Skip Navigation

Vision

Vision screening, preschool children, 2002 and 2008

Increase desired

V-1

Objective V-1

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of preschool children aged 5 years and under who had ever received vision screening. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The single-race categories include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of preschool children aged 5 years and under whose parents reported that their child had ever received vision screening increased 10.2% between 2002 and 2008, from 36.4% to 40.1%, and varied by race and ethnicity; however, these differences were not statistically significant. For example, in 2008, 41.3% of non-Hispanic white preschool children had received vision screening, compared with 40.6% of non-Hispanic black, 37.7% of Hispanic or Latino, and 32.0% of Asian preschool children.


Blindness and visual impairment, children and adolescents, 2000–2010

Decrease desired

V-2 Line

Objective V-2

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for children and adolescents aged 17 years and under who had trouble seeing even when wearing glasses or contact lenses.

In 2010, 23.7 per 1,000 children aged 17 years and under had trouble seeing even when wearing glasses or contact lenses, compared with 19.0 per 1,000 in 2000. However, this 24.7% increase between 2000 and 2010 was not statistically significant.


Blindness and visual impairment, children and adolescents, 2010

Decrease desired

V-2 Bar

Objective V-2

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for children and adolescents aged 17 years and under who had trouble seeing even when wearing glasses or contact lenses. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The single-race categories include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2010, 23.7 per 1,000 children aged 17 years and under had trouble seeing even when wearing glasses or contact lenses. Rates varied by family income and activity limitation status:

  • 33.6 per 1,000 children aged 17 years and under whose family incomes were below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) had trouble seeing even when wearing glasses or contact lenses, more than two and a half times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL, 13.0 per 1,000.
  • 78.0 per 1,000 children aged 17 years and under with activity limitations had trouble seeing even when wearing glasses or contact lenses, almost four and a half times the rate for those without activity limitations, 18.3 per 1,000.

Comprehensive eye exam in past 2 years, adults, 2008

Increase desired

V-4

Objective V-4

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who had a comprehensive eye examination, including dilation, within the past 2 years, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The single-race categories include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Data by education are for persons aged 25 and over. Data by health insurance status are for persons aged 18–64.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2008, 55% (age adjusted) of adults aged 18 and over had had a comprehensive dilated eye examination within the past 2 years. This rate varied by sex, race and ethnicity, education, and health insurance status. For example:

  • 58.9% (age adjusted) of male adults had had a comprehensive dilated eye examination within the past 2 years, compared with 51% of female adults.
  • 56.5% (age adjusted) of non-Hispanic white adults had had a comprehensive dilated eye examination within the past 2 years, compared with 48.1% of Hispanic or Latino adults.
  • 66.5% (age adjusted) of adults aged 25 and over with an advanced degree had had a comprehensive dilated eye examination within the past 2 years, compared with 43.3% of those with less than a high school education.
  • 55.0% (age adjusted) of adults aged 18–64 with health insurance had had a comprehensive dilated eye examination within the past 2 years, compared with 32.5% of those without health insurance.

Visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors, 2005–08

Decrease desired

V-5.1 Gender and Race
V-5.1-Income and Diabetes

Objective V-5.1

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for persons aged 12 years and over with visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The categories `white, non-Hispanic’ and `black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one race. Persons of Mexican-American origin may be of any race.
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2005–08, 136.1 per 1,000 persons aged 12 years and over (age adjusted) experienced visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors. This rate varied by race and ethnicity, family income, and diabetes status:

  • 119.4 per 1,000 non-Hispanic white persons aged 12 years and over (age adjusted) experienced visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors, compared with 164.8 per 1,000 among non-Hispanic black and 179.7 per 1,000 among Mexican American persons aged 12 and over.
  • The rate of visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors decreased as family incomes increased, from 170.8 per 1,000 (age adjusted) among persons aged 12 years and over whose family incomes were below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) to 105.9 per 1,000 among those at or above 500% of the FPL.
  • 184.6 per 1,000 persons aged 12 years and over with diabetes (age adjusted) experienced visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors, compared with 134.4 per 1,000 among those without diabetes.

Back to Top

Read A User’s Guide to the National Snapshots