You are here

Law and Health Policy

Upcoming Webinar

Using Law and Policy as Tools to Support Healthy Aging in Healthy Communities
Join us on Tuesday, December 11 at 1:00 p.m. ET to learn about using laws and policies as tools to create communities that are supportive and connected environments for older adults.
Register now.

Advancing Public Health Through Law and Policy

Law and policy are among the most effective tools to improve health. Many of the greatest public health successes in the United States are the result of legal or policy interventions, such as smoke-free air laws and mandatory seatbelt laws.1 Yet many people may not be aware of the precise impact these interventions and approaches can have on population health.

The Healthy People 2020 Law and Health Policy project aims to help close that gap by showcasing evidence-based legal and policy interventions that impact public health. The project is a partnership between the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the CDC Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Law and Health Policy Resources

Project partners are working with subject matter experts and federal stakeholders to develop a series of topic-specific reports and other evidence-based products such as infographics and success stories, or "Bright Spots". These publications highlight laws and policies with the potential to impact specific Healthy People topic areas and objectives.

Learn more and access resources by topic:

Upcoming Resources

In the coming months, project partners plan to release additional reports and resources on the following topics:

  • Disability and Health
  • Healthy Aging (including Older Adults)
  • Maternal, Infant, and Child Health
  • Mental Health and Mental Disorders
  • Oral Health
  • Substance Abuse
  • General Law and Policy Resources

Report Authors and Working Groups

Authors of the topic-specific reports were chosen based on their background and subject matter expertise—usually from outside the federal government. Up to 4 co-authors worked on each report with assistance from a working group of federal and non-government from varying disciplines and practice areas relevant to the report’s subject matter.

Other groups who provided input and support for the reports and related resources include the Healthy People 2020 Federal Interagency Workgroup (FIW), the Healthy People 2020 topic area workgroups, and the project partners.

Back to Top

Footnotes

  • 1. Domestic public health achievements team. Ten great public health achievements — United States, 2001–2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2011;60(19):619-62.

Back to Top