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Disparities Data Details MICH-7.1 by Geographic Location for 2016

Disparities Details by Geographic Location for 2016
MICH-7.1 : Cesarean births among low-risk women with no prior births (percent)
This chart compares rates by population.

2020 Baseline (year): 27.4 (2007)
2020 Target: 24.7 1
Desired Direction: ↓ Decrease Desired
Data Source: National Vital Statistics System-Natality (NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS
Error Bar (I) represents the 95% confidence interval.
Additional footnotes may apply to these data. Please refer to footnotes below the data table for further information.
See also Disparities Overview by Geographic Location for MICH-7.1

MICH-7.1 Reduce cesarean births among low-risk women with no prior births

Cesarean births among low-risk women with no prior births (percent)

2020 Baseline (year): 27.4 (2007)
2020 Target: 24.7 1
Desired Direction: ↓ Decrease Desired
Geographic Location 2016 Disparity
Non-metropolitan 25.2
CI 24.9/25.4
SE 0.109
÷ 1.000
Best rate
Metropolitan 25.8
CI 25.7/25.9
SE 0.041
÷ 1.026
CI
1.000/ 1.034

Data are subject to revision and may have changed since a previous release.

Unless noted otherwise, any age-adjusted data are adjusted using the year 2000 standard population.

Data are not available or not collected for populations not shown.

CI: 95% confidence interval.

Summary measures of health disparities by Geographic Location — 2016
  • The better group rate for this objective, 25.2%, was attained by persons living in a non-metropolitan area.
  • The worse group rate for this objective, 25.8%, was attained by persons living in a metropolitan area.
  • The absolute difference (or range) between the best and worst group rates was 0.7 percentage points.
  • The worst group rate was <1.100 times the best group rate.
Detailed measures of health disparities by Geographic Location — 2016

Persons living in a non-metropolitan area achieved the better group rate for this objective, 25.2%.

The rate among persons living in a metropolitan area was <1.1 times the better group rate.

FootnotesShow Footnotes