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Disability and Health

Living in congregate care facilities, adults with disabilities, 2008–2010

Decrease desired

DH-12.1 bar graph

Objective DH-12.1

SOURCE: Survey of State Developmental Disabilities Directors.
NOTE: Data are for the number of adults with disabilities (aged 22 and over) who were living in congregate care facilities with 16 beds or more.

The number of adults aged 22 and over with disabilities living in congregate care facilities decreased 2.5% between 2008 and 2010, from 57,462 to 56,028; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of this change.


Participation in regular education programs, children and youth with disabilities, 2006–07 to 2008–09

Increase desired

DH-14 bar graph

Objective DH-14

SOURCE: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) database, Department of Education.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of children and youth aged 6–21 years with disabilities in classroom settings who spent at least 80 percent of their time in regular education programs.

The proportion of children and youth aged 6–21 years with disabilities in classroom settings who spent at least 80 percent of their time in regular education programs increased 8.0% from 2006–07 to 2008–09, from 53.7% to 58.0%; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of this change.


Unemployment, adults with disabilities, 2009–2011

Decrease desired

DH-15 bar graph

Objective DH-15

SOURCE: Current Population Survey (CPS), Department of Commerce/Census Bureau and DOL/BLS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 16–64 with disabilities who were unemployed.

The unemployment rate among adults aged 16–64 with disabilities increased 3.4% between 2009 and 2011, from 14.5% to 15.0%; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of this change.


Employment, adults with disabilities, 2009–2011

Increase desired

DH-16 bar graph

Objective DH-16

SOURCE: Current Population Survey (CPS), Department of Commerce/Census Bureau and DOL/BLS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 16–64 with disabilities who were employed.

The employment rate among adults aged 16–64 with disabilities decreased 7.3% between 2009 and 2011, from 19.2% to 17.8%; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of this change.


Sufficient social and emotional support, adults with disabilities, 2008–2010

Increase desired

DH-17 bar graph

Objective DH-17

SOURCE: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), CDC/PHSIPO.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of adults with disabilities who reported sufficient social and emotional support, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of adults with disabilities who reported sufficient social and emotional support did not change significantly between 2008 and 2010, from 69.5% to 70.0% (age adjusted).


Sufficient social and emotional support, adults with disabilities, 2010

Increase desired

DH-17 horizontal bar graph

Objective DH-17

SOURCE: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), CDC/PHSIPO.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults with disabilities who reported sufficient social and emotional support, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The single-race categories include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Data by education are for persons aged 25 and over.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2010, 70.0% (age adjusted) of adults with disabilities reported sufficient social and emotional support. This rate varied by race and ethnicity as well as by education. For example:

  • 73.2% (age adjusted) of non-Hispanic white adults with disabilities reported sufficient social and emotional support, compared with: 59.0% of non-Hispanic black adults with disabilities; 59.6% of American Indian or Alaska Native adults with disabilities; and 60.4% of Hispanic or Latino adults with disabilities. When expressed as adults with disabilities who reported insufficient social or emotional support, the rates for those three groups were all about one and a half times the rate for non-Hispanic white adults with disabilities.
  • Rates increased as educational attainment increased. 54.3% (age adjusted) of adults aged 25 and over with disabilities who had less than a high school education reported sufficient social and emotional support, compared with 80.0% of those who had a four-year college degree or above. When expressed as adults aged 25 and over with disabilities who reported insufficient social or emotional support, the rate for those who had less than a high school education was almost two and a half times the rate for those who had a four-year college degree or above.

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