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Health Communication and Health Information Technology

Communication with health care providers—understanding, adults, 2007 and 2010

Increase desired

HCHIT-2.2 race graph

Objective HC/HIT-2.2

SOURCE: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always explained things so they could understand them. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always explained things so they could understand them increased 1.0% between 2007 and 2010, from 60.0% to 60.6%; however this change was not statistically significant. The proportion varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2010, 66.5% of non-Hispanic black adults aged 18 and over reported that their health care providers always explained things so they could understand them, compared with 60.9% of non-Hispanic white adults, 58.6% of Asian adults, 55.4% of Hispanic or Latino adults, and 50.6% of American Indian or Alaska Native adults.


Communication with health care providers—understanding, adults, 2007 and 2010

Increase desired

HCHIT-2.2 gender and insurance graph

Objective HC/HIT-2.2

SOURCE: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always explained things so they could understand them. Data by health insurance status are for adults aged 18–64.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always explained things so they could understand them increased 1.0% between 2007 and 2010, from 60.0% to 60.6%; however this change was not statistically significant. The proportion varied by health insurance status. For example, in 2010, 63.9% of adults aged 18 and over with private health insurance reported that their health care providers always explained things so they could understand them, compared with 52% of adults with public health insurance and 51.9% of adults without health insurance.


Communication with health care providers—decision making, adults, 2007 and 2012

Increase desired

HCHIT-3 race and gender graph

Objective HC/HIT-3

SOURCE: Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), NIH/NCI.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always involved them in decisions about their health care as much as they wanted. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always involved them in decisions about their health care as much as they wanted increased 1.2% between 2007 and 2012, from 51.6% to 52.2%; however this change was not statistically significant. The proportion varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2012, 55.3% of Hispanic or Latino adults aged 18 and over reported that their health care providers always involved them in decisions about their health care as much as they wanted, compared with 35.3% of Asian adults.


Communication with health care providers—decision making, adults, 2007 and 2012

Increase desired

HCHIT-3 education graph

Objective HC/HIT-3

SOURCE: Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), NIH/NCI.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always involved them in decisions about their health care as much as they wanted. Data by education are for persons aged 25 and over.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported that their health care providers always involved them in decisions about their health care as much as they wanted increased 1.2% between 2007 and 2012, from 51.6% to 52.2%; however this change was not statistically significant. The proportion varied by education; however, these differences were not statistically significant. For example, in 2012, 52.9% of adults aged 25 and over with some college education or an Associate degree reported that their health care providers always involved them in decisions about their health care as much as they wanted, compared with 50.8% of those with less than a high school education and 48.0% of those with a four-year college degree.


Broadband access to the Internet, adults, 2012

Increase desired

HCHIT-6.2 race and gender graph
HCHIT-6.2 income and area graph

Objective HC/HIT-6.2

SOURCE: Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), NIH/NCI.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who reported having broadband access to the Internet. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2012, 75.6% of adults aged 18 and over reported having broadband access to the Internet. This rate varied by family income. For example, 81.6% of adults aged 18 and over whose family incomes were $75,000 and above reported having broadband access to the Internet, compared with 69.9% of those below $20,000.


Use of electronic health records, medical practices, 2007–2010

Increase desired

HCHIT-10 graph

Objective HC/HIT-10

SOURCE: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of medical practices that used electronic health records and are based on a sample of visits to non-federal employed office-based physicians who were primarily engaged in direct patient care.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The proportion of medical practices primarily engaged in direct patient care that use electronic health records increased 50.4% between 2007 and 2010, from 25.0% to 37.6%.

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