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Mental Health

Latest Data

 

Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

The suicide rate increased 22.0% between 2005 and 2015, from 10.9 to 13.3 per 100,000 population (age adjusted). In 2015, several population groups in specific demographic categories had the lowest suicide rate, including the non-Hispanic black population and females.

Between 2008 and 2015, the proportion of adolescents aged 12–17 years who had a major depressive episode (MDE) in the past 12 months increased 50.6%, from 8.3% to 12.5%. In 2015, several population groups in specific demographic categories had the lowest rate of an MDE in the past 12 months, including the non-Hispanic black population, males, and persons aged 12–13 years.

Leading Health Indicators

Explore the latest data and disparities for each indicator.
Suicides (MHMD-1)
Adolescents who experience major depressive episode (MHMD-4.1)

Suicides (MHMD-1)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective MHMD-1 tracks the suicide rate for the total population.
    • HP2020 Baseline: 11.3 suicides per 100,000 population (age adjusted) occurred in 2007.
    • HP2020 Target: 10.2 suicides per 100,000 population (age adjusted), a 10% improvement over the baseline.
    • The suicide rate for the total population increased by 22.0% between 2005 and 2015, from 10.9 to 13.3 per 100,000 population (age adjusted).
  • Disparities were observed for a number of population groups in 2015. For example:
    • Among racial and ethnic groups, the non-Hispanic black population had the lowest suicide rate, 5.8 per 100,000 population (age adjusted). The age-adjusted rates for other racial and ethnic groups were:
      • 17.0 suicides per 100,000 population among non-Hispanic white persons; more than 2.5 times the best group rate
      • 12.6 suicides per 100,000 population among American Indian or Alaska Native persons; more than twice the best group rate
      • 6.4 suicides per 100,000 population among Asian or Pacific Islander persons
      • 6.2 suicides per 100,000 population among Hispanic or Latino persons

Suicide Rate by Sex, 2015

Suicide Rate by Sex, 2015

Data sources: National Vital Statistics System–Mortality (NVSS–M), CDC/NCHS; and Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.

  • Females had a lower suicide rate than males (6.0 versus 21.1 per 100,000 population, age adjusted). The rate for males was 3.5 times the rate for females.
  • Suicide rates varied by age group. Rates for age groups were:
    • 5.4 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 12–17 years
    • 14.4 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 18–24 years
    • 16.4 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 25–44 years
    • 19.6 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 45–64 years
    • 16.6 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 65 years and over
  • Persons living in metropolitan areas had a lower suicide rate (12.5 per 100,000 population, age adjusted) than persons living in non-metropolitan areas (17.6 per 100,000 population, age adjusted). The suicide rate for persons living in non-metropolitan areas was 40.9% higher than that for persons living in metropolitan areas.

Notes:

  • Unless noted otherwise, all disparities described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends.
  • Data (except those by marital status, country of birth, and age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups <1, 1–4, 5–14, 15–24, 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85+. Data by marital status are adjusted using the age groups 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85+. Data by country of birth are adjusted using the age groups <5, 5–17, 18–24, 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, and 75+. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.
  • Data are available annually from the National Vital Statistics System—Mortality (NVSS—M), CDC/NCHS; and Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.

Adolescents who experience major depressive episodes (MHMD-4.1)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective MHMD-4.1 tracks the proportion of adolescents aged 12–17 years who experienced a major depressive episode (MDE) in the past 12 months.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2008, 8.3% of adolescents aged 12–17 years had an MDE in the past 12 months.
    • Most Recent: In 2015, 12.5% of adolescents aged 12–17 years had an MDE in the past 12 months.
    • HP2020 Target: 7.5%, a 10% improvement over the baseline.
  • Disparities were observed for a number of population groups in 2015. For example:
    • Non-Hispanic black adolescents aged 12–17 years had the lowest rate of experiencing an MDE in the past 12 months, 9.0%. The rates for other racial and ethnic groups were:
      • 16.1% of adolescents who identify with 2 or more races; 79.2% higher than the best group rate
      • 13.4% of non-Hispanic white adolescents; 49.2% higher than the best group rate
      • 13.0% of American Indian or Alaska native adolescents; 45.0% higher than the best group rate
      • 12.9% of Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander adolescents; not significantly different than the best group rate
      • 12.6% of Hispanic or Latino adolescents; 40.9% higher than the best group rate
      • 10.1% of Asian adolescents; not significantly different than the best group rate

Major Depressive Episodes among Adolescents by Sex, 2015

Major Depressive Episodes among Adolescents by Sex, 2015

Data source: National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), SAMHSA.

  • A higher proportion of adolescent females aged 12–17 years had an MDE in the past 12 months, 19.5%, compared to adolescent males, 5.8%. The rate for females was more than 3 times that for males.
  • Among age groups, adolescents aged 12–13 years had the lowest rate of experiencing an MDE in the past 12 months, 7.8%. The rates for other age groups were:
    • 13.8% of adolescents aged 14–15 years; 76.8% higher than the best group rate
    • 15.5% of adolescents aged 16–17 years; twice the best group rate

Notes:

  • Unless noted otherwise, all disparities described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends.
  • The terms "Hispanic or Latino" and "Hispanic" are used interchangeably in this report.
  • Data are available annually from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), SAMHSA.