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Maternal, Infant, and Child Health

Infant death is a critical indicator of the health of a population. It reflects the overall state of maternal health as well as the quality and accessibility of primary health care available to pregnant women and infants. Improving birth outcomes can help children to reach their full potential.1

Infant Mortality Rate by Race and Ethnicity, 2014

The infant mortality rate experienced by infants born to black non-Hispanic mothers was more than 2.5 times the rate experienced by infants born to Asian or Pacific Islander mothers (10.9 and 3.9 deaths under 1 year of age per 1,000 live births, respectively).
Black non-Hispanic mothers: 10.9 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
American Indian or Alaska Native mothers: 7.6 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
Hispanic mothers: 5.0 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
White non-Hispanic mothers: 4.9 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
Asian or Pacific Islander mothers: 3.9 infant deaths per 1,000 live births

Data source: Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set, CDC/NCHS.

Infant Deaths

5.8 infant deaths per 1,000 live births occurred within the first year of life in 2014.
Healthy People 2020 Target: 6.0 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
Most Recent(2014): 5.8 infant deaths per 1,000 live births
Target has been exceeded.

Data source: Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set, CDC/NCHS.

Preterm Births

9.6% of live births were delivered preterm (<37 weeks gestation) in 2015.
Healthy People 2020 Target: 9.4%
Most Recent(2015): 9.6%
2.1% decrease needed.
The baseline and target have recently been revised.

Data source: National Vital Statistics System-Natality (NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS.

1 Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy People 2010. 2nd ed. Understanding and Improving Health and Objectives for Improving Health. 2 vols. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. November 2000.