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Clinical Preventive Services

Latest Data

Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

From 2008 to 2013, the percentage of adults aged 50–75 years receiving a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines increased 12%, from 52.1% (age adjusted) to 58.2%. 
 
In the 10-year period between 2001–2004 and 2011–2014, blood pressure control increased by 42% among adults aged 18 years and over with hypertension, from 35.5% (age adjusted) to 50.3%. Several adult population groups in selected demographic categories had the highest rate of blood pressure control, including white non-Hispanic persons, females, and those with activity limitations, public health insurance, and diabetes.     
 
Between 2005–2008 and 2011–2014, the rate of poor glycemic control (HbA1c greater than 9%) among adults aged 18 years and over with diagnosed diabetes increased 13.9%, from 18.0% to 20.5% (age adjusted); however, this change is not statistically significant. 
 
The percentage of children aged 19–35 months who have received the recommended doses of DTaP, polio, MMR, Hib, Hep B, varicella, and PCV vaccines increased 4.7%, from 68.4% in 2012 to 71.6% in 2014. Several population groups in selected demographic categories had the highest vaccination rate, including children of mothers with an advanced degree and those with family incomes 400–599% of the poverty threshold and private health insurance.   
 

Leading Health Indicators

Explore the latest data and disparities for each indicator.
Colorectal Cancer Screening (C-16)
Blood Pressure Control (HDS-12)
Poor Glycemic Control (D-5.1)
Fully Immunized Children (IID-8)

Colorectal Cancer Screening (C-16)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective C-16 tracks the proportion of adults aged 50–75 years who have received a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2008, 52.1% of adults aged 50–75 years received a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines (age adjusted).
    • HP2020 Target: 70.5%, by modeling/projection.
    • Most Recent: In 2013, 58.2% of adults aged 50–75 years received a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines (age adjusted).
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the white non-Hispanic population had the highest rate of colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines in 2013, 60.5% of adults aged 50–75 years (age adjusted), whereas the Hispanic or Latino population had the lowest rate, 43.0%. 
  • In 2013, there was no statistically significant difference between females and males (59.1% versus 57.2%, age adjusted) aged 50–75 years who had received a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines.
  • Among education groups for persons aged 50–75 years, those with an advanced degree had the highest rate of colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines, 72.9% (age adjusted) in 2013. Rates for other education groups were:
    • 42.6% among those with less than a high school education (lowest rate)
    • 53.3% among those with a high school education or GED
    • 57.7% among those with some college education
    • 63.6% among those with an associate’s degree
    • 64.3% among those with a 4-year college degree
  • Among income groups for persons aged 50–75 years, those with family incomes 600% of the poverty threshold or above had the highest rate of colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines, 70.1% (age adjusted) in 2013. Rates for other income groups were:
    • 44.3% among those with family incomes below the poverty threshold (lowest rate)
    • 47.8% among those with family incomes between 100% and 199% of the poverty threshold
    • 55.5% among those with family incomes between 200% and 399% of the poverty threshold
    • 62.0% among those with family incomes between 400% and 599% of the poverty threshold
  • In 2013, persons aged 50–64 years with private health insurance had the highest rate of colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines, 58.5%, among insurance groups. Those with public insurance and the uninsured had rates of 55.2% and 23.6%, respectively. The rate for those with private health insurance was 2.5 times that for the uninsured population.
Persons Receiving a Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Insurance Status, 2013
 
Web graphic of colorectal screening by insurance status
 
Data source: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
 
Endnotes:
  • All disparities described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance. 
  • Data are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups 50–64 and 65–75 years. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates.
  • Data for this measure are available periodically and come from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
  • U.S. Preventative Services Task Force guidelines recommend screening for colorectal cancer using fecal occult blood testing annually, sigmoidoscopy every 5 years with fecal occult blood testing every 3 years, or colonoscopy every 10 years for persons aged 50 to 75 years.

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Blood Pressure Control (HDS-12)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective HDS-12 tracks the proportion of adults with hypertension whose blood pressure is under control (systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure <90 mmHg).
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2005–08, 43.7% of adults aged 18 years and over with hypertension had it under control (age adjusted). 
    • HP2020 Target: 61.2%, a 40% improvement over the baseline. 
    • The percentage of adults aged 18 years and over with hypertension who had their blood pressure under control increased by 42% between 2001–04 and 2011–14, from 35.5% to 50.3% (age adjusted).
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the white non-Hispanic population had the highest rate of blood pressure control, 54.8% of persons aged 18 years and over with hypertension (age adjusted) in 2011–14, whereas the Asian non-Hispanic population had a rate of 40.1%, the black non-Hispanic population had a rate of 43.1% (age adjusted), and the Hispanic or Latino population had a rate of 45.0% (age adjusted). 
  • Females aged 18 years and over with hypertension had a higher (better) rate of blood pressure control than males (57.7% versus 44.3%, age adjusted) in 2011–14. 

Controlled High Blood Pressure by Sex, 2011–14

Web graphic of controlled high blood pressure by sex

Data source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
 
  • Persons aged 20 years and over with hypertension with activity limitations had a higher (better) rate of blood pressure control than persons without activity limitations (62.9% versus 46.7%, age adjusted) in 2011–14. 
  • Persons aged 45–64 years with hypertension had the highest rate of blood pressure control, 56.6% in 2011–14, among broad age groups. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 43.4% among persons aged 18–44 
    • 52.1% among persons aged 65 years and over (not significantly different than the best group rate) 
  • When further refining the age groups, persons aged 65–74 years with hypertension had the highest rate of blood pressure control, 58.5% in 2011–14. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 46.1% among persons aged 25–44 years 
    • 56.6% among persons aged 45–54 years (not significantly different than the best group rate)
    • 56.6% among persons aged 55–64 years (not significantly different than the best group rate)
    • 48.0% among persons aged 75–79 years 
    • 42.2% among persons aged 80 years and over 
  • Adults aged 18 years and over with hypertension born in the U.S. had a higher rate of blood pressure control than persons born outside the U.S. (51.4% versus 43.7%, age adjusted) in 2011–14.  
  • Among health insurance status groups, persons aged 18–64 years with hypertension with public health insurance had the highest rate of blood pressure control, 56.5% (age adjusted) in 2011–14, whereas persons with private insurance had a rate of 52.9% (not significantly different than the best group rate) and persons with no health insurance had a rate of 33.7%. 
  • In 2011–14, adults aged 18 years and over with hypertension with diabetes had a higher (better) rate of blood pressure control than those without diabetes (63.7% versus 47.9%, age adjusted).  
  • In 2011–14, adults aged 20 years and over with hypertension who were obese had a higher (better) rate of blood pressure control than persons who were not obese (52.2% versus 49.5%, age adjusted). 
Endnotes:
  • Unless otherwise stated, all comparisons described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance.
  • Data for this measure are available biennially and come from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS. Preferably 4 years of data are pooled for analysis when available.  
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.  
  • Data (except those by disability status, education status, health insurance coverage, obesity status, and age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups 18–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and 80 years and over. Data by disability and obesity status are adjusted using the age groups 20–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and 80 years and over. Data by education status are adjusted using the age groups 25–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and 80 years and over. Data by health insurance coverage are adjusted using the age groups 18–49, 50–59, and 60–64 years. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates. 
  • Blood pressure control is defined as an average systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg and an average diastolic blood pressure <90 mmHg among adults with hypertension. Hypertension is defined as an average systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg, an average diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, or self-reported current use of blood pressure–lowering medication. Pregnant women are excluded from analyses.

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Poor Glycemic Control (D-5.1)

  • Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) objective D-5.1 tracks the proportion of adults with diagnosed diabetes who have poor glycemic control (HbA1c greater than 9%).
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2005–08, 18.0% of adults aged 18 years and over with diagnosed diabetes had poor glycemic control (age adjusted).  
    • HP2020 Target: 16.2%, a 10% improvement over the baseline. 
    • Most Recent: In 2011–14, 20.5% of adults aged 18 years and over with diagnosed diabetes had poor glycemic control (age adjusted).  
  • Among racial and ethnic groups in 2011–14, the white non-Hispanic population had the lowest (best) rate of poor glycemic control, 14.6% of adults aged 18 years and over with diagnosed diabetes (age adjusted). The rate for the Hispanic population (30.2%, age adjusted) was more than twice the rate of the white non-Hispanic population.
  • Rates (age adjusted) for other race/ethnicity groups were:
    • 25.5% among the black non-Hispanic population 
    • 17.3% among the Asian non-Hispanic population (not significantly different than the best group rate)
  • Persons with diagnosed diabetes aged 65 years and over had the lowest rate of poor glycemic control among age groups, 9.2% in 2011–14. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 17.8% among persons aged 45–64 years
    • 26.4% among persons aged 18–44 years; more than 2.5 times the best group rate

Poor Glycemic Control by Age, 2011–14

Web graphic on Poor Glycemic Control by Age

Data source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.

  • Adults aged 18–64 years with diagnosed diabetes who had health insurance had a lower rate of poor glycemic control compared to adults who did not have health insurance (20.3% versus 31.4%, age adjusted, in 2011–14).
  • Comparisons for 2011–14 among sex, country of birth, disability status, and obesity status groups were not statistically significant.
Endnotes:
  • Unless otherwise stated, all comparisons described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance.
  • Data for this measure are available biennially and come from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS. Preferably 4 years of data are pooled for analysis when available.  
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.  
  • Data (except those by education status, health insurance coverage, obesity status, marital status, disability status, and age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups 18–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and 80 years and over. Data by education status are adjusted using the age groups 25–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and 80 years and over. Data by health insurance coverage are adjusted using the age groups 18–49, 50–59, and 60–64 years. Data by obesity status, disability status, and marital status are age adjusted using the groups 20–49, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and 80 years and over. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates. 
  • Diagnosed diabetes is self-reported based on the question “Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have diabetes or sugar diabetes?” Women who reported having diabetes only during pregnancy and persons who report being diagnosed as having ‘borderline’ diabetes are excluded. Women who are pregnant at the time of the exam are also excluded.

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Fully Immunized Children (IID-8)

  • Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) objective IID-8 tracks the proportion of children aged 19–35 months who have received the recommended doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP); polio; measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR); Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib); hepatitis B (Hep B); varicella; and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) vaccines.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2012, 68.4% of children aged 19–35 months had received the recommended doses of DTaP, polio, MMR, Hib, Hep B, varicella, and PCV vaccines.
    • HP2020 Target: 80.0%, consistent with national programs.
    • Most Recent: In 2014, 71.6% of children aged 19–35 months had received the recommended doses of DTaP, polio, MMR, Hib, Hep B, varicella, and PCV vaccines.
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, American Indian or Alaska Native children aged 19–35 months had the highest rate of complete vaccination, 75.9% in 2014, whereas black non-Hispanic children had the lowest rate, 65.4%. 
  • Girls aged 19–35 months had a higher rate of receiving all recommended vaccinations than boys (73.0% versus 70.4%) in 2014.  
  • In 2014, children aged 19–35 months of mothers aged 25 years and over with an advanced degree had the highest rate of complete vaccination (80.9%) among education groups, while children of mothers with less than a high school education had the lowest rate (68.0%).
  • Children aged 19–35 months in families with incomes 400–599% of the poverty threshold had the highest rate of complete vaccination (80.6%) among income groups in 2014. Rates for children in other income groups were:
    • 66.2% for those with family incomes under the poverty threshold
    • 70.4% for those with family incomes 100% to 199% of the poverty threshold
    • 74.0% for those with family incomes 200% to 399% of the poverty threshold
    • 78.3% for those with family incomes 600% or more of the poverty threshold (not significantly different than the best group rate)
  • Children aged 19–35 months with private health insurance had the highest rate of complete vaccination (76.1%) among insurance groups in 2014. Rates for children in other insurance groups were:
    • 68.9% for those with public insurance
    • 46.5% for those without insurance

Children Receiving All Recommended Vaccinations by Insurance Status, 2014

Web graphic of children receiving recommended vaccinations by insurance status

Data source: National Immunization Survey (NIS), CDC/NCIRD and CDC/NCHS.
 
Endnotes:
  • All disparities described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance. 
  • Data for this measure are available annually and come from the National Immunization Survey (NIS), CDC/NCIRD and CDC/NCHS.
  • Public and private insurance are not mutually exclusive. About 5% of children with health insurance are included in both categories. 
  • Complete vaccination is defined as receipt of the following recommended doses of each of the following vaccines: 4 DTap, 3 polio, 1 MMR, 3 or 4 Hib (depending on product type received, including primary series plus the booster dose), 3 Hep B, 1 varicella, and 4 PCV.