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Adolescent HealthNew

Wellness checkup in past 12 months, adolescents, 2011

Increase desired

AH-1 graph

Objective AH-1

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of adolescents aged 10–17 years whose parents reported that they received a wellness checkup during the past 12 months (when not sick or injured).
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2011, 74.4% of adolescents aged 10–17 years received a wellness checkup during the past 12 months. This rate varied by health insurance status and family income. For example:

  • 77.6% of adolescents aged 10–17 years with private health insurance received a wellness checkup in the past 12 months, compared with 44.9% of those without health insurance. When expressed as adolescents aged 10–17 years who did not receive a wellness checkup in the past 12 months, the rate for those without health insurance was almost two and a half times the rate for those with private health insurance.
  • 83.3% of adolescents aged 10–17 years whose family incomes were at or above 600% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) received a wellness checkup in the past 12 months, compared with 69.7% of those below the FPL. When expressed as adolescents aged 10–17 years who did not receive a wellness checkup in the past 12 months, the rate for those below the FPL was over one and a half times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL.

Participation in extracurricular activities, adolescents, 2007

Increase desired

AH-2 graph

Objective AH-2

*Adolescents with special health care needs are identified by parents’ reports that their child has a health problem expected to last at least 12 months and which requires prescription medication, more services than most adolescents, special therapies, or which limits his or her ability to do things most adolescents can do.
SOURCE: National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH), HRSA/MCHB and CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adolescents aged 12–17 years who participated in one or more organized extra-curricular and/or out-of school activities. Activities included sports, clubs or organizations, or other organized events or activities that took place after school or on weekends.
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2007, 82.4% of adolescents aged 12–17 years participated in one or more organized extracurricular and/or out-of-school activities. This rate varied by whether adolescents had special health care needs as well as by family income. For example:

  • 83.6% of adolescents aged 12–17 years without special health care needs participated in organized extracurricular activities, compared with 78.7% of those with special health care needs.
  • The rate of participation in organized extracurricular activities increased as family incomes increased, from 64.7% for adolescents aged 12–17 years whose family incomes were below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) to 93.9% for those at or above 400% of the FPL. When expressed as adolescents aged 12–17 years who did not participate in organized extracurricular activities, the rate for those below the FPL was over five and a half times the rate for those at or above 400% of the FPL.

Eighth grade reading proficiency, adolescents, 2009

Increase desired

AH-5.3.2 Disabilities graph

Objective AH-5.3.2

*Students with disabilities are classified by their school as having a disability and may need specialized instruction to meet their learning goals. They usually have an Individual Education Plan or a 504 plan. Data on students with disabilities cannot be generalized to the total population of disabled students as some students with disabilities are not able to participate in NAEP testing even with provided accommodations.
†Students are eligible for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP; free or reduced-priced lunch) if their family income is at or below 185 percent of the Federal poverty level.
SOURCE: National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), Department of Education/NCES.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of eighth graders attending public or private schools who scored at the proficiency level or higher for their grade level in the reading skills test administered by the NAEP.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2009, 32.4% of 8th graders scored at the proficiency level or higher for their grade level in the reading skills test administered by the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP). Reading proficiency rates among 8th graders varied by their disability status, family incomes, and parents’ education.

  • 8.4% of 8th graders with disabilities scored at the reading proficiency level or higher for their grade, compared with 34.8% of those without disabilities. However, data on reading proficiency among students with disabilities was limited because of the inability of some students with disabilities to participate in NAEP testing, even with provided accommodations.
  • Students whose family incomes were at or below 185% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) were eligible for a free or reduced-priced lunch under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). 16.1% of NSLP-eligible 8th graders scored at the reading proficiency level or higher for their grade, compared with 42.0% of NSLP-ineligible 8th graders.
  • Reading proficiency rates among 8th graders increased as their parents’ educational attainment increased. 13.8% of 8th graders whose parents had less than a high school education scored at the reading proficiency level or higher for their grade, compared with 43.9% of those whose parents had a four-year college degree.

Eighth grade reading proficiency, adolescents, 2009

Increase desired

AH-5.3.2 Gender and education graph

Objective AH-5.3.2

SOURCE: National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), Department of Education/NCES.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of eighth graders attending public or private schools who scored at the proficiency level or higher for their grade level in the reading skills test administered by the NAEP.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2009, 32.4% of 8th graders scored at the proficiency level or higher for their grade level in the reading skills test administered by the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP). Reading proficiency rates among 8th graders varied by sex and whether they were attending public, charter, or private school.

  • 27.5% of male 8th graders scored at the reading proficiency level or higher for their grade, compared with 37.3% of female 8th graders.
  • 30.4% of 8th graders who were attending public school scored at the reading proficiency level or higher for their grade, compared with 52.4% of those who were attending private school.
  • 26.1% of 8th graders who were attending a charter public school scored at the reading proficiency level or higher for their grade, compared with 32.5% of those who were attending a non-charter public school.

School breakfast program, schools, 2006

Increase desired

AH-6 graph

Objective AH-6

SOURCE: School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS), CDC/NCCDPHP.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of public and private elementary, middle, and high schools that offered breakfast to students.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2006, 68.6% of public and private elementary, middle, and high schools offered breakfast to students. This rate varied by school type and size. 86.3% of public schools had a breakfast program, compared with 20.9% of private/parochial schools. 94.3% of schools with 1,000 students or more had a breakfast program, compared with 52.7% of schools with less than 300 students.

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