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Mental Health

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Explore the latest data and disparities for each indicator.

View data for MHMD-1 in DATA2020

Download the latest MHMD-4.1 data in spreadsheet format [20 – KB]

Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

The suicide rate increased 23.9% between 2007 and 2017, from 11.3 to 14.0 per 100,000 population (age adjusted). In 2017, several population groups had the lowest suicide rate in their demographic category, including the Asian or Pacific Islander population, females, and persons living in metropolitan areas.

Between 2008 and 2017, the proportion of adolescents aged 12–17 years who had a major depressive episode (MDE) in the past 12 months increased 60.2%, from 8.3% to 13.3%. In 2017, several population groups had the lowest rate of an MDE in the past 12 months in their demographic category, including the non-Hispanic black population, males, and persons aged 12–13 years.

Suicides (MHMD-1)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective MHMD-1 tracks the suicide rate for the total population.
    • HP2020 Baseline: 11.3 suicides per 100,000 population (age adjusted) occurred in 2007.
    • HP2020 Target: 10.2 suicides per 100,000 population (age adjusted), a 10% improvement over the baseline.
    • The suicide rate for the total population increased by 23.9% between 2007 and 2017, from 11.3 to 14.0 per 100,000 population (age adjusted).
  • Disparities were observed for a number of population groups in 2017. For example:
    • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Asian or Pacific Islander population had the lowest suicide rate, 6.6 per 100,000 population (age adjusted). The age-adjusted rates for other racial and ethnic groups were:
      • 17.8 suicides per 100,000 population among non-Hispanic white persons; more than 2.5 times the best group rate
      • 13.5 suicides per 100,000 population among American Indian or Alaska Native persons; twice the best group rate
      • 6.9 suicides per 100,000 population among non-Hispanic black persons; not statistically different from the best group rate
      • 6.9 suicides per 100,000 population among Hispanic or Latino persons; not statistically different from the best group rate

Suicide Rate by Sex, 2017

Suicide rate by sex

Data source: National Vital Statistics System–Mortality (NVSS–M), CDC/NCHS; Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.

  • Females had a lower suicide rate than males (6.1 versus 22.4 per 100,000 population, age adjusted). The rate for males was more than 3.5 times the rate for females.
  • Suicide rates varied by age group. Rates for age groups were:
    • 6.9 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 12-17 years
    • 16.3 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 18–24 years
    • 17.7 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 25–44 years
    • 19.6 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 45–64 years
    • 16.8 suicides per 100,000 population among persons aged 65 years and over
  • Persons living in metropolitan areas had a lower suicide rate than persons living in non-metropolitan areas (13.2 versus 19.1 per 100,000 population, age adjusted). The suicide rate for persons living in non-metropolitan areas was 44.7% higher than that for persons living in metropolitan areas.

Endnotes:

  • Unrounded values with additional decimal places beyond what are shown here are used in calculating health disparities, including identifying the best group and calculating the differences between groups. Rounded values displayed here are used in calculating changes over time and percent change needed to meet the target.
  • Unless noted otherwise, all differences described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends.
  • Data (except those by age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups <1, 1–4, 5–14, 15–24, 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85+. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates.
  • Data are available annually from the National Vital Statistics System–Mortality (NVSS–M), CDC/NCHS; Bridged-race Population Estimates, CDC/NCHS and Census.

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Adolescents who experience major depressive episodes (MHMD-4.1)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective MHMD-4.1 tracks the proportion of adolescents aged 12–17 years who experienced a major depressive episode (MDE) in the past 12 months.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2008, 8.3% of adolescents aged 12–17 years had an MDE in the past 12 months.
    • HP2020 Target: 7.5%, a 10% improvement over the baseline.
    • Between 2008 and 2017, the proportion of adolescents aged 12–17 years who had an MDE in the past 12 months increased 60.2%, from 8.3% to 13.3%.
  • Disparities were observed for a number of population groups in 2017. For example:
    • Non-Hispanic black adolescents aged 12–17 years had the lowest rate of experiencing an MDE in the past 12 months, 9.5%. The rates for other racial and ethnic groups were:
      • 17.2% of adolescents who identify with 2 or more races; 81.7% higher than the best group rate
      • 14.7% of American Indian or Alaska Native adolescents; 55.2% higher than the best group rate
      • 14.0% of non-Hispanic white adolescents; 47.3% higher than the best group rate
      • 13.8% of Hispanic or Latino adolescents; 45.2% higher than the best group rate
      • 11.6% of Asian adolescents; not significantly different than the best group rate
      • 11.3% of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander adolescents; not significantly different than the best group rate

Major Depressive Episodes (MDEs) among Adolescents by Sex, 2017

Major depressive episodes in adolescents by sex

Data source: National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), SAMHSA.

  • A higher proportion of adolescent females aged 12–17 years had an MDE in the past 12 months compared to adolescent males (20.0% versus 6.8%). The rate for females was more than 2.5 times that for males.
  • Among age groups, adolescents aged 12–13 years had the lowest rate of experiencing an MDE in the past 12 months, 6.9%. The rates for other age groups were:
    • 14.5% of adolescents aged 14–15 years; more than twice the best group rate
    • 17.7% of adolescents aged 16–17 years; more than 2.5 times the best group rate

Endnotes:

  • Unless noted otherwise, all differences described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends.
  • Unrounded values with additional decimal places beyond what are shown here are used in calculating health disparities, including identifying the best group and calculating the differences between groups. Rounded values displayed here are used in calculating changes over time and percent change needed to meet the target.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.
  • Data are available annually from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), SAMHSA.

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