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  • AHS-1 Increase the proportion of persons with health insurance

    • AHS-1.1 Increase the proportion of persons with medical insurance
      LHI

      Leading Health Indicators are a subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives selected to communicate high-priority health issues.

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      83.2 (2008)
      Target: 
      100
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Total coverage
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Total coverage of the population is an important national goal addressed by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), a comprehensive health care reform law passed in 2010. ACA provides new strategies to reduce the number of uninsured children and adults and to improve the organization and delivery of health care. Increased health insurance coverage, both private and public, will facilitate entry into the health care system. Health insurance can protect individuals and families from forgoing needed medical services and from the burden of large medical bills. Reforms under the law also are expected to lower health care costs and enhance the quality of care.
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons under age 65 years who report coverage by any type of public or private health insurance

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons under age 65 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        What kind of health insurance or health care coverage [do you/does ALIAS] have? INCLUDE those that pay for only one type of service (nursing home care, accidents, or dental care). EXCLUDE private plans that only provide cash while hospitalized.

        1. Private health insurance
        2. Medicare
        3. Medigap
        4. Medicaid
        5. SCHIP (CHIP/Children’s Health Insurance Program)
        6. Military health care (TRICARE/VA/CHAMP-VA)
        7. Indian Health Service
        8. State-sponsored health plan
        9. Other government program
        10. Single Service plan (e.g., dental, vision, prescription)
        11. No coverage of any type
        12. Refused
        13. Don’t know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Leading Health Indicator:
      Methodology Notes: 

        Health Care coverage is defined as having any type of health insurance or Health Care plan, including those obtained by employment, direct purchase, and government programs such as Medicare, Medi-Gap, Medicaid, military healthcare/VA, CHAMPUS/TRICARE/CHAMP-VA, Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and other state-sponsored or government-sponsored health plans. Private plans that only provide cash while hospitalized or only pay for one type of service (e.g., nursing home care, accidents, dental care) are excluded. Persons with Indian Health Service coverage only are considered to have no coverage.

      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2010: With Special Feature on Death and Dying. Hyattsville, MD. 2010.
    • AHS-1.2 Increase the proportion of persons with dental insurance

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      50.3 (2008)
      Target: 
      55.3
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons under age 65 years who report coverage by any type of public or private dental insurance

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons under age 65 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Updated: Annually

        Dental coverage is defined as having a single service plan that covers dental care and/or a health insurance plan that covers dental care. Due to difficulties measuring dental insurance coverage among those without private medical insurance, particularly those covered by public medical insurance, the data only include persons with private medical insurance.

        More information on the definition of health insurance coverage is provided in the “technical notes” section of Health, United States, 2010.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-1.2 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-1, which tracked persons covered by medical insurance. Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to measurable May 20, 2015.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2010: With Special Feature on Death and Dying. Hyattsville, MD. 2010.
    • AHS-1.3 Increase the proportion of persons with prescription drug insurance

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      62.2 (2008)
      Target: 
      68.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons under age 65 years who report coverage by any type of public or private prescription drug insurance

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons under age 65 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        Updated: Annually

        Prescription drug coverage is defined as having one or more of the following: private health insurance, a single service plan that covers prescriptions, or Medicare Part D.

        More information on the definition of health insurance coverage is provided in the “technical notes” section of Health, United States, 2010.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-1.3 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-1, which tracked persons covered by medical insurance. Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to measurable May 20, 2015.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2010: With Special Feature on Death and Dying. Hyattsville, MD. 2010.
  • AHS-2 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of insured persons with coverage for clinical preventive services

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    *** Missing ***

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    AHS-2 was archived in September 2017.
  • AHS-3 Increase the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider
    LHI

    Leading Health Indicators are a subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives selected to communicate high-priority health issues.

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    76.3 (2007)
    Target: 
    83.9
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons who report that they have a usual primary care provider

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Retained from HP2010 objective
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Is there a particular doctor's office, health center, or other place that [PERSON] usually goes if [PERSON] is sick or needs advice about [PERSON's] health?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. More than one place
      4. Refused
      5. Don't know

      Is [PROVIDER] the {person/place} they would go for new health problems?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Is [PROVIDER] the {person/place} they would go for preventive health care, such as general check-ups, examinations, and immunizations?

      1. Yes
      2. No

      Is [PROVIDER] the {person/place} they would go for referrals to other health professionals when needed?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Leading Health Indicator:
    Methodology Notes: 

      Persons were considered to have a usual primary care provider if they responded “yes” to all four of the Numerator questions.

  • AHS-4 (Developmental) Increase the number of practicing primary care providers.

    • AHS-4.1 (Developmental) Increase the number of practicing medical doctors

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      *** Missing ***

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective is no longer tracked due to the lack of a reliable data source.
    • AHS-4.2 (Developmental) Increase the number of practicing doctors of osteopathy

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      *** Missing ***

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective is no longer tracked due to the lack of a reliable data source.
    • AHS-4.3 (Developmental) Increase the number of practicing physician assistants

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      *** Missing ***

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective is no longer tracked due to the lack of a reliable data source.
    • AHS-4.4 (Developmental) Increase the number of practicing nurse practitioners

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      per 100,000
      Numerator: 

      *** Missing ***

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Methodology Notes: 

        Projections indicate that there may be a continuing shortage of nurses in the near future.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective is no longer tracked due to the lack of a reliable data source.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. Kuehn BM. No end in sight to nursing shortage: Bottleneck at nursing schools a key factor. JAMA 2007;298(14):1623-5.
  • AHS-5 Increase the proportion of persons who have a specific source of ongoing care

    • AHS-5.1 Increase the proportion of persons of all ages who have a specific source of ongoing care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      86.4 (2008)
      Target: 
      95.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons who report having a specific source of primary care

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        [Persons aged 18 years and over:]

        Is there a place that you USUALLY go to when you are sick or need advice about your health?

        1. Yes
        2. There is NO place
        3. There is MORE THAN ONE place
        4. Refused
        5. Don’t know

        What kind of place is it – a clinic, doctor’s office, emergency room, or some other place?

        1. Clinic or health center
        2. Doctor's office or HMO
        3. Hospital emergency room
        4. Hospital outpatient department
        5. Some other place
        6. Doesn't go to one place most often
        7. Refused
        8. Don’t know

        [Children and adolescents under age 18 years:]

        Is there a place that [alias] USUALLY goes to when [he/she] is sick or you need advice about [his/her] health?

        1. Yes
        2. There is NO place
        3. There is MORE THAN ONE place
        4. Refused
        5. Don’t know

        What kind of place does [alias] go to most often – a clinic, doctor’s office, emergency room, or some other place?

        1. Clinic or health center
        2. Doctor's office or HMO
        3. Hospital emergency room
        4. Hospital outpatient department
        5. Some other place
        6. Doesn't go to one place most often
        7. Refused
        8. Don’t know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A specific source of primary care includes responses (1), (2), (4), (5), and (6) to the second question listed in the numerator section.

      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.
    • AHS-5.2 Increase the proportion of children and youth aged 17 years and under who have a specific source of ongoing care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      94.3 (2008)
      Target: 
      100
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Total coverage
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons aged 17 years and under who report having a specific source of primary care

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 17 years and under

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Is there a place that [alias] USUALLY goes to when [he/she] is sick or you need advice about [his/her] health?

        1. Yes
        2. There is NO place
        3. There is MORE THAN ONE place
        4. Refused
        5. Not ascertained
        6. Don’t know

        What kind of place does [alias] go to most often – a clinic, doctor’s office, emergency room, or some other place?

        1. Clinic or health center
        2. Doctor's office or HMO
        3. Hospital emergency room
        4. Hospital outpatient department
        5. Some other place
        6. Doesn't go to one place most often
        7. Refused
        8. Not ascertained
        9. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A specific source of primary care includes responses (1), (2), (4), (5), and (6) to the second question listed in the numerator section.

      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.
    • AHS-5.3 Increase the proportion of adults aged 18 to 64 years who have a specific source of ongoing care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      81.3 (2008)
      Target: 
      89.4
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons aged 18 to 64 years who report having a specific source of primary care

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 18 to 64 years

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Is there a place that you USUALLY go to when you are sick or need advice about your health?

        1. Yes
        2. There is NO place
        3. There is MORE THAN ONE place
        4. Refused
        5. Don’t know

        What kind of place is it – a clinic, doctor’s office, emergency room, or some other place?

        1. Clinic or health center
        2. Doctor's office or HMO
        3. Hospital emergency room
        4. Hospital outpatient department
        5. Some other place
        6. Doesn't go to one place most often
        7. Refused
        8. Don’t know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A specific source of primary care includes responses (1), (2), (4), (5), and (6) to the second question listed in the numerator section.

      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 01-04c which tracked the proportion of persons aged 18 years and over with a source of ongoing care. This objective tracks the proportion of persons aged 18 to 64 years with a source of ongoing care.
    • AHS-5.4 Increase the proportion of adults aged 65 years and older who have a specific source of ongoing care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Health Interview Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      96.3 (2008)
      Target: 
      100
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Total coverage
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons aged 65 years and over who report having a specific source of primary care

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons aged 65 years and over

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Is there a place that you USUALLY go to when you are sick or need advice about your health?

        1. Yes
        2. There is NO place
        3. There is MORE THAN ONE place
        4. Refused
        5. Don’t know

        What kind of place is it – a clinic, doctor’s office, emergency room, or some other place?

        1. Clinic or health center
        2. Doctor's office or HMO
        3. Hospital emergency room
        4. Hospital outpatient department
        5. Some other place
        6. Doesn't go to one place most often
        7. Refused
        8. Don’t know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A specific source of primary care includes responses (1), (2), (4), (5), and (6) to the second question listed in the numerator section.

      Trend Issues: 
      Beginning with 2018, the American Community Survey questions are no longer available in the NHIS. As a result, tabulated data by disability are discontinued after 2017.
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 01-04c, which tracked the proportion of persons aged 18 years and over with a source of ongoing care. This objective tracks a the proportion of persons aged 65 years and over with a source of ongoing care.
  • AHS-6 Reduce the proportion of persons who are unable to obtain or delay in obtaining necessary medical care, dental care, or prescription medicines

    • AHS-6.1 Reduce the proportion of persons who are unable to obtain or delay in obtaining necessary medical care, dental care, or prescription medicines

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      10.0 (2007)
      Target: 
      9.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons who report not being able to or having delay in obtaining needed medical care, dental care, or prescription medicines

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Adapted from HP2010 objective
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family unable to get medical care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family delayed in getting medical care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family unable to get dental care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family delayed in getting dental care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family unable to get prescription medicines they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family delayed in getting prescription medicines they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020: 
      This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 01-06 which tracked the percentage of families who experienced delays or difficulty in obtaining non-specified health care due to various financial, physical, and other barriers while this objective tracks the percentage of persons who experience delays or difficulty in obtaining medical, dental, or prescription health services.
    • AHS-6.2 Reduce the proportion of persons who are unable to obtain or delay in obtaining necessary medical care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      4.7 (2007)
      Target: 
      4.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons who report not being able to obtain or having delay in obtaining needed medical care

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family unable to get medical care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family delayed in getting medical care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
    • AHS-6.3 Reduce the proportion of persons who are unable to obtain or delay in obtaining necessary dental care

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      5.5 (2007)
      Target: 
      5.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons who report not being able to obtain or having delay in obtaining needed dental care

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family unable to get dental care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family delayed in getting dental care, tests, or treatments they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
    • AHS-6.4 Reduce the proportion of persons who are unable to obtain or delay in obtaining necessary prescription medicines

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      3.1 (2007)
      Target: 
      2.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of persons who report not being able to obtain or having delay in obtaining needed prescription medicines

      Denominator: 

      Number of persons

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family unable to get prescription medicines they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know

        In the last 12 months, was anyone in the family delayed in getting prescription medicines they or a doctor believed necessary?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Refused
        4. Don't know
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
  • AHS-7 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons who receive appropriate evidence-based clinical preventive services

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    *** Missing ***

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
  • AHS-8 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons who have access to rapidly responding prehospital emergency medical services

    • AHS-8.1 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons who are covered by basic life support

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Numerator: 

      *** Missing ***

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective is not longer tracked due to the lack of a reliable data source.
    • AHS-8.2 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of persons who are covered by advanced life support

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Numerator: 

      *** Missing ***

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Retained from HP2010 objective

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      This objective is not longer tracked due to the lack of a reliable data source.
  • AHS-9 Reduce the proportion of hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see an emergency department clinician exceeds the recommended timeframe

    • AHS-9.1 Reduce the proportion of all hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see an emergency department clinician exceeds the recommended timeframe

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      24.7 (2010)
      Target: 
      22.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time

      Denominator: 

      Number of hospital emergency visits

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, Emergency Department Patient Record Form:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Date and time of visit - Arrival

        Date and time of visit - Seen by MD/DO/PA/NP

        Triage level

        1. Level 1 - Immediate
        2. Level 2 - Emergent
        3. Level 3 - Urgent
        4. Level 4 - Semiurgent
        5. Level 5 - Nonurgent
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A hospital emergency room visit in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time is determined by comparing the elapsed time to see an emergency department clinician (medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, physician assistant or nurse practitioner) to the recommended time frame at the time of triage. Triage level 1 – immediate is defined as less than one minute, level 2 – emergent is defined as 1 – 14 minutes, level 3 – urgent is defined as 15 – 60 minutes, level 4 – semiurgent is defined as 61 – 120 minutes, and level 5 – nonurgent is defined as more than 2 hours – 24 hours.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-9 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-10, which tracked delay or difficulty in getting emergency medical care. Objective AHS-9 captures actual wait times and is a better measure of access than the Healthy People 2010 version, which was based on patient perception and is a better measure of quality.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to measurable July 20, 2016
    • AHS-9.2 Reduce the proportion of Level 1–immediate hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see an emergency department clinician exceeds the recommended timeframe

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      83.5 (2010)
      Target: 
      75.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of triage level 1 hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time

      Denominator: 

      Number of triage level 1 hospital emergency visits

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, Emergency Department Patient Record Form:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Date and time of visit - Arrival

        Date and time of visit - Seen by MD/DO/PA/NP

        Triage level

        1. Level 1 - Immediate
        2. Level 2 - Emergent
        3. Level 3 - Urgent
        4. Level 4 - Semiurgent
        5. Level 5 - Nonurgent
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A hospital emergency room visit in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time is determined by comparing the elapsed time to see an emergency department clinician (medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, physician assistant or nurse practitioner) to the recommended time frame at the time of triage. Triage level 1 – Immediate is defined as less than one minute.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-9 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-10, which tracked delay or difficulty in getting emergency medical care. Objective AHS-9 captures actual wait times and is a better measure of access than the Healthy People 2010 version, which was based on patient perception and is a better measure of quality.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to measurable July 20, 2016
    • AHS-9.3 Reduce the proportion of Level 2–emergent hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see an emergency department clinician exceeds the recommended timeframe

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      66.8 (2010)
      Target: 
      60.1
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of triage level 2 hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time

      Denominator: 

      Number of triage level 2 hospital emergency visits

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, Emergency Department Patient Record Form:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Date and time of visit - Arrival

        Date and time of visit - Seen by MD/DO/PA/NP

        Triage level

        1. Level 1 - Immediate
        2. Level 2 - Emergent
        3. Level 3 - Urgent
        4. Level 4 - Semiurgent
        5. Level 5 - Nonurgent
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A hospital emergency room visit in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time is determined by comparing the elapsed time to see an emergency department clinician (medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, physician assistant or nurse practitioner) to the recommended time frame at the time of triage. Triage level 2 – Emergent is defined as 1 – 14 minutes.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-9 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-10, which tracked delay or difficulty in getting emergency medical care. Objective AHS-9 captures actual wait times and is a better measure of access than the Healthy People 2010 version, which was based on patient perception and is a better measure of quality.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to measurable July 20, 2016
    • AHS-9.4 Reduce the proportion of Level 3–urgent hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see an emergency department clinician exceeds the recommended timeframe

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      27.6 (2010)
      Target: 
      24.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of triage level 3 hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time

      Denominator: 

      Number of triage level 3 hospital emergency visits

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, Emergency Department Patient Record Form:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Date and time of visit - Arrival

        Date and time of visit - Seen by MD/DO/PA/NP

        Triage level

        1. Level 1 - Immediate
        2. Level 2 - Emergent
        3. Level 3 - Urgent
        4. Level 4 - Semiurgent
        5. Level 5 - Nonurgent
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A hospital emergency room visit in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time is determined by comparing the elapsed time to see an emergency department clinician (medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, physician assistant or nurse practitioner) to the recommended time frame at the time of triage. Triage level 3 – Urgent is defined as 15 – 60 minutes.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-9 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-10, which tracked delay or difficulty in getting emergency medical care. Objective AHS-9 captures actual wait times and is a better measure of access than the Healthy People 2010 version, which was based on patient perception and is a better measure of quality.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to measurable July 20, 2016
    • AHS-9.5 Reduce the proportion of Level 4–semi-urgent hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see an emergency department clinician exceeds the recommended timeframe

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      10.1 (2010)
      Target: 
      7.2
      Target-Setting Method: 
      Minimal statistical significance
      Target-Setting Method Justification: 
      Emergency medical services are a vital part of access to health care in the U.S. Rapid treatment of heart attacks, sepsis, stroke, pneumonia, and trauma (among other conditions) are known to improve outcomes, and longer wait times could diminish the quality of care in emergency departments (EDs). The proposed target-setting method for AHS-9.1 through AHS-9.4 is 10% improvement, and for AHS-9.5 it is minimal statistical significance.
      Numerator: 

      Number of triage level 4 hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time

      Denominator: 

      Number of triage level 4 hospital emergency visits

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, Emergency Department Patient Record Form:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Date and time of visit - Arrival

        Date and time of visit - Seen by MD/DO/PA/NP

        Triage level

        1. Level 1 - Immediate
        2. Level 2 - Emergent
        3. Level 3 - Urgent
        4. Level 4 - Semiurgent
        5. Level 5 - Nonurgent
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Annual
      Methodology Notes: 

        A hospital emergency room visit in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time is determined by comparing the elapsed time to see an emergency department clinician (medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, physician assistant or nurse practitioner) to the recommended time frame at the time of triage. Triage level 4 – Semiurgent is defined as 61 – 120 minutes.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-9 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-10, which tracked delay or difficulty in getting emergency medical care. Objective AHS-9 captures actual wait times and is a better measure of access than the Healthy People 2010 version, which was based on patient perception and is a better measure of quality.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to measurable July 20, 2016. Target was changed from 8.1% to 7.2% in February 2017 to correct original baseline calculation.
    • AHS-9.6 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of Level 5–non-urgent hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see an emergency department clinician exceeds the recommended timeframe

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Numerator: 

      Number of triage level 5 hospital emergency department visits in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time

      Denominator: 

      Number of triage level 5 hospital emergency visits

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, Emergency Department Patient Record Form:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Date and time of visit - Arrival

        Date and time of visit - Seen by MD/DO/PA/NP

        Triage level

        1. Level 1 - Immediate
        2. Level 2 - Emergent
        3. Level 3 - Urgent
        4. Level 4 - Semiurgent
        5. Level 5 - Nonurgent
      Methodology Notes: 

        A hospital emergency room visit in which the wait time to see a physician exceeds the recommended wait time is determined by comparing the elapsed time to see an emergency department clinician (medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, physician assistant or nurse practitioner) to the recommended time frame at the time of triage. Triage level 5 – Nonurgent is defined as more than 2 hours – 24 hours.

      Trend Issues: 
      Objective AHS-9 is similar to Healthy People 2010 objective 1-10, which tracked delay or difficulty in getting emergency medical care. Objective AHS-9 captures actual wait times and is a better measure of access than the Healthy People 2010 version, which was based on patient perception and is a better measure of quality.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Objective was moved from developmental to archived July 20, 2016.