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Family Planning

Intended pregnancies, 2002 and 2006

Increase desired

FP-1 race and income graph

Objective FP-1

SOURCE: Finer L, Zohna M (2011). “Unintended Pregnancy in the United States: Incidence and Disparities, 2006.” Contraception 84: 478–485.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of pregnancies among females aged 15–44 that were intended. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The categories ‘white, non-Hispanic’ and ‘black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.

The proportion of pregnancies among females aged 15–44 that were intended decreased 1.9% between 2002 and 2006, from 52% to 51%; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of this change. The proportion of pregnancies that were intended varied by race and ethnicity as well as by family income; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of differences in proportions. For example, in 2006:

  • 60% of pregnancies among non-Hispanic white females aged 15–44 had been intended, compared with 47% among Hispanic or Latino and 33% among non-Hispanic black females aged 15–44.
  • 66% of pregnancies among females aged 15–44 whose family incomes were at or above 200% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) had been intended, compared with 43% among those at 100–199% of the FPL and 38% among those below the FPL.

Intended pregnancies, 2002 and 2006

Increase desired

FP-1 education and marital graph

Objective FP-1

SOURCE: Finer L, Zohna M (2011). “Unintended Pregnancy in the United States: Incidence and Disparities, 2006.” Contraception 84: 478–485.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of pregnancies among females aged 15–44 that were intended. Data by education are for females aged 20–44. Formerly married is defined as divorced, widowed, or separated.

The proportion of pregnancies among females aged 15–44 that were intended decreased 1.9% between 2002 and 2006, from 52% to 51%; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of this change. The proportion of pregnancies that were intended varied by education as well as by marital status; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of differences in proportions. For example, in 2006:

  • 74% of pregnancies among females aged 20–44 who were college graduates had been intended, compared with 52% among those who were high school graduates and 48% among those with less than a high school education or those with some college education or an Associate degree.
  • 72% of pregnancies among females aged 15–44 who were currently married had been intended, compared with 39% among those who were cohabiting, 32% among those who were formerly married (i.e., divorced, widowed, or separated) and were not cohabiting, and 19% among those who were never married and were not cohabiting.

Receipt of reproductive health services in past 12 months, females, 2006–10

Increase desired

FP-7.1 race and income graph

Objective FP-7.1 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of sexually active females aged 15–44 who received reproductive health services in the past 12 months. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The categories ‘white, non-Hispanic’ and ‘black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2006–10, 78.6% of sexually active females aged 15–44 received reproductive health services in the past 12 months. This rate varied by race and ethnicity as well as by family income:

  • 83.8% of sexually active non-Hispanic black females aged 15–44 received reproductive health services in the past 12 months, compared with 79.8% of sexually active non-Hispanic white and 72.1% of sexually active Hispanic or Latino females aged 15–44.
  • 89.4% of sexually active females aged 15–44 whose family incomes were at 400%–499% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) received reproductive health services in the past 12 months, compared with 78.0% of those at 200%–399% of the FPL, and 76.3% of those below the FPL.

Receipt of reproductive health services in past 12 months, females, 2006–10

Increase desired

FP-7.1 education and insurance graph

Objective FP-7.1 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of sexually active females aged 15–44 who received reproductive health services in the past 12 months. Data by education are for females aged 20–44.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2006–10, 78.6% of sexually active females aged 15–44 received reproductive health services in the past 12 months. This rate varied by education as well as by health insurance status:

  • 85.2% of sexually active females aged 20–44 with an advanced degree received reproductive health services in the past 12 months, compared with 72.0% of those with a high school education and 66.5% of those with less than a high school education.
  • 82.3% of sexually active females aged 15–44 with health insurance received reproductive health services in the past 12 months, compared with 64.6% of those without health insurance.

Pregnancies, adolescent females, 2005 and 2008

Decrease desired

FP-8.1 vertical bar graph

Objective FP-8.1

SOURCES: Abortion Surveillance Data, CDC/NCCDPHP; National Vital Statistics System—Natality (NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), CDC/NCHS; Abortion Provider Survey, Guttmacher Institute.
NOTE: Data are for the number of pregnancies per 1,000 females aged 15–17 years.

The rate of pregnancies among adolescent females aged 15–17 years decreased 1.7% between 2005 and 2008, from 40.2 to 39.5 per 1,000; however, data were unavailable to assess statistical significance of this change.

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