed because aiming to reduce the rate is too ambitious.
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional deaths from falls (ICD-10 codes W00-W19) among adults aged 65 years and over

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 65 years and over

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      Healthy People 2010 objective 15-27, which tracks deaths from unintentional falls among all ages, was retained as Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-23.1. This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-27 in that it is limited to adults aged 65 and over, the age group at highest risk of unintentional falls.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional deaths from falls (ICD-10 codes W00-W19) among adults aged 65 years and over

      Denominator: 

      Number of adults aged 65 years and over

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 45.3 to 47.0. The target was adjusted from 45.3 to 47.0 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2014, the 2007-2010 data were revised due to a programming error in the age adjustment of the original data, affecting the SE's and data by marital status. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
  • IVP-24 Reduce unintentional suffocation deaths

    • IVP-24.1 Reduce unintentional suffocation deaths among all persons

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      2.0 (2007)
      Target: 
      1.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional suffocation deaths (ICD-10 codes W75-W84)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-9 in that the definition was modified from all suffocation deaths to unintentional suffocation deaths.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional suffocation deaths (ICD-10 codes W75-W84)

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 1.9 to 2.0. The target was adjusted from 1.7 to 1.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
    • IVP-24.2 Reduce unintentional suffocation deaths among infants 0 to 12 months

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Baseline (Year): 
      23.1 (2007)
      Target: 
      20.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional suffocation deaths (ICD-10 codes W75-W84) among infants aged 0-12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of infants aged 0-12 months

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-9 in that the definition was modified from all suffocation deaths among all ages to unintentional suffocation deaths among the high risk age group, infants 0-12 months.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional suffocation deaths (ICD-10 codes W75-W84) among infants aged 0-12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of infants aged 0-12 months

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 22.5 to 23.1. The target was adjusted from 20.3 to 20.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
    • IVP-24.3 Reduce unintentional suffocation deaths among persons aged 65 years and older

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Baseline (Year): 
      8.3 (2007)
      Target: 
      7.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional suffocation deaths (ICD-10 codes W75-W84) among persons aged 65 years and over

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 65 years and over

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-9 in that the definition was modified from all suffocation deaths among all ages to unintentional suffocation deaths among the high risk age group, adults 65+ years.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Bridged-race Population Estimates
      National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
      Measure: 
      per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
      Numerator: 

      Number of unintentional suffocation deaths (ICD-10 codes W75-W84) among persons aged 65 years and over

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 65 years and over

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

          FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        Age Adjustment Notes: 

        This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

        • Total: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Sex: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Country of Birth: 65-74, 75+
        • Geographic Location: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
        • Marital Status: 65-74, 75+
      Trend Issues: 
      Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 8.0 to 8.3. The target was adjusted from 7.2 to 7.5 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2007–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2014, the 2007-2010 data were revised due to a programming error in the age adjustment of the original data, affecting the SE's and data by marital status. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
  • IVP-25 Reduce drowning deaths

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    1.2 (2007)
    Target: 
    1.1
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of drowning deaths (ICD-10 codes V90, V92, W65-W74)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Numerator: 

    Number of drowning deaths (ICD-10 codes V90, V92, W65-W74)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
  • IVP-26 Reduce sports and recreation injuries

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 1,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    46.6 (2008)
    Target: 
    41.9
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of medically consulted injury episodes in the last 5 weeks that resulted from engaging in sports and exercise or leisure activities

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      What activity [fill1: were you/was ALIAS] involved in at the time of the [fill2: injury/poisoning]?

      1. Driving or riding in a motor vehicle
      2. Working at a paid job
      3. Working around the house or yard
      4. Attending school
      5. Unpaid work (such as volunteer work)
      6. Sports and exercise
      7. Leisure activity (excluding sports)
      8. Sleeping, resting, eating, or drinking
      9. Cooking
      10. Being cared for (hands-on care from other person)
      11. Other, please specify
      12. Refused
      13. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Only injury episodes that occurred 5 weeks or less before the interview are included. Elapsed time in days is based on the variable RPD. Values are imputed if the exact date was not reported. Each 5-week estimate is annualized by multiplying by 10.4 after weighting to reflect the national estimate.

      Up to two activities could be selected for the same injury event.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Income (percent poverty threshold): <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Family Type: <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Country of Birth: <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Health Insurance Status: <18, 18-44, 45-54, 55-64
      • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 45.6 to 46.6 due to a revision of a programming error. The original baseline included one instead of both activities reported for the same injury event. The target was adjusted from 41.0 to 41.9 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Chen LH, Warner M, Fingerhut L, Makuc D. Injury episodes and circumstances: National Health Interview Survey, 1997–2007. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 10(241). 2009.
    2. Coles RH, Barnes P, Fingerhut LA, et al. Imputation of missing date information for injuries and poisonings reported in the National Health Interview Survey. In: Proceedings of the NorthEast SAS® Users Group nineteenth annual conference. 2006.
  • IVP-27 Increase the proportion of public and private schools that require students to wear appropriate protective gear when engaged in school-sponsored physical activities

    • IVP-27.1 Increase the proportion of public and private schools that require students to wear appropriate protective gear when engaged in school-sponsored physical education

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      School Health Policies and Practices Study
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      76.8 (2006)
      Target: 
      84.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of public and private schools that require students to wear appropriate protective gear when engaged in physical education classes

      Denominator: 

      Number of public and private schools

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Must students wear appropriate protective gear during required physical education?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Students do not engage in any physical activities that require protective gear
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Starting with the 2012 survey, the name of the SHPPS survey was changed from the School Health Policies and Programs Study to the School Health Policies and Practices Study.

    • IVP-27.2 Increase the proportion of public and private schools that require students to wear appropriate protective gear when engaged in school-sponsored intramural activities or physical activity clubs

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      School Health Policies and Practices Study
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      85.8 (2006)
      Target: 
      94.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of public and private schools that require students to wear appropriate protective gear when engaged in intramural activities or physical activity clubs

      Denominator: 

      Number of public and private schools

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Must students wear appropriate protective gear when engaged in intramural activities or
        physical activity clubs?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Students do not engage in any intramural activities or physical activity clubs that require protective gear
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Periodic
      Methodology Notes: 

        Starting with the 2012 survey, the name of the SHPPS survey was changed from the School Health Policies and Programs Study to the School Health Policies and Practices Study.

  • IVP-28 Reduce residential fire deaths

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    0.95 (2007)
    Target: 
    0.86
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of unintentional fire-related injury deaths occurring in residential homes (ICD-10 codes X00-X09, location=home)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Unintentional injury deaths related to fires in residential homes (ICD-10 codes X00-X09, location=home).

      FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Numerator: 

    Number of unintentional fire-related injury deaths occurring in residential homes (ICD-10 codes X00-X09, location=home)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        Unintentional injury deaths related to fires in residential homes (ICD-10 codes X00-X09, location=home).

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
  • IVP-29 Reduce homicides
    LHI

    Leading Health Indicators are a subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives selected to communicate high-priority health issues.

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    6.1 (2007)
    Target: 
    5.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of deaths due to homicide (ICD-10 codes *U01-*U02, X85-Y09, Y87.1)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Leading Health Indicator:
    Methodology Notes: 

      FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Numerator: 

    Number of deaths due to homicide (ICD-10 codes *U01-*U02, X85-Y09, Y87.1)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Homicide

    2. Fowler PJ, Tompsett CJ, Braciszewski JM, Jacques-Tiura AJ, Baltes BB. Community violence: A meta-analysis on the effect of exposure and mental health outcomes of children and adolescents. Dev Psychopathol. 2009;21:227-259.
    3. Johnson SL, Solomon BS, Shields WC, McDonald EM, McKenzie LB, Gielen AC. Neighborhood violence and its association with mothers' health: assessing the relative importance of perceived safety and exposure to violence. J Urban Health. 2009;86:538-550.
    4. Sellström E, Bremberg S. The significance of neighbourhood context to child and adolescent health and well-being: A systematic review of multilevel studies. Scand J Public Health. 2006;34:544-554.
  • IVP-30 Reduce firearm-related deaths

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    10.3 (2007)
    Target: 
    9.3
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of firearm-related deaths (ICD-10 codes *U01.4, W32-W34, X72-X74, X93-X95, Y22-Y24, Y35.0)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Vital Statistics System-Mortality
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments) (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Numerator: 

    Number of firearm-related deaths (ICD-10 codes *U01.4, W32-W34, X72-X74, X93-X95, Y22-Y24, Y35.0)

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

        FOR MULTIPLE DATA YEARS: Death rates are calculated based on the sum of the resident populations for each of the data years involved (e.g. the denominator of a rate for 2008-2010 combined is the sum of the population estimates for 2008, 2009, and 2010). For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Postcensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for years after a census year and match the data year vintage (e.g. July 1, 2011 resident population estimates from Vintage 2011 are used as the denominator for 2011 rates). Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Race-specific population estimates for 1991 and later use bridged-race categories.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Country of Birth: <5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: <1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Marital Status: 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75+
    Trend Issues: 
    Mortality data by marital status were not available for 60% of Georgia’s records in 2008 and 94% of Georgia’s records in 2009. Therefore, 2008 and 2009 data by marital status should be interpreted with caution.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2007–2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator to provide more accurate rates for the period. Thus, the original baseline was revised from 10.2 to 10.3. The target was adjusted from 9.2 to 9.3 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. Note that all mortality rates shown here for 2001–2009 (or any subset of those years) are based on intercensal population estimates and may differ from those previously published on the Internet or in print. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged. In 2017, the estimates for geographic location were updated to reflect the 2013 urban/rural classification scheme.
  • IVP-31 Reduce nonfatal firearm-related injuries

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Electronic Injury Surveillance System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    20.7 (2007)
    Target: 
    18.6
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of nonfatal firearm-related cases treated in U.S. hospital emergency department records

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      A firearm-related injury is defined as a penetrating injury or gunshot wound from a weapon using a powder charge to fire a projectile.

      NEISS does not use ICD codes. However, reporters are given extensive training and report any gun-related injury cases in the emergency department record. Victims may also have other types of injuries, but if the incident involved a gun, it is included. Coders also attempt to capture data on intent, when appropriate information is provided in the medical record.

      Data by race are not reported because multiple race data are not typically available from the emergency department records.

      Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the new bridged-race postcensal population estimates of the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2007-2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator. However, the baseline estimate for the total population did not change so the target remained the same. Some baseline estimates for population subgroups were revised. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
  • IVP-32 Reduce nonfatal physical assault injuries

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    512.5 (2008)
    Target: 
    461.2
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of initial hospital emergency department visits for nonfatal physical assault injuries

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      A nonfatal physical assault injury is defined as an injury from an act of nonfatal violence where physical force by one or more persons is used with the intent of causing harm, injury or death to another person; intentional poisoning by another person. Both confirmed and suspected assaults are included.

      NEISS does not use ICD codes. However, reporters are given extensive training and report any poisoning cases in the emergency department record. A detailed description of the methods for coding poisoning injuries has been published elsewhere.

      Data by race are not reported because multiple race data are not typically available from the emergency department records.

      Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the new bridged-race postcensal population estimates of the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+
      • Sex: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2008 and 2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator. The original baseline was revised from 514.1 to 512.5. The target was adjusted from 462.7 to 461.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Annest JL et. Al. A Training Module for Coding Mechanism and Intent of Injury for the NEISS All Injury Program. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC, Atlanta, GA. September 25, 2009.
    2. CPSC. Coding Manual for All Trauma NEISS. US Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD. January, 2007.
  • IVP-33 Reduce physical assaults

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Crime Victimization Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 1,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    21.3 (2008)
    Target: 
    19.2
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 12 years and over who report being physically assaulted

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 12 years and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS-2 form):

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Did the offender hit you, knock you down or actually attack you in any way?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Did the offender TRY to attack you?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Did the offender THREATEN you with harm in any way?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      How did the offender TRY to attack you? How were you threatened? Any other way? Mark (X) all that apply. [applicable responses 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 (if injury), 13, 14 (certain circumstances)]

      1. Verbal threat of rape
      2. Verbal threat to kill
      3. Verbal threat of attack other than to kill or rape
      4. Verbal threat of sexual assault other than rape
      5. Unwanted sexual contact with force (grabbing, fondling, etc.)
      6. Unwanted sexual contact without force (grabbing, fondling, etc.)
      7. Weapon present or threatened with weapon
      8. Shot at (but missed)
      9. Attempted attack with knife/sharp weapon
      10. Attempted attack with weapon other than gun/knife/sharp weapon
      11. Object thrown at person
      12. Followed or surrounded
      13. Tried to hit, slap, knock down, grab, hold, trip, jump, push, etc.
      14. Other – Specify

      How were you attacked? Any other way? Mark (X) all that apply. [applicable responses 4-14]

      1. Raped
      2. Tried to rape
      3. Sexual assault other than rape or attempted rape
      4. Shot
      5. Shot at (but missed)
      6. Hit with gun held in hand
      7. Stabbed/cut with knife/sharp weapon
      8. Attempted attack with knife/sharp weapon
      9. Hit by object (other than gun) held in hand
      10. Hit by thrown object
      11. Attempted attack with weapon other than gun/knife/sharp weapon
      12. Hit, slapped, knocked down
      13. Grabbed, held, tripped, jumped, pushed, etc.
      14. Other – Specify
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Physical assaults include completed and attempted simple and aggravated assault or threats thereof identified as crimes.

    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-37 in that the threshold for series victimization was revised from six to ten or more similar crimes during the 6-month reference period.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 16.3 to 21.3 due to a change in the methodology. The threshold for series victimization was revised from six to ten or more similar crimes during the 6-month reference period that a victim is unable to recall individually. The target was adjusted from 14.7 to 19.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • IVP-34 Reduce physical fighting among adolescents

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    31.5 (2009)
    Target: 
    28.4
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of students in grades 9 through 12 who report being in a physical fight at least 1 time during the 12 months preceding the survey

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9 through 12

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      During the past 12 months, how many times were you in a physical fight?

      1. 0 times
      2. 1 time
      3. 2 or 3 times
      4. 4 or 5 times
      5. 6 or 7 times
      6. 8 or 9 times
      7. 10 or 11 times
      8. 12 or more times
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of students in grades 9 through 12 who report being in a physical fight at least 1 time during the 12 months preceding the survey

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9 through 12

    Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

        From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 12 months, how many times were you in a physical fight?

        1. 0 times
        2. 1 time
        3. 2 or 3 times
        4. 4 or 5 times
        5. 6 or 7 times
        6. 8 or 9 times
        7. 10 or 11 times
        8. 12 or more times
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
  • IVP-35 Reduce bullying among adolescents

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    19.9 (2009)
    Target: 
    17.9
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Students in grades 9-12 who have been bullied on school property in the past 12 months

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9-12

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      The next question asks about bullying. Bullying is when 1 or more students tease, threaten, spread rumors about, hit, shove, or hurt another student over and over again. It is not bullying when 2 students of about the same strength or power argue or fight or tease each other in a friendly way.

      During the past 12 months, have you ever been bullied on school property?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
    Methodology Notes: 

      This question was added to the national YRBS for the first time in 2009.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Students in grades 9-12 who have been bullied on school property in the past 12 months

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9-12

    Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

        From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        The next question asks about bullying. Bullying is when 1 or more students tease, threaten, spread rumors about, hit, shove, or hurt another student over and over again. It is not bullying when 2 students of about the same strength or power argue or fight or tease each other in a friendly way.

        During the past 12 months, have you ever been bullied on school property?

        1. Yes
        2. No
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
    Methodology Notes: 

        This question was added to the national YRBS for the first time in 2009.

  • IVP-36 Reduce weapon carrying by adolescents on school property

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    5.6 (2009)
    Target: 
    4.6
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Projection/trend analysis
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    According to the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, the proportion of high school students carrying weapons on school property declined from 11.8 percent in 1993 to 5.6 percent in 2009. Linear regression analysis using trend data between 1999 and 2009 supports the proposed target of 4.6 percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of students in grades 9 through 12 who report carrying a weapon on school property at least 1 day in the 30 days preceding the survey

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9 through 12

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      During the past 30 days, on how many days did you carry a weapon, such as a gun, knife, or club on school property?

      1. 0 days
      2. 1 day
      3. 2 or 3 days
      4. 4 or 5 days
      5. 6 or more days
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of students in grades 9 through 12 who report carrying a weapon on school property at least 1 day in the 30 days preceding the survey

    Denominator: 

    Students in grades 9 through 12

    Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

        From the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 30 days, on how many days did you carry a weapon, such as a gun, knife, or club on school property?

        1. 0 days
        2. 1 day
        3. 2 or 3 days
        4. 4 or 5 days
        5. 6 or more days
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
  • IVP-37 Reduce child maltreatment deaths

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System
    Population Estimates
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    2.3 (2008)
    Target: 
    2.1
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of reported child fatalities due to maltreatment among persons under 18 years of age

    Denominator: 

    Persons under 18 years of age

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Child fatality due to maltreatment is defined as the death of a child as a result of abuse or neglect, because either (a) an injury resulting from the abuse or neglect of a child was the cause of the death, or (b) abuse and/or neglect were contributing factors to the cause of death. Data on child fatalities are collected from all states; some state offices of child protective services work closely with health departments or the coroner’s office, whereas others rely more on their own records, including deaths reported to them by law enforcement. Only those fatalities that were known to CPS and reported in the Child File are included in these analyses.

      These are case-level data reported in the Child File and, therefore, are a subset of all child fatalities.

      Fatalities of an unknown age, including unborn children, are excluded.

      Child maltreatment death rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. For example, July 1, 2008 resident population estimates from Vintage 2008 are used as the denominator for 2008 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

    Trend Issues: 
    The number of reporting states varies from year to year. 2008: 42 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NH, NC, ND, OR, WA. 2009: 43 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, ND, OR, WA. 2010: 43 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, NH, OR, WA. 2011 and 2013: 44 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, OR, WA. 2012: 43 states excluding AK, CA, ID, ME, MA, NC, OR, WA. 2014: 44 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, OR, WA
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-33b in that the methodology for counting cases was revised. Healthy People 2010 data were based on both case level (Child File) and aggregated data (SDC and Agency files) and, therefore, include duplicate counts of victims while Healthy People 2020 data are based on case level data (Child File) only, allowing for unique counts of victims. At baseline 42 states provided case level data. Unlike Healthy People 2010 data, Healthy People 2020 data exclude victims with an unknown age, including unborn children.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System
    Population Estimates
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Numerator: 

    Number of reported child fatalities due to maltreatment among persons under 18 years of age

    Denominator: 

    Persons under 18 years of age

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        Child fatality due to maltreatment is defined as the death of a child as a result of abuse or neglect, because either (a) an injury resulting from the abuse or neglect of a child was the cause of the death, or (b) abuse and/or neglect were contributing factors to the cause of death. Data on child fatalities are collected from all states; some state offices of child protective services work closely with health departments or the coroner’s office, whereas others rely more on their own records, including deaths reported to them by law enforcement. Only those fatalities that were known to CPS and reported in the Child File are included in these analyses.

        These are case-level data reported in the Child File and, therefore, are a subset of all child fatalities.

        Fatalities of an unknown age, including unborn children, are excluded.

        Child maltreatment death rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. For example, July 1, 2008 resident population estimates from Vintage 2008 are used as the denominator for 2008 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

    Trend Issues: 
    The number of reporting states varies from year to year. 2008: 42 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NH, NC, ND, OR, WA. 2009: 43 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, ND, OR, WA. 2010: 43 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, NH, OR, WA. 2011 and 2013: 44 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, OR, WA. 2012: 43 states excluding AK, CA, ID, ME, MA, NC, OR, WA. 2014: 44 states excluding AK, CA, ME, MA, NC, OR, WA

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 2.4 to 2.3 due to a change in the methodology. Children of unknown age and unborns are now excluded. The target was adjusted from 2.2 to 2.1 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2015, the denominator data source, Population Estimates, was added to the Data Details. The baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
  • IVP-38 Reduce nonfatal child maltreatment

    About the Data: National

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System
    Population Estimates
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 1,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    9.4 (2008)
    Target: 
    8.5
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons under 18 years of age reported and confirmed to be victims of nonfatal maltreatment by State child welfare agencies

    Denominator: 

    Persons under 18 years of age

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Adapted from HP2010 objective
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Nonfatal maltreatment is defined as an act or failure to act by a parent, caretaker, other person, as defined under State law, which results in serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation, or an act or failure to act that presents an imminent risk of serious harm. State definitions may include additional criteria.

      A child is considered to have been a victim of maltreatment if a “substantiated,” “indicated,” or “alternative response victim” disposition was recorded.

      These are case-level data reported in the Child File and, therefore, are a subset of all children reported.

      Victims with an unknown age, including unborn children, are excluded.

      Nonfatal child maltreatment rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. For example, July 1, 2008 resident population estimates from Vintage 2008 are used as the denominator for 2008 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

    Trend Issues: 
    The number of reporting states varies from year to year. 2008 and 2009: 49 states excluding ND and OR. 2010 and 2011: 50 states excluding OR. 2012: 50 states excluding ID.
    Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
    This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 15-33a in that the definition was modified to track only nonfatal maltreatment to avoid overlap with the child maltreatment fatalities objective (IVP-37). The methodology for counting cases also was revised. Healthy People 2010 data were based on both case level (Child File) and aggregated data (SDC and Agency files) and, therefore, include duplicate counts of victims while Healthy People 2020 data are based on case level data (Child File) only allowing for unique counts of victims. At baseline 48 states provided case level data, representing 98.2% of the total victims reported to NCANDS. Unlike Healthy People 2010 data, Healthy People 2020 data exclude victims with an unknown age, including unborn children.

    About the Data: State

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

    Data Source: 
    National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System
    Population Estimates
    Measure: 
    per 1,000
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons under 18 years of age reported and confirmed to be victims of nonfatal maltreatment by State child welfare agencies

    Denominator: 

    Persons under 18 years of age

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

        Nonfatal maltreatment is defined as an act or failure to act by a parent, caretaker, other person, as defined under State law, which results in serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation, or an act or failure to act that presents an imminent risk of serious harm. State definitions may include additional criteria.

        A child is considered to have been a victim of maltreatment if a “substantiated,” “indicated,” or “alternative response victim” disposition was recorded.

        These are case-level data reported in the Child File and, therefore, are a subset of all children reported.

        Victims with an unknown age, including unborn children, are excluded.

        Nonfatal child maltreatment rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the resident population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the prior decennial census. For example, July 1, 2008 resident population estimates from Vintage 2008 are used as the denominator for 2008 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates.

    Trend Issues: 
    The number of reporting states varies from year to year. 2008 and 2009: 49 states excluding ND and OR. 2010 and 2011: 50 states excluding OR. 2012: 50 states excluding ID.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the methodology was revised to now exclude children of unknown age and unborns, but this did not impact the baseline or target display values. In 2015, the denominator data source, Population Estimates, was added to the Data Details. The baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.
  • IVP-39 (Developmental) Reduce violence by current or former intimate partners

    • IVP-39.1 (Developmental) Reduce physical violence by current or former intimate partners

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons reporting physical violence victimization by a current or former intimate partner in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 12 months, how many of your romantic or sexual partners have:

        • made threats to physically harm you?
        • slapped you?
        • pushed or shoved you?
        • hit you with a fist or something hard?
        • kicked you?
        • hurt you by pulling your hair?
        • slammed you against something?
        • forced you to engage in sexual activity?
        • tried to hurt you by choking or suffocating you?
        • beaten you?
        • burned you on purpose?
        • used a knife or gun on you?

        For each of the above behaviors that are endorsed, frequency information is gathered using the following categories: 1 time, 2-10 times, 11-50 times, >50 times. All behaviors committed by a specific perpetrator are linked.

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates will be calculated by sex, age-group, and race/ethnicity

    • IVP-39.2 (Developmental) Reduce sexual violence by current or former intimate partners

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons reporting sexual violence victimization by a current or former intimate partner in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 12 months, how many partners have done any of the following things when you didn't want it to happen?

        • exposed their sexual body parts to you, flashed you, or masturbated in front of you?
        • made you show your sexual body parts to them? Remember, we are only asking about things that you didn't want to happen.
        • made you look at or participate in sexual photos or movies?
        • harassed you while you were in a public place in a way that made you feel unsafe?
        • kissed you in a sexual way? Remember, we are only asking about things you didn't want to happen.
        • fondled or grabbed your sexual body parts?

        When you were drunk, high, drugged, or passed out and unable to consent, how many partners during the past 12 months have had:

        • vaginal sex with you? By vaginal sex, we mean that {if female: a man or boy put his penis in your vagina} {if male): a woman or girl made you put your penis in her vagina}.
        • {if male} made you perform anal sex, meaning they made you put your penis into their anus?
        • made you receive anal sex, meaning they put their penis into your anus?
        • made you perform oral sex, meaning that they put their penis in your mouth or made you penetrate their {vagina or} anus with your mouth?
        • made you receive oral sex, meaning that they put their mouth on your {if male, fill: penis; if female, fill: vagina} or anus?

        Some people are threatened with harm or physically forced to have sex when they don't want to, for example, by being pinned or held down, or by the use of violence. During the past 12 months, how many partners have ever used physical force or threats to physically harm you to make you:

        • have vaginal sex?
        • {if male} perform anal sex?
        • receive anal sex?

        During the past 12 months, how many partners have used physical force or threats of physical harm to:

        • make you perform oral sex?
        • make you receive oral sex?
        • put their fingers or an object in your {if female, fill: vagina or} anus?
        • {if male} TRY to make you have vaginal sex with them, but sex did not happen?
        • TRY to have {if female, fill: vaginal,} oral, or anal sex with you, but sex did not happen?

        Sometimes unwanted sexual contact happens after a person is pressured in a nonphysical way. During the past 12 months, how many partners have you had vaginal, oral, or anal sex with after they pressured you by:

        • doing things like telling you lies, making promises about the future they knew were untrue, threatening to end your relationship, or threatening to spread rumors about you?
        • wearing you down by repeatedly asking for sex, or showing they were unhappy?

        For each of the above behaviors that are endorsed, frequency information is gathered using the following categories: 1 time, 2 -10 times, 11-50 times, >50 times. All behaviors committed by a specific perpetrator are linked.

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates will be calculated by sex, age-group, and race/ethnicity

    • IVP-39.3 (Developmental) Reduce psychological abuse by current or former intimate partners

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons reporting psychological abuse by a current or former intimate partner in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 12 months, how many partners have:

        • acted very angry towards you in a way that seemed dangerous?
        • told you that you were a loser, a failure, or not good enough?
        • called you names like ugly, fat, crazy, or stupid?
        • insulted, humiliated, or made fun of you in front of others?
        • told you that no one else would want you?
        • tried to keep you from seeing or talking to your family or friends?
        • made decisions for you that should have been yours to make, such as the clothes you wear, things you eat, or the friends you have?
        • kept track of you by demanding to know where you were and what you were doing?
        • threatened to hurt him or herself or commit suicide when he or she was upset with you?
        • threatened to hurt a pet or threatened to take a pet away from you?
        • threatened to hurt someone you love?
        • hurt someone you love?
        • threatened to keep you from seeing your children or grandchildren?
        • kept you from leaving the house when you wanted to go?
        • kept you from having money for your own use?
        • destroyed something that belonged to you?

        For each of the above behaviors that are endorsed, frequency information is gathered using the following categories: 1 time, 2-10 times, 11-50 times, >50 times. All behaviors committed by a specific perpetrator are linked.

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates will be calculated by sex, age-group, and race/ethnicity

    • IVP-39.4 (Developmental) Reduce stalking by current or former intimate partners

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons reporting stalking victimization by a current or former intimate partner in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 12 months, how many partners have:

        • made unwanted phone calls to you or left you messages? This includes hang-ups, text or voice messages.
        • sent you unwanted emails, instant messages, or sent messages through websites like MySpace or Facebook?
        • left you cards, letters, flowers, or presents when they knew you didn't want them to?
        • watched or followed you from a distance, or spied on you with a listening device, camera, or GPS [IF NECESSARY: global positioning system]?
        • approached you or showed up in places, such as your home, workplace, or school when you didn't want them to be there?
        • left strange or potentially threatening items for you to find?
        • sneaked into your home or car and did things to scare you by letting you know they had been there?

        For each of the above behaviors that are endorsed, frequency information is gathered using the following categories: 1 time, 2-10 times, 11-50 times, >50 times. Overall duration of stalking and level of fear are also obtained. Those who experienced any of the experience above and report any level of fear as a result will be considered victims of stalking. All behaviors committed by a specific perpetrator are linked.

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates will be calculated by sex, age-group, and race/ethnicity

  • IVP-40 (Developmental) Reduce sexual violence

    • IVP-40.1 (Developmental) Reduce rape or attempted rape

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons reporting rape or attempted rape in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System

        [NUMERATOR:]

        When you were drunk, high, drugged, or passed out and unable to consent, how many people during the past 12 months have had:

        • vaginal sex with you? By vaginal sex, we mean that {if female: a man or boy put his penis in your vagina} {if male): a woman or girl made you put your penis in her vagina}.
        • {if male} made you perform anal sex, meaning they made you put your penis into their anus?
        • made you receive anal sex, meaning they put their penis into your anus?
        • made you perform oral sex, meaning that they put their penis in your mouth or made you penetrate their {vagina or} anus with your mouth?
        • made you receive oral sex, meaning that they put their mouth on your {if male, fill: penis; if female, fill: vagina} or anus?

        Some people are threatened with harm or physically forced to have sex when they don't want to, for example, by being pinned or held down, or by the use of violence. During the past 12 months, how many people have ever used physical force or threats to physically harm you to make you:

        • have vaginal sex?
        • {if male} perform anal sex?
        • receive anal sex?

        During the past 12 months, how many people have used physical force or threats of physical harm to:

        • make you perform oral sex?
        • make you receive oral sex?
        • put their fingers or an object in your {if female, fill: vagina or} anus?
        • {if male} TRY to make you have vaginal sex with them, but sex did not happen?
        • TRY to have {if female, fill: vaginal,} oral, or anal sex with you, but sex did not happen?

        For each of the above behaviors that are endorsed, frequency information is gathered using the following categories: 1 time, 2 -10 times, 11-50 times, >50 times. All behaviors committed by a specific perpetrator are linked.

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates will be calculated by sex, age-group, and race/ethnicity

    • IVP-40.2 (Developmental) Reduce abusive sexual contact other than rape or attempted rape

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons reporting abusive sexual contact (excluding rape or attempted rape) in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 12 months, how many people have done any of the following things when you didn't want it to happen:

        • kissed you in a sexual way? Remember, we are only asking about things you didn't want to happen.
        • fondled or grabbed your sexual body parts?

        Sometimes unwanted sexual contact happens after a person is pressured in a nonphysical way. During the past 12 months, how many people have you had vaginal, oral, or anal sex with after they pressured you by:

        • doing things like telling you lies, making promises about the future they knew were untrue, threatening to end your relationship, or threatening to spread rumors about you?
        • wearing you down by repeatedly asking for sex, or showing they were unhappy?
        • using their influence or authority over you, for example, your boss or your teacher?

        For each of the above behaviors that are endorsed, frequency information is gathered using the following categories: 1 time, 2 -10 times, 11-50 times, >50 times. All behaviors committed by a specific perpetrator are linked.

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates will be calculated by sex, age-group, and race/ethnicity

    • IVP-40.3 (Developmental) Reduce non-contact sexual abuse

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      *** Missing ***
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons reporting non-contact sexual abuse in the past 12 months

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        During the past 12 months, how many people have done any of the following things when you didn't want it to happen?

        exposed their sexual body parts to you, flashed you, or masturbated in front of you?

        made you show your sexual body parts to them? Remember, we are only asking about things that you didn't want to happen.

        made you look at or participate in sexual photos or movies?

        harassed you while you were in a public place in a way that made you feel unsafe?

        For each of the above behaviors that are endorsed, frequency information is gathered using the following categories: 1 time, 2 -10 times, 11-50 times, >50 times. All behaviors committed by a specific perpetrator are linked.

      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Rates will be calculated by sex, age-group, and race/ethnicity

  • IVP-41 Reduce nonfatal intentional self-harm injuries

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Bridged-race Population Estimates
    National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    124.9 (2008)
    Target: 
    112.4
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of initial hospital emergency department visits for nonfatal intentional self-harm injuries

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      A nonfatal intentional self-harm injury is defined as an injury or poisoning resulting from a deliberate violent act inflicted on oneself with the intent to take one's own life or with the intent to harm oneself. Both confirmed and suspected intentional self-harm is included.

      NEISS does not use ICD codes. However, reporters are given extensive training and report any poisoning cases in the emergency department record. A detailed description of the methods for coding poisoning injuries has been published elsewhere.

      Data by race are not reported because multiple race data are not typically available from the emergency department records.

      Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the new bridged-race postcensal population estimates of the resident population of the United States for the data year involved. For census years (e.g. 2010), population counts enumerated as of April 1 are used. For all other years, populations estimates as of July 1 are used. Intercensal population estimates are used in rate calculations for the years between censuses (e.g. 1991-1999, 2001-2009). Please note that postcensal population estimates for years after the last census year are updated annually, which means that rates prior to the update may be different.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+
      • Sex: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2013, rates for 2008 and 2009 were revised using intercensal population estimates based on the 2000 and 2010 censuses instead of the postcensal estimates for the denominator. The original baseline was revised from 125.3 to 124.9. The target was adjusted from 112.8 to 112.4 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2015, the denominator data source name was revised from Population Estimates to Bridged-Race Population Estimates for Census 2000 and 2010. The numerator data source, baseline estimate, target, and target-setting method remain unchanged.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Annest JL et. Al. A Training Module for Coding Mechanism and Intent of Injury for the NEISS All Injury Program. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC, Atlanta, GA. September 25, 2009.
    2. CPSC. Coding Manual for All Trauma NEISS. US Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD. January, 2007.
  • IVP-42 Reduce children’s exposure to violence

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    58.9 (2008)
    Target: 
    53.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Children aged 17 years and under who have been exposed in the past year to any form of violence measured

    Denominator: 

    Children aged 17 years and under

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      The survey asked screening questions about 44 types of victimization in the following categories:

      Conventional crime.

      Nine types of victimization, including robbery, theft, destruction of property, attack with an object or weapon, attack without an object or weapon, attempted attack, threatened attack, kidnapping or attempted kidnapping, and hate crime or bias attack (an attack on a child because of the child's or parent's skin color, religion, physical problem, or perceived sexual orientation).

      Child maltreatment.

      Four types of victimization, including being hit, kicked, or beaten by an adult (other than spanking on the bottom); psychological or emotional abuse; neglect; and abduction by a parent or caregiver, also known as custodial interference.

      Peer and sibling victimization.

      Six types of victimization, including being attacked by a group of children; being hit or beaten by another child, including a brother or sister; being hit or kicked in the private parts; being chased, grabbed, or forced to do something; being teased or emotionally bullied; and being a victim of dating violence.

      Sexual victimization.

      Seven types of victimization, including sexual contact or fondling by an adult the child knew, sexual contact or fondling by an adult stranger, sexual contact or fondling by another child or teenager, attempted or completed intercourse, exposure or "flashing," sexual harassment, and consensual sexual conduct with an adult.

      Witnessing and indirect victimization.

      These fall into two general categories, exposure to community violence and exposure to family violence. For exposure to community violence, the survey included six types of victimization, including seeing someone attacked with an object or weapon; seeing someone attacked without an object or weapon; having something stolen from the household; having a friend, neighbor, or family member murdered; witnessing a murder; witnessing or hearing a shooting, bombing, or riot; being in a war zone; knowing a family member or close friend who was fondled or forced to have sex; knowing a family member or close friend who was robbed or mugged; and knowing a family member or close friend who was threatened with a gun or knife.

      For exposure to family violence, eight types of victimization were assessed: seeing a parent assaulted by a spouse, domestic partner, or boyfriend or girlfriend; seeing a brother or sister assaulted by a parent; threat by one parent to assault the other; threat by a parent to damage the other parent's property; one parent pushing the other; one parent hitting or slapping the other; one parent kicking, choking, or beating up the other; and assault by another adult household member against a child or adult in the household.

      School violence and threat.

      Two types of victimization, including a credible bomb threat against the child's school and fire or other property damage to the school.

      Internet violence and victimization.

      Two types of victimization, including internet threats or harassment and unwanted online sexual solicitation.

    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Survey respondents include children aged 10-17 years or parent proxies for those aged 9 years and younger.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 60.6 to 58.8 due to a change in the methodology. The algorithm to define exposure to violence was revised because four survey questions related to witness and indirect victimization, which contributed only a small percentage of total victimization in 2008 (about 0.5%), were dropped from the NatSCEV survey in 2011. The discontinued items include witnessing a murder, knowing a family member or close friend who was fondled or forced to have sex, knowing a family member or close friend who was robbed or mugged, and knowing a family member or close friend who was threatened with a gun or knife. Thus, the 2008 data were reanalyzed to remove these four items so that the data are comparable with those in subsequent years. The target was adjusted from 54.5 to 52.9 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2015, the baseline was revised from 58.8 to 58.9 due to a change in the methodology. For some 2008 and 2011 survey items related to witnessing violence, there was a follow-up question asking the child whether he/she had directly seen or heard the incident or had only been told about it or seen a bruise or injury on the victim. This was to confirm that the child had been directly exposed to the violence. In prior 2008 and 2011 estimates, only victimizations where the child had directly seen or heard the incident were included. In 2014, this follow-up question was dropped in order to shorten the survey since there had been only a very small difference when screening out incidents to which the child had been indirectly exposed. Thus, the 2008 and 2011 data were reanalyzed to remove the follow-up question so that the data are comparable with those in subsequent years. The target was adjusted from 52.9 to 53.0 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective

    1. Children’s Exposure to Violence: A Comprehensive National Survey

  • IVP-43 Increase the number of States and the District of Columbia that link data on violent deaths from death certificates, law enforcement, and coroner and medical examiner reports to inform prevention efforts at the State and local levels

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Violent Death Reporting System
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    number
    Baseline (Year): 
    16 (2009)
    Target: 
    51
    Target-Setting Method: 
    Total coverage
    Target-Setting Method Justification: 
    Comprehensive national-level data on violent deaths are critical to the design, implementation, and monitoring of effective prevention strategies. Accordingly, the target of total coverage has been set for National Violent Death Reporting System coverage across the 50 States and the District of Columbia.
    Numerator: 

    Number of states that link data on violent deaths from death certificates, law enforcement, and coroner and medical examiner reports

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      The NVDRS system is supported by CDC’s Division of Violence Prevention (DVP). DVP staff can provide the number of states that are collecting statewide data for NVDRS.