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Sleep HealthNew

Crashes involving drowsy drivers, 2005–2010

Decrease desired

SH-2 graph

Objective SH-2

SOURCE: General Estimates System (GES), DOT/NHTSA.
NOTE: Data are for vehicular crashes per 100 million miles traveled that were due to drowsy driving.

The rate of crashes involving drowsy drivers decreased 20.0% between 2005 and 2010, from 3.0 to 2.4 per 100 million miles traveled.


Sufficient sleep, adolescents, 2011

Increase desired

SH-3 graph

Objective SH-3

SOURCE: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), CDC/NCCDPHP.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of students in grades 9–12 who reported getting sufficient sleep (8 hours or more) on an average school night. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The single-race categories include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2011, 31.4% of students in grades 9–12 reported getting sufficient sleep (8 hours or more) on an average school night. This rate varied by sex, race and ethnicity, and grade; however, differences by race and ethnicity were not statistically significant:

  • 33.6% of male students in grades 9–12 reported getting sufficient sleep on an average school night, compared with 29.1% of female students in grades 9–12.
  • 36.8% of American Indian or Alaska Native students in grades 9–12 reported getting sufficient sleep on an average school night, compared with: 32.7% of non-Hispanic white students; 30.7% of Hispanic or Latino students; 28.9% of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander students; 28.1% of students of two or more races; 27.9% of non-Hispanic black students; and 24.5% of Asian students in grades 9–12.
  • 40.0% of 9th graders reported getting sufficient sleep on an average school night, compared with: 33.4% of 10th graders; 26.7% of 11th graders; and 23.8% of 12th graders. When expressed as students in grades 9–12 who reported getting insufficient sleep on an average school night, the rate for 12th graders was almost one and a half times the rate for 9th graders.

Sufficient sleep, adults, 2011

Increase desired

SH-4 graph

Objective SH-4

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported getting sufficient sleep (8 hours or more for adults aged 18–21; 7 hours or more for adults aged 22 and over) during a 24-hour period. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2011, 69.2% of adults reported getting sufficient sleep (8 hours or more for adults aged 18–21; 7 hours or more for adults aged 22 and over). This rate varied by race and ethnicity as well as by age:

  • 70.7% of non-Hispanic white adults reported getting sufficient sleep, compared with: 59.5% of non-Hispanic black adults; 57.7% of adults of two or more races; and 54.9% of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander adults. When expressed as adults who reported getting insufficient sleep, the rate for Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander adults was about one and a half times the rate for non-Hispanic white adults, whereas the rates for non-Hispanic black adults and adults of two or more races were almost one and a half times the rate for non-Hispanic white adults.
  • 76.9% of adults aged 65 and over reported getting sufficient sleep, compared with: 68.7% of adults aged 25–44; 67.6% of adults aged 45–64; and 64.7% of adults aged 18–24. When expressed as adults who reported getting insufficient sleep, the rates for these three age groups were about one and a half times the rate for adults aged 65 and over.

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