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Respiratory Diseases

Asthma deaths, older adults, 1999–2009

Decrease desired

RD-1.3

Objective RD-1.3

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Mortality (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for ICD-10 codes J45–J46 reported as underlying cause of death among older adults, aged 65 and over. Prior to 2003 only one race category could be recorded; recording more than one race was not an option. Beginning in 2003 multiple-race data were reported by some states; multiple-race data were bridged to the single-race categories for comparability. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

Between 1999 and 2009, the rate of deaths due to asthma among older adults, aged 65 and over, declined 44.2%, from 69.5 to 38.8 deaths per million, and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2009, non-Hispanic white older adults had 35.6 asthma deaths per million population, compared with 59.3 asthma deaths per million among non-Hispanic black older adults and 61.7 asthma deaths per million among Asian or Pacific Islander older adults, both over one and a half times the rate for non-Hispanic white older adults.


Activity limitations due to asthma, adults with asthma, 2008–2011

Decrease desired

RD-4

Objective RD-4

* Data for 2009 and 2010 do not meet the criteria for statistical reliability, data quality, or confidentiality; therefore, those data are not shown here.
SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over with current asthma who had experienced activity limitations due to asthma, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population.
I = 95% confidence interval.

There was no significant change between 2008 (12.7%, age adjusted) and 2011 (12.5%, age adjusted) in the rate of activity limitation due to asthma among adults aged 18 and over with current asthma. Rates varied by family income. For example, in 2011, 4.7% (age adjusted) of adults with current asthma whose family incomes were at or above 600% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) experienced activity limitations due to asthma, compared with:

  • 12.1% of adults with current asthma whose family incomes were at 200%–399% of the FPL; more than two and a half times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL.
  • 15.4% of adults with current asthma whose family incomes were at 100%–199% of the FPL; almost three and a half times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL.
  • 18.2% of adults with current asthma whose family incomes were below the FPL; nearly four times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL.

Asthma education, persons with asthma, 2003 and 2008

Increase desired

RD-6

Objective RD-6

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of persons with current asthma who had ever taken a course or class on how to manage their asthma, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The categories `white, non-Hispanic’ and `black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

There was no significant change between 2003 (13.3%, age adjusted) and 2008 (12.1%, age adjusted) in the proportion of persons with current asthma who had ever taken a course or class on how to manage their asthma. Rates of asthma patient education varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2008, 20.1% (age adjusted) of the non-Hispanic black population with asthma had ever taken a course or class on how to manage their asthma, compared with 9.9% of the non-Hispanic white population with asthma.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) deaths, adults, 1999–2009

Decrease desired

RD-10 Race

Objective RD-10

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Mortality (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for ICD-10 codes J40–J44 reported as underlying cause of death among adults aged 45 and over and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Prior to 2003 only one race category could be recorded; recording more than one race was not an option. Beginning in 2003 multiple-race data were reported by some states; multiple-race data were bridged to the single-race categories for comparability. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

The rate of deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among adults aged 45 and over declined 5.7% between 1999 and 2009, from 123.9 to 116.8 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2009, Asian or Pacific Islander adults aged 45 and over had 33.7 COPD deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted), compared with:

  • 48.1 deaths per 100,000 among Hispanic or Latino adults aged 45 and over; nearly one and a half times the rate among Asian or Pacific Islander adults aged 45 and over.
  • 77.1 deaths per 100,000 among non-Hispanic black adults aged 45 and over; almost two and a half times the rate among Asian or Pacific Islander adults aged 45 and over.
  • 78.6 deaths per 100,000 among American Indian or Alaska Native adults aged 45 and over; almost two and a half times the rate among Asian or Pacific Islander adults aged 45 and over.
  • 130.5 deaths per 100,000 among non-Hispanic white population adults aged 45 and over; almost four times the rate among Asian or Pacific Islander adults aged 45 and over.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) deaths, adults, 1999–2009

Decrease desired

RD-10 Gender

Objective RD-10

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Mortality (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for ICD-10 codes J40–J44 reported as underlying cause of death among adults aged 45 and over and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population.

The rate of deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among adults aged 45 and over declined 5.7% between 1999 and 2009, from 123.9 to 116.8 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) and varied by sex. For example, in 2009, males aged 45 and over had 138.1 COPD deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted), almost one and a half times the COPD death rate among females aged 45 and over, 103.4 per 100,000.

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