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Access to Health Services

Latest Data

Explore the latest data and disparities for each indicator.

 

Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

Between 2008 and 2018, the rate of persons aged less than 65 years with health insurance increased 7.0%, from 83.2% to 89.0%. In 2018, several population groups in specific demographic categories had the highest rate of health insurance coverage, including the Asian population and those with an advanced degree.   
 
Between 2007 and 2016, there was no statistically significant change in the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider (76.3% in 2007 and 76.4% in 2016). In 2016, several population groups in specific demographic categories had the highest rate of having a usual primary care provider, including Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander persons, those with an advanced degree, and those with public health insurance.   

Health Insurance (AHS-1.1) Bullets

  • Healthy People 2020 objective AHS-1.1 tracks the proportion of persons aged less than 65 years with health (medical) insurance.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2008, 83.2% of persons aged less than 65 years had health insurance. 
    • HP2020 Target: 100% or total coverage.
    • Between 2008 and 2018, the rate of persons with health insurance increased 7.0%, from 83.2% to 89.0%.
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Asian population aged less than 65 years had the highest rate of health insurance coverage, 92.6% in 2018. Rates for the other racial/ethnic groups were:
    • 71.4% among the American Indian or Alaska Native populations; the best group rate was 29.8% higher
    • 79.9% among the Hispanic or Latino population; the best group rate was 16.0% higher
    • 90.6% among the Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander population; not significantly different than the best group rate
    • 87.9% among the black non-Hispanic population; the best group rate was 5.4% higher
    • 89.9% among persons of 2 or more races; the best group rate was 3.1% higher
    • 92.2% among the white non-Hispanic population; not significantly different than the best group rate
  • The rate of health insurance coverage among females aged less than 65 years was 2.5% higher than the rate of health insurance coverage among males (90.1% versus 87.9%) in 2018.
  • Those aged 25–64 years with an advanced degree had the highest rate of health insurance coverage among educational attainment groups, 96.2% in 2018. Rates for other groups were:
    • 67.0% among persons with less than a high school education; the best group rate was 43.6% higher
    • 82.4% among persons with a high school education; the best group rate was 16.7% higher
    • 87.6% among persons with some college education; the best group rate was 9.8% higher
    • 89.8% among persons with an associates degree; the best group rate was 7.1% higher
    • 94.0% among persons with a 4-year college degree; the best group rate was 2.3% higher

Persons with Health Insurance by Educational Attainment, 2018

For persons aged 25-64 years, the health insurance rate for those with an advanced degree was 43.6% higher than the rate for those without a high school education.
Data source: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
 
  • Among family income groups, those with family incomes 600% of the poverty threshold or above had the highest rate of health insurance coverage, 96.8% in 2018. Rates for other family income groups were:
    • 80.1% among persons with family incomes less than 100% of the poverty threshold; the best group rate was 20.8% higher
    • 81.4% among persons with family incomes between 100% and 199% of the poverty threshold; the best group rate was 18.9% higher
    • 88.6% among persons with family incomes between 200% and 399% of the poverty threshold; the best group rate was 9.2% higher
    • 94.4% among persons with family incomes between 400% and 599% of the poverty threshold; the best group rate was 2.6% higher
  • Persons aged less than 18 years had the highest rate of health insurance coverage among broad age groups, 94.8% in 2018. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 84.6% among those aged 18–44 years; the best group rate was 12.0% higher
    • 89.8% among those aged 45–64 years; the best group rate was 5.6% higher
  • Persons aged less than 65 years born in the U.S. had a higher rate of health insurance coverage (91.1%) compared to those born outside the U.S. (78.1%) in 2018. The rate for those born in the U.S. was about 16.6% higher than the rate for those born outside the U.S.
Endnotes:
  • Unless otherwise specified, all differences described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends.
  • Unrounded values with additional decimal places beyond what are shown here are used in calculating health disparities, including identifying the best group and calculating the differences between groups. Rounded values displayed here are used in calculating changes over time and percent change needed to meet the target.  
  • Data for this measure are available annually and come from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report. 
  • Health care coverage is defined as having any type of public or private health insurance or health care plan, including those obtained by employment, direct purchase, and government programs such as Medicare, Medigap, Medicaid, military health care/VA, CHAMPUS/TRICARE/CHAMPVA, Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and other state-sponsored or government-sponsored health plans. Private plans that only provide cash during hospitalization or only pay for one type of service (e.g., nursing home care, accidents, vision, dental care) are excluded. Persons with Indian Health Service coverage only are considered to have no coverage. For additional indicator information (data details), see: http://www.healthypeople.gov/node/3966/data_details.

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Usual Primary Care Provider (AHS-3) Bullets

  • Healthy People 2020 objective AHS-3 tracks the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2007, 76.3% of persons had a usual primary care provider. 
    • HP2020 Target: 83.9% or a 10% improvement over the baseline.
    • Between 2007 and 2016, there was no statistically significant change in the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider (76.3% in 2007 and 76.4% in 2016). 

Persons with a Usual Primary Care Provider by Health Insurance Status, 2016

For persons aged less than 65 years, the rate of having a usual primary care provider for those with public insurance was 81.1% higher than the rate for uninsured persons.

Data source: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ.
 
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander population had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 82.2% in 2016. Rates for the other racial/ethnic groups were:
    • 69.4% among the Hispanic or Latino population; the best group rate was 18.4% higher
    • 72.3% among the black non-Hispanic population; the best group rate was 13.8% higher
    • 71.8% among the Asian population; the best group rate was 14.6% higher
    • 73.4% among the American Indian or Alaska Native population; not significantly different than the best group rate
    • 79.6% among the white non-Hispanic population; not significantly different than the best group rate
    • 78.1% among persons of 2 or more races; not significantly different than the best group rate
  • The proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider was 8.6% higher among females than males (79.5% versus 73.2%) in 2016.
  • Among educational attainment groups, those aged 25 years and over with an advanced degree had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 78.4% in 2016. Rates for the other educational attainment groups were:
    • 69.1% among persons with less than a high school education; the best group rate was 13.4% higher
    • 72.3% among persons with a high school education; the best group rate was 8.5% higher
    • 75.0% among persons with some college education; the best group rate was 4.5% higher
    • 74.4% among persons with a 4-year college degree; the best group rate was 5.4% higher  
  • Among family income groups, those with family incomes 600% of the poverty threshold or above had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 79.8% in 2016. Rates for the other family income groups were:
    • 72.8% among persons with family incomes less than 100% of the poverty threshold; the best group rate was 9.6% higher
    • 73.7% among persons with family incomes between 100% and 199% of the poverty threshold; the best group rate was 8.2% higher
    • 75.6% among persons with family incomes between 200% and 399% of the poverty threshold; the best group rate was 5.6% higher
    • 78.9% among persons with family incomes between 400% and 599% of the poverty threshold; not significantly different than the best group rate
  • Persons aged less than 18 years had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider among broad age groups, 89.6% in 2016. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 60.6% among those aged 18–44 years; the best group rate was 48.0% higher
    • 78.8% among those aged 45–64 years; the best group rate was 13.8% higher
    • 89.3% among persons aged 65 years and over; not significantly different than the best group rate
  • Persons born in the U.S. had a 20.2% higher proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider (78.3%) compared to those born outside the U.S. (65.1%) in 2016.
  • Among health insurance groups for persons aged less than 65 years, those with public insurance only had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider (79.5%) in 2016. Rates for the other health insurance status groups were:
    • 43.9% among the uninsured population; the best group rate was 81.1% higher
    • 76.2% among persons with private insurance; the best group rate was 4.4% higher
Endnotes:
  • Unless otherwise specified, all differences described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance using a 1-sided test for disparities and a 2-sided test for trends. 
  • Unrounded values with additional decimal places beyond what are shown here are used in calculating health disparities, including identifying the best group and calculating the differences between groups. Rounded values displayed here are used in calculating changes over time and percent change needed to meet the target.  
  • Data for this measure are available annually and come from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report. 
  • A usual primary care provider is defined as a particular doctor’s office, health center, or other place that a person usually goes to if sick or needing advice about health; for new health problems; for preventive health care, such as general check-ups, examinations, and immunizations; and for referrals to other health professionals when needed. For additional indicator information (data details), see: https://www.healthypeople.gov/node/3970/data_details.

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