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Hearing and Other Sensory or Communication Disorders

Hearing screening, newborns, 2001–2009

Increase desired

ENT-VSL-1.1 through1.3 line graph

Objectives ENT-VSL-1.1 through ENT-VSL-1.3

SOURCES: National Vital Statistics System—Natality (NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS; State-based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Program Network, CDC; and/or specific State data.
NOTES: Data are for proportion of newborns who were screened for hearing loss by no later than age 1 month (obj. ENT-VSL-1.1), had an audiologic evaluation by age 3 months (obj. ENT-VSL-1.2), and were enrolled in appropriate intervention services no later than age 6 months (obj. ENT-VSL-1.3). Due to changes in survey methodology, 2005 and 2006 data are not comparable with other years. The number of births is based on occurrence data from NCHS for years 2005 and 2006. Birth data for 2007–2010 are based on State-reported from vital registration birth data.

The proportions of newborns who were screened for hearing loss by no later than age 1 month, had an audiologic evaluation by age 3 months, and were enrolled in appropriate intervention services no later than age 6 months increased between 2001 and 2009, from 66% to 91%, from 56% to 68%, and from 57% to 60%, respectively.


Office visits for otitis media, children and adolescents, 1997–2007

Decrease desired

ENT-VSL2-line graph

Objective ENT-VSL-2

SOURCES: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), CDC/NCHS; National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for visits to ambulatory care facilities with a diagnosis of otitis media (ICD-9-CM codes 381.0–381.4, 382) among children and adolescents under age 18.

The rate of visits to ambulatory care facilities with a diagnosis of otitis media among children and adolescents under age 18 declined 28.5% between 1997 and 2007, from 344.7 to 246.6 visits per 1,000 population.


Office visits for otitis media, children and adolescents, 1997 and 2007

Decrease desired

ENT-VSL2-bar graph

Objective ENT-VSL-2

SOURCES: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), CDC/NCHS; National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for visits to ambulatory care facilities with a diagnosis of otitis media (ICD-9-CM codes 381.0–381.4, 382) among children and adolescents under age 18. Only one race could be recorded prior to 1999. For 1999 and later years, one or more races were recorded. For all years, the categories white and black include persons for whom only one racial group was recorded.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The rate of visits to ambulatory care facilities with a diagnosis of otitis media among children and adolescents under age 18 declined 28.5% between 1997 and 2007, from 344.7 to 246.6 visits per 1,000 children and adolescents, and varied by race and sex; however, these differences were not statistically significant. For example, in 2007:

  • White children and adolescents under age 18 had 264.8 office visits for otitis media per 1,000 population, compared with 243.4 visits per 1,000 among black children and adolescents.
  • Males under age 18 had 261.8 office visits for otitis media per 1,000 population, compared with 230.8 visits per 1,000 among females under aged 18.

Office visits for otitis media, children and adolescents, 1997 and 2007

Decrease desired

ENT-VSL2-bar age graph

Objective ENT-VSL-2

SOURCES: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), CDC/NCHS; National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for visits to ambulatory care facilities with a diagnosis of otitis media (ICD-9-CM codes 381.0–381.4, 382) among children and adolescents under age 18.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The rate of visits to ambulatory care facilities with a diagnosis of otitis media among children and adolescents under age 18 years varied by age. For example, in 2007, children under age 3 years had 723.8 office visits for otitis media per 1,000 population, compared with 315.9 per 1,000 among children aged 3–5 years and 107.2 per 1,000 among children and adolescents aged 6–17 years.


Use of hearing aids, adults with hearing loss, 2001–2007

Increase desired

ENT-VSL-3.1 and 3.3 line graph

Objectives ENT-VSL-3.1 and ENT-VSL-3.3

SOURCES: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS; National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for adults aged 20–69 (objective ENT-VSL-3.1) and adults aged 70 and over (objective ENT-VSL-3.3) with hearing impairments who had ever used a hearing aid or assistive listening devices. Rates for adults aged 20–69 are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population.

The use of hearing aids among adults aged 20–69 with hearing impairments decreased slightly between 2001 and 2006, from 165.9 to 162.7 per 1,000 (age adjusted). The use of hearing aids among adults aged 70 and over with hearing impairments increased between 2001 and 2007, from 255.2 to 289.1 per 1,000. However, these changes were not statistically significant.


Hearing exam in past 5 years, adults, 2003–04

Increase desired

ENT-VSL-4.1 and 4.2 age graph

Objectives ENT-VSL-4.1 and ENT-VSL-4.2

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for adults aged 20–69 (objective ENT-VSL-4.1) and 70 and over (objective ENT-VSL-4.2) who had had a hearing exam within the past 5 years.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of adults who had a hearing exam within the past 5 years varied by age. In 2003–04, 46.8% of adults aged 80 and over had a hearing exam within the past 5 years, compared with 34.1% of adults aged 70–79, 26.3% of adults aged 60–69, 30.0% of adults aged 40–59, and 27.9% of adults aged 20–39.


Hearing exam in past 5 years, adults, 2003–04

Increase desired

ENT-VSL-4.1 and 4.2 bar graph

Objectives ENT-VSL-4.1 and ENT-VSL-4.2

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for adults aged 20–69 (objective ENT-VSL-4.1) and 70 and over (objective ENT-VSL-4.2) who had had a hearing exam within the past 5 years. Data for adults aged 20–69 are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2003–04, 38.5% of adults aged 70 and over and 28.6% (age adjusted) of adults aged 20–69 had a hearing exam within the past 5 years. Rates varied by sex. For example, 36.5% (age adjusted) of males aged 20–69 had a hearing exam within the past 5 years, compared with 20.9% of females aged 20–69.


Noise-induced hearing loss, adults, 1999–2002 and 2003–04

Decrease desired

ENT-VSL8 bar graph

Objective ENT-VSL-8

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for adults aged 20–69 who had elevated hearing thresholds, or audiometric notches, in high frequencies (3, 4, or 6 kHz) in both ears, signifying noise-induced hearing loss, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The categories white and black include persons for whom only one racial group was recorded. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2003–04, 121.4 per 1,000 adults aged 20–69 (age adjusted) had noise-induced hearing loss, a small increase from 1999–2002; however, this change was not statistically significant. The rate varied by race and ethnicity as well as by sex; however, differences by race and ethnicity were not statistically significant. For example, in 2003–04:

  • 140.9 per 1,000 Mexican American adults aged 20–69 (age adjusted) had noise-induced hearing loss, compared with 133.3 per 1,000 among non-Hispanic white and 85.4 per 1,000 among non-Hispanic black adults aged 20–69.
  • 176.2 per 1,000 males aged 20–69 (age adjusted) had noise-induced hearing loss, compared with 72.5 per 1,000 among females aged 20–69.

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