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Older Adults Data Details

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  • OA-1 Increase the proportion of older adults who use the Welcome to Medicare benefit

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Medicare Administrative Data; Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    6.4 (2008)
    Target: 
    7.0
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of Medicare Part B beneficiaries who enrolled in Medicare during the calendar year of interest and had a Welcome to Medicare visit during the 12 months following enrollment

    Denominator: 

    Number of beneficiaries who enrolled in Medicare Part B during the calendar year of interest

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Medicare covers a one-time initial examination (also known as the Welcome to Medicare preventive visit) within the first 12 months of enrollment in Part B. All people new to Medicare qualify for this visit. The is a no-cost benefit to new enrollees that provides a basic medical screening that focuses on assessing individual need for preventive care, such as screenings for high blood pressure, obesity, vision, and depression. Almost all U.S. citizens aged 65 years and over are enrolled in Medicare.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 7.3 to 6.4 due to a change in programming. The target was adjusted from 8.0 to 7.0 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • OA-2 Increase the proportion of older adults who are up to date on a core set of clinical preventive services

    • OA-2.1 Increase the proportion of males aged 65 years and older who are up to date on a core set of clinical preventive services

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Surveillance and Informatics Program Office (CDC/PHSIPO)
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      40.5 (2012)
      Target: 
      44.6
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of men aged 65 years and over who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past year, a pneumococcal vaccination ever,  and either a colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy in the past 10 years or a fecal occult blood test in the past year

      Denominator: 

      Number of men aged 65 years and over

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Now I will ask you questions about the seasonal flu vaccine. There are two ways to get the seasonal flu vaccine, one is a shot in the arm and the other is a spray, mist, or drop in the nose called FluMist.™ A new flu shot came out in 2011 that injects vaccine with a very small needle. It is called Fluzone Intradermal vaccine. This is also considered a flu shot.

        During the past 12 months, have you had either a seasonal flu shot or a seasonal flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        During what month and year did you receive your most recent flu shot injected into your arm or flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

        1. __/____ Month/Year
        2. Don’t know/Not sure
        3. Refused

        A pneumonia shot or pneumococcal vaccine is usually given only once or twice in a person’s lifetime and is different from the flu shot. Have you ever had a pneumonia shot?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        The next questions are about colorectal cancer screening.

        A Blood stool test is a test that may use a special kit at home to determine whether the stool contains blood. Have you ever had this test using a home kit?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        How long has it been since you had your last blood stool test using a home kit?

        1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
        2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
        3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
        4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
        5. More than 5 years ago
        6. Don’t know/Not sure
        7. Refused

        Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are exams in which a tube is inserted into the rectum to view the colon for signs of cancer or other health problems. Have you ever had either of these exams?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        How long has it been since your last sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy?

        1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
        2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
        3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
        4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
        5. Within the past 10 years (5 years but less than 10 years ago)
        6. More than 10 years ago
        7. Don’t know/Not sure
        8. Refused
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Preventing chronic diseases drives improvements in health, quality of life, and value in health spending. National experts agree on a set of recommended clinical preventive services for adults aged 65 or older that can help detect many chronic diseases, delay their onset, or identify them early in more treatable stages, which include influenza vaccination, pneumococcal vaccination, colorectal cancer screening, and mammography screening for women. A promising tool for assessing prevention program effectiveness is the measure of adults being up-to-date with recommended core clinical preventive services. Because it is an all-or-none measure, it cannot increase unless multiple component activities (screenings and vaccinations) are delivered to the same individual. The “up-to-date” measure can help improve program transparency, accountability and decision making by driving the coordination of prevention activities across disease-based “silos” in both the clinical and public health settings.

        This indicator should not be interpreted as covering all recommended clinical preventives services for this age group. It is limited to a select set of clinical preventive services by age and sex for which data are available in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Data on all services in the core set are not available every year given the rotating core questions on BRFSS.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is conducted independently by each state and therefore methodologies may vary. Pooled national estimates may not take into account these differences and so may differ from estimates obtained using data sources that use methodologies designed to produce national estimates.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Surveillance and Informatics Program Office (CDC/PHSIPO)
      Measure: 
      percent
      Numerator: 

      Number of men aged 65 years and over who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past year, a pneumococcal vaccination ever,  and either a colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy in the past 10 years or a fecal occult blood test in the past year

      Denominator: 

      Number of men aged 65 years and over

      Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

          From the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System:

          [NUMERATOR:]

          Now I will ask you questions about the seasonal flu vaccine. There are two ways to get the seasonal flu vaccine, one is a shot in the arm and the other is a spray, mist, or drop in the nose called FluMist.™ A new flu shot came out in 2011 that injects vaccine with a very small needle. It is called Fluzone Intradermal vaccine. This is also considered a flu shot.

          During the past 12 months, have you had either a seasonal flu shot or a seasonal flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          During what month and year did you receive your most recent flu shot injected into your arm or flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

          1. __/____ Month/Year
          2. Don’t know/Not sure
          3. Refused

          A pneumonia shot or pneumococcal vaccine is usually given only once or twice in a person’s lifetime and is different from the flu shot. Have you ever had a pneumonia shot?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          The next questions are about colorectal cancer screening.

          A Blood stool test is a test that may use a special kit at home to determine whether the stool contains blood. Have you ever had this test using a home kit?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          How long has it been since you had your last blood stool test using a home kit?

          1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
          2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
          3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
          4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
          5. More than 5 years ago
          6. Don’t know/Not sure
          7. Refused

          Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are exams in which a tube is inserted into the rectum to view the colon for signs of cancer or other health problems. Have you ever had either of these exams?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          How long has it been since your last sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy?

          1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
          2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
          3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
          4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
          5. Within the past 10 years (5 years but less than 10 years ago)
          6. More than 10 years ago
          7. Don’t know/Not sure
          8. Refused
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

          Preventing chronic diseases drives improvements in health, quality of life, and value in health spending. National experts agree on a set of recommended clinical preventive services for adults aged 65 or older that can help detect many chronic diseases, delay their onset, or identify them early in more treatable stages, which include influenza vaccination, pneumococcal vaccination, colorectal cancer screening, and mammography screening for women. A promising tool for assessing prevention program effectiveness is the measure of adults being up-to-date with recommended core clinical preventive services. Because it is an all-or-none measure, it cannot increase unless multiple component activities (screenings and vaccinations) are delivered to the same individual. The “up-to-date” measure can help improve program transparency, accountability and decision making by driving the coordination of prevention activities across disease-based “silos” in both the clinical and public health settings.

          This indicator should not be interpreted as covering all recommended clinical preventives services for this age group. It is limited to a select set of clinical preventive services by age and sex for which data are available in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Data on all services in the core set are not available every year given the rotating core questions on BRFSS.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is conducted independently by each state and therefore methodologies may vary. Pooled national estimates may not take into account these differences and so may differ from estimates obtained using data sources that use methodologies designed to produce national estimates.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2014, the original baseline was revised from 46.3 (2008) to 41.8 (2012) due to a change in the BRFSS survey methodology impacting the ability to trend data pre/post 2011. The target was adjusted from 50.9 to 46.0 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2014, the baseline was further revised from 41.8 (2012) to 40.5 (2012) due to a change in programming. The target was adjusted from 46.0 to 44.6 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire.
      2. CDC, The State of Aging and Health in America 2007. See reference for new on-line interactive version.
    • OA-2.2 Increase the proportion of females aged 65 years and older who are up to date on a core set of clinical preventive services

      About the Data: National

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Surveillance and Informatics Program Office (CDC/PHSIPO)
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      Yes
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      42.5 (2012)
      Target: 
      46.8
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of women aged 65 years and over who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past year, a pneumococcal vaccination ever,   either a colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy in the past 10 years or a fecal occult blood test in the past year, and a mammogram in the past 2 years

      Denominator: 

      Number of women aged 65 years and over

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

        From the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System:

        [NUMERATOR:]

        Now I will ask you questions about the seasonal flu vaccine. There are two ways to get the seasonal flu vaccine, one is a shot in the arm and the other is a spray, mist, or drop in the nose called FluMist.™ A new flu shot came out in 2011 that injects vaccine with a very small needle. It is called Fluzone Intradermal vaccine. This is also considered a flu shot.

        During the past 12 months, have you had either a seasonal flu shot or a seasonal flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        During what month and year did you receive your most recent flu shot injected into your arm or flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

        1. __/____ Month/Year
        2. Don’t know/Not sure
        3. Refused

        A pneumonia shot or pneumococcal vaccine is usually given only once or twice in a person’s lifetime and is different from the flu shot. Have you ever had a pneumonia shot?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        The next questions are about colorectal cancer screening.

        A Blood stool test is a test that may use a special kit at home to determine whether the stool contains blood. Have you ever had this test using a home kit?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        How long has it been since you had your last blood stool test using a home kit?

        1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
        2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
        3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
        4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
        5. More than 5 years ago
        6. Don’t know/Not sure
        7. Refused

        Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are exams in which a tube is inserted into the rectum to view the colon for signs of cancer or other health problems. Have you ever had either of these exams?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        How long has it been since your last sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy?

        1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
        2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
        3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
        4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
        5. Within the past 10 years (5 years but less than 10 years ago)
        6. More than 10 years ago
        7. Don’t know/Not sure
        8. Refused

        The next questions are about breast cancer screening.

        A mammogram is an x-ray of each breast to look for breast cancer. Have you ever had a mammogram?

        1. Yes
        2. No
        3. Don’t know/Not sure
        4. Refused

        How long has it been since your last mammogram?

        1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
        2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
        3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
        4. Within the past 5 years
        5. Don’t know/Not sure
        6. Refused
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Preventing chronic diseases drives improvements in health, quality of life, and value in health spending. National experts agree on a set of recommended clinical preventive services for adults aged 65 or older that can help detect many chronic diseases, delay their onset, or identify them early in more treatable stages, which include influenza vaccination, pneumococcal vaccination, colorectal cancer screening, and mammography screening for women. A promising tool for assessing prevention program effectiveness is the measure of adults being up-to-date with recommended core clinical preventive services. Because it is an all-or-none measure, it cannot increase unless multiple component activities (screenings and vaccinations) are delivered to the same individual. The “up-to-date” measure can help improve program transparency, accountability and decision making by driving the coordination of prevention activities across disease-based “silos” in both the clinical and public health settings.

        This indicator should not be interpreted as covering all recommended clinical preventives services for this age group. It is limited to a select set of clinical preventive services by age and sex for which data are available in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Data on all services in the core set are not available every year given the rotating core questions on BRFSS.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is conducted independently by each state and therefore methodologies may vary. Pooled national estimates may not take into account these differences and so may differ from estimates obtained using data sources that use methodologies designed to produce national estimates.

      About the Data: State

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the state-level data.

      Data Source: 
      Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Surveillance and Informatics Program Office (CDC/PHSIPO)
      Measure: 
      percent
      Numerator: 

      Number of women aged 65 years and over who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past year, a pneumococcal vaccination ever,   either a colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy in the past 10 years or a fecal occult blood test in the past year, and a mammogram in the past 2 years

      Denominator: 

      Number of women aged 65 years and over

      Questions Used to Obtain the State Data: 

          From the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System:

          [NUMERATOR:]

          Now I will ask you questions about the seasonal flu vaccine. There are two ways to get the seasonal flu vaccine, one is a shot in the arm and the other is a spray, mist, or drop in the nose called FluMist.™ A new flu shot came out in 2011 that injects vaccine with a very small needle. It is called Fluzone Intradermal vaccine. This is also considered a flu shot.

          During the past 12 months, have you had either a seasonal flu shot or a seasonal flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          During what month and year did you receive your most recent flu shot injected into your arm or flu vaccine that was sprayed in your nose?

          1. __/____ Month/Year
          2. Don’t know/Not sure
          3. Refused

          A pneumonia shot or pneumococcal vaccine is usually given only once or twice in a person’s lifetime and is different from the flu shot. Have you ever had a pneumonia shot?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          The next questions are about colorectal cancer screening.

          A Blood stool test is a test that may use a special kit at home to determine whether the stool contains blood. Have you ever had this test using a home kit?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          How long has it been since you had your last blood stool test using a home kit?

          1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
          2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
          3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
          4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
          5. More than 5 years ago
          6. Don’t know/Not sure
          7. Refused

          Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are exams in which a tube is inserted into the rectum to view the colon for signs of cancer or other health problems. Have you ever had either of these exams?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          How long has it been since your last sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy?

          1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
          2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
          3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
          4. Within the past 5 years (3 years but less than 5 years ago)
          5. Within the past 10 years (5 years but less than 10 years ago)
          6. More than 10 years ago
          7. Don’t know/Not sure
          8. Refused

          The next questions are about breast cancer screening.

          A mammogram is an x-ray of each breast to look for breast cancer. Have you ever had a mammogram?

          1. Yes
          2. No
          3. Don’t know/Not sure
          4. Refused

          How long has it been since your last mammogram?

          1. Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)
          2. Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 years ago)
          3. Within the past 3 years (2 years but less than 3 years ago)
          4. Within the past 5 years
          5. Don’t know/Not sure
          6. Refused
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

          Preventing chronic diseases drives improvements in health, quality of life, and value in health spending. National experts agree on a set of recommended clinical preventive services for adults aged 65 or older that can help detect many chronic diseases, delay their onset, or identify them early in more treatable stages, which include influenza vaccination, pneumococcal vaccination, colorectal cancer screening, and mammography screening for women. A promising tool for assessing prevention program effectiveness is the measure of adults being up-to-date with recommended core clinical preventive services. Because it is an all-or-none measure, it cannot increase unless multiple component activities (screenings and vaccinations) are delivered to the same individual. The “up-to-date” measure can help improve program transparency, accountability and decision making by driving the coordination of prevention activities across disease-based “silos” in both the clinical and public health settings.

          This indicator should not be interpreted as covering all recommended clinical preventives services for this age group. It is limited to a select set of clinical preventive services by age and sex for which data are available in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Data on all services in the core set are not available every year given the rotating core questions on BRFSS.

      Caveats and Limitations: 
      The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is conducted independently by each state and therefore methodologies may vary. Pooled national estimates may not take into account these differences and so may differ from estimates obtained using data sources that use methodologies designed to produce national estimates.

      Revision History

      Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

      Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      In 2014, the original baseline was revised from 47.9 (2008) to 39.2 (2012) due to a change in the BRFSS survey methodology impacting the ability to trend data pre/post 2011. The target was adjusted from 52.7 to 43.1 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method. In 2014, the baseline was further revised from 39.2 (2012) to 42.5 (2012) due to a change in programming. The target was adjusted from 43.1 to 46.8 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

      References

      Additional resources about the objective

      1. 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire.
      2. CDC, The State of Aging and Health in America 2007. See reference for new on-line interactive version.
  • OA-3 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of older adults with one or more chronic health conditions who report confidence in managing their conditions

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of older adults with one or more chronic health conditions who report confidence in managing their conditions

    Denominator: 

    Number of older adults with one or more chronic health conditions

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Caveats and Limitations: 
    The BRFSS is conducted independently by each state and therefore methodologies may vary. Pooled national estimates may not take into account these differences and so may differ from estimates obtained using data sources that use methodologies designed to produce national estimates.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.
  • OA-4 Increase the proportion of older adults who receive Diabetes Self-Management Benefits

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Medicare Administrative Data; Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    2.0 (2008)
    Target: 
    2.2
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of Medicare beneficiaries who have been diagnosed with diabetes and for whom there is a Medicare claim for the diabetes self-management training service in the calendar year of interest

    Denominator: 

    Number of Medicare beneficiaries who have been diagnosed with diabetes

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Biennial
    Methodology Notes: 

      The Diabetes Self-Management Benefit is designed to educate beneficiaries in the successful self-management of diabetes. It provides for 10 hours of initial training for a beneficiary who has been diagnosed with diabetes. Almost all U.S. citizens aged 65 and over are enrolled in Medicare.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 2.2 to 2.0 due to a change in programming. The target was adjusted from 2.4 to 2.2 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • OA-5 Reduce the proportion of older adults who have moderate to severe functional limitations

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS); Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    29.3 (2007)
    Target: 
    26.4
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over who have one or more activities of daily living (ADL) limitations OR who are living in a long-term care facility

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2007 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      Because of a health or physical problem, do you have any difficulty with the following?

      • Bathing or showering?
      1. Yes
      2. No
    • Dressing?
      1. Yes
      2. No
    • Eating?
      1. Yes
      2. No
    • Getting in or out of bed or chairs?
      1. Yes
      2. No
    • Walking?
      1. Yes
      2. No
    • Using the Toilet?
      1. Yes
      2. No
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Periodic
    Methodology Notes: 

      Long-term care facility residents are assumed to have at least one ADL limitation and are therefore included under this objective as having a moderate to severe functional limitation.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Sex: 65-74, 75-84, 85+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75-84, 85+

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 28.3 to 29.3 due to a change in programming. The target was adjusted from 25.5 to 26.4 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • OA-6 Increase the proportion of older adults with reduced physical or cognitive function who engage in light, moderate, or vigorous leisure-time physical activities

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/NCHS)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Baseline (Year): 
    32.6 (2008)
    Target: 
    35.9
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over with reduced physical or cognitive function who engage in light, moderate, or vigorous leisure-time physical activities

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over with reduced physical or cognitive function

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data: 

      From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

      [NUMERATOR:]

      How often do you do VIGOROUS LEISURE-TIME physical activities for AT LEAST 10 MINUTES that cause HEAVY sweating or LARGE increases in breathing or heart rate?

      1. Never
      2. Unable to do this type activity
      3. _____ times per day/week/month/year
      4. Refused
      5. Not ascertained
      6. Don't know

      About how long do you do these vigorous leisure-time physical activities each time?

      _____ minutes/hours

      How often do you do LIGHT OR MODERATE LEISURE-TIME physical activities for AT LEAST 10 MINUTES that cause ONLY LIGHT sweating or a SLIGHT to MODERATE increase in breathing or heart rate?

      1. Never
      2. Unable to do this type activity
      3. _____ times per day/week/month/year
      4. Refused
      5. Not ascertained
      6. Don't know

      [NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

      ]

      {Are/Is} [* Read names below] limited in the kind or amount of play activities {he/she/they} can do because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      Do any of the following family members, [* Read names below] receive Special Educational or Early Intervention Services?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem, {do you/does anyone in the family} need the help of other persons with PERSONAL CARE NEEDS, such as eating, bathing, dressing, or getting around inside this home?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      Because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem, do {you/any of these family members [* Read named below] need the help of other persons in handling ROUTINE NEEDS, such as everyday household chores, doing necessary business, shopping, or getting around for other purposes?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      Does a physical, mental, or emotional problem NOW keep {you/any of these family members} from working at a job or business?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      {Are you limited in the kind OR amount of work you/Are any of these family members limited in the kind OR amount of work they} can do because of a physical, mental or emotional problem?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      Because of a health problem, {do you/does anyone in the family} have difficulty walking without using any special equipment?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      {Are you/Is anyone in the family} LIMITED IN ANY WAY because of difficulty remembering or because {you/they} experience periods of confusion?

      1. Yes
      2. No
      3. Refused
      4. Not ascertained
      5. Don't know

      Are {you/any family members} LIMITED IN ANY WAY in any activities because of physical, mental or emotional problems?

      1. Limitation previously mentioned
      2. Yes, limited in some other way
      3. Not limited in any way
      4. Refused
      5. Not ascertained
      6. Don't know
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Physical activity for those with reduced physical or cognitive function is defined as at least 10 minutes per week of any light, moderate, or vigorous activity.

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    In 2012, the original baseline was revised from 33.7 to 32.6 due to a change in programming. The target was adjusted from 37.1 to 35.9 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.
  • OA-7 Increase the proportion of the health care workforce with geriatric certification

    • OA-7.1 Increase the proportion of physicians with geriatric certification

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      2.7 (2009)
      Target: 
      3.0
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of licensed MDs, IMGs, and DOs with board certification or certificate of added qualification in geriatrics

      Denominator: 

      Number of licensed MDs, IMGs, and DOs

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Specialists with geriatric certification are included in the data sources listed.

    • OA-7.2 Increase the proportion of psychiatrists with geriatric certification

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      4.3 (2009)
      Target: 
      4.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of licensed psychiatrists with board certification or certificate of added qualification in geriatrics

      Denominator: 

      Number of licensed psychiatrists

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Specialists with geriatric certification are included in the data sources listed.

    • OA-7.3 Increase the proportion of registered nurses with geriatric certification

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN); Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions (HRSA/BHPr)
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      1.4 (2004)
      Target: 
      1.5
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of registered nurses with gerontological certification (Gerontological Nurse Specialist, Clinical Nurse Specialist in Gerontological Nursing and Gerontological Nurse Practitioner)

      Denominator: 

      Number of registered nurses

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Latest nursing data to match available denominator data are year 2004. The RN denominator data from 2008 Nurse Licensee Volume and NCLEX Examination Statistics (by The National Council of State Boards of Nursing) is available but it double counts nurses registered from different states so they recommended the Census data for denominator.

        Specialists with geriatric certification are included in the data sources listed.

    • OA-7.4 Increase the proportion of dentists with geriatric certification

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Data Source: 
      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      0.20 (2007)
      Target: 
      0.22
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of licensed dentists with gerontological certification

      Denominator: 

      Number of licensed dentists

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Specialists with geriatric certification are included in the data sources listed.

    • OA-7.5 Increase the proportion of physical therapists with geriatric certification

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      0.6 (2009)
      Target: 
      0.7
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of licensed physical therapists with gerontological certification

      Denominator: 

      Number of licensed physical therapists

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Specialists with geriatric certification are included in the data sources listed.

    • OA-7.6 Increase the proportion of registered dieticians with geriatric certification

      About the Data

      Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

      Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
      No
      Measure: 
      percent
      Baseline (Year): 
      0.30 (2009)
      Target: 
      0.33
      Target-Setting Method: 
      10 percent improvement
      Numerator: 

      Number of registered dieticians with gerontological certification

      Denominator: 

      Number of registered dieticians

      Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
      Not applicable
      Data Collection Frequency: 
      Biennial
      Methodology Notes: 

        Specialists with geriatric certification are included in the data sources listed.

  • OA-8 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of noninstitutionalized older adults with disabilities who have an unmet need for long-term services and supports

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Potential Data Source: 
    National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS); National Institute on Aging (NIA)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of non-institutionalized older adults with disabilities who have an unmet need for long term services

    Denominator: 

    Number of non-institutionalized older adults with disabilities

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
  • OA-9 (Developmental) Reduce the proportion of unpaid caregivers of older adults who report an unmet need for caregiver support services

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    Yes
    Measure: 
    percent
    Numerator: 

    Number of unpaid caregivers of older adults who report an unmet need for caregiver support services

    Denominator: 

    Number of unpaid caregivers of older adults

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual

    Revision History

    Any change to the objective text, baseline, target, target-setting method or data source since the Healthy People 2020 launch.

    Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    This objective was archived due to lack of a viable data source.
  • OA-10 Reduce the rate of pressure ulcer-related hospitalizations among older adults

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    Population Estimates; U.S. Census Bureau (Census)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 100,000
    Baseline (Year): 
    985.8 (2007)
    Target: 
    887.3
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of discharges from community, nonrehabilitation hospitals in the United States of persons aged 65 years and over with a principal or secondary diagnosis of pressure ulcer at discharge

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over residing in the United States

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      Discharges with a disposition indicating that the patient was transferred to an acute care hospital are excluded. Community hospitals are defined by the American Hospital Association (AHA) as "non-Federal, short-term, general, and other specialty hospitals, excluding hospital units of institutions." The specialty hospitals included in the AHA definition of community hospitals include: obstetrics-gynecology, ear-nose-throat, orthopedic, and pediatric institutions. The AHA also groups public hospitals and academic medical centers with community hospitals.

      The population estimates used to track this measure are based on estimates produced by the U.S. Census Bureau. Nielsen, a vendor that compiles and adds value to the Census estimates using intra-census methods to estimate household and demographic statistics for geographic areas by year, provided the denominator data.

  • OA-11 Reduce the rate of emergency department (ED) visits due to falls among older adults

    About the Data

    Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

    Data Source: 
    National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/NCHS)
    Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch: 
    No
    Measure: 
    per 100,000 (age adjusted—see Comments)
    Baseline (Year): 
    5,235.1 (2007)
    Target: 
    4,711.6
    Target-Setting Method: 
    10 percent improvement
    Numerator: 

    Number of initial emergency department visits for falls (first listed ICD-9-CM codes E880-E886, E888, E957, E968.1, E987) among persons aged 65 years and over

    Denominator: 

    Number of persons aged 65 years and over

    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective: 
    Not applicable
    Data Collection Frequency: 
    Annual
    Methodology Notes: 

      In the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, data are collected on cause of injury at emergency department visits by means of an open-ended item, “Cause of Injury.” This item asks the respondent (typically hospital staff or Census field representatives) to describe the place and events that preceded the injury, poisoning or adverse effect. Verbatim text is coded by NCHS contracted medical coders using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), Supplementary Classification of External Causes of Injury and Poisoning. Up to three causes may be coded per visit.

      FOR SINGLE DATA YEARS: Emergency department visit rates are calculated using the July 1 estimates of the civilian population from the Vintage matching the data year for the postcensal period based on the 2000 census. For example, July 1, 2007 civilian population estimates from Vintage 2007 are used as the denominator for 2007 rates. Rates for 2010 are also calculated using the July 1 estimates based on the 2000 census.

      Rates by geographic location are for the civilian noninstitutionalized population.

      Age Adjustment Notes: 

      This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

      • Total: 65-74, 75+
      • Sex: 65-74, 75+
      • Race/Ethnicity: 65-74, 75+
      • Geographic Location: 65-74, 75+
  • OA-12 Increase the number of States, the District of Columbia, and Tribes that collect and make publicly available information on the characteristics of victims, perpetrators, and cases of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation