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Arthritis, Osteoporosis, and Chronic Back Conditions

Weight reduction counseling, adults with arthritis, 2002 and 2009

Increase desired

AOCBC-7.1 bar graph

Objective AOCBC-7.1

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of overweight or obese adults aged 18 and over with doctor-diagnosed arthritis who received health care provider counseling for weight reduction. Overweight or obese is defined as body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 25.0. Data are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of overweight or obese adults aged 18 and over with arthritis who received weight reduction counseling from a health care provider increased 20.3% between 2002 and 2009, from 35.0% to 42.1% (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity as well as by sex. For example, in 2009:

  • 52.8% (age adjusted) of overweight or obese Hispanic or Latino adults with arthritis received weight reduction counseling from a health care provider, compared with 39.5% of overweight or obese non-Hispanic white adults with arthritis. When expressed as overweight or obese adults with arthritis who received no health care provider counseling for weight reduction, the proportion for the non-Hispanic white population was almost one and a half times the proportion for the Hispanic or Latino population.
  • 45.6% (age adjusted) of overweight or obese females with arthritis received weight reduction counseling from a health care provider, compared with 37.7% of overweight or obese males with arthritis.

Osteoporosis, adults, 1988–94 and 2005–08

Decrease desired

AOCBC-10 bar graph

Objective AOCBC-10

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 50 and over with osteoporosis, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Osteoporosis is defined as femoral bone mineral density (BMD) value less than 0.64. Respondents were asked to select only one race prior to 1999. For 1999 and later years, respondents were asked to select one or more races. For all years, the categories `white, non-Hispanic’ and `black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Mexican-American origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The prevalence of osteoporosis among adults aged 50 and over declined 51.6% from 1988–94 to 2005–08, from 12.2% to 5.9% (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity as well as by sex. For example, in 2005–08:

  • 4.0% (age adjusted) of non-Hispanic black adults aged 50 and over had osteoporosis, compared with: 5.9% of non-Hispanic white adults aged 50 and over, about one and a half times the prevalence among non-Hispanic black adults; and 7.1% of Mexican American adults aged 50 and over, nearly twice the prevalence among non-Hispanic black adults.
  • 8.9% (age adjusted) of females aged 50 and over had osteoporosis, about four and a half times the prevalence among males aged 50 and over, 2.0%.

Activity limitations due to chronic back conditions, adults, 2011

Decrease desired

AOCBC-12 bar graph

Objective AOCBC-12

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for adults aged 18 and over with limitations in activity due to chronic back or neck problems. Data are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2011, 34.7 per 1,000 adults aged 18 and over (age adjusted) experienced limitations in activity due to chronic back or neck problems. This rate varied by race and ethnicity as well as by family income:

  • 15.7 per 1,000 Asian adults (age adjusted) experienced limitations in activity due to chronic back conditions, compared with:
    • 23.7 per 1,000 Hispanic or Latino adults; about one and a half times the rate for Asian adults.
    • 36.5 per 1,000 non-Hispanic black adults; almost two and a half times the rate for Asian adults.
    • 36.7 per 1,000 non-Hispanic white adults; almost two and a half times the rate for Asian adults.
    • 43.3 per 1,000 American Indian or Alaska Native adults; nearly three times the rate for Asian adults.
    • 92.9 per 1,000 adults of two or more races; nearly six times the rate for Asian adults.
  • Rates increased as family incomes decreased. 15.2 per 1,000 adults (age adjusted) with family incomes at or above 600% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) experienced limitations in activity due to chronic back conditions, compared with:
    • 30.7 per 1,000 adults with family incomes at 200%–399% of the FPL; about twice the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL.
    • 55.2 per 1,000 adults with family incomes at 100%–199% of the FPL; more than three and a half times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL.
    • 78.1 per 1,000 adults with family incomes below the FPL; more than five times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL.

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