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Access to Health Services

Find evidence-based information and recommendations related to Access to Health Services.

RatingResourceYearEvidence Type
Access to Health Services
Increasing Cancer Screening: Reducing Client Out-of-Pocket Costs—Updated recommendations for client- and provider-oriented interventions to increase breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening. (Community Guide Recommendation)
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2012 Systematic Review
Access to Health Services
Nurse Staffing and Quality of Patient Care
AHRQ
2007 Systematic Review
Access to Health Services
Recommendations to enhance Diabetes prevention and Improve Glycemic Control Through Case Management—Recommendations for healthcare system and self-management education interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality from diabetes. (Community Guide Recommendation)
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2002 Systematic Review
Access to Health Services
Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative (PSPC)
HRSA
2012 Non-Systematic Review, Expert Opinion
Access to Health Services
Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations
IOM
2011 Non-Systematic Review
Access to Health Services
Using Workforce Practices to Drive Quality Improvement: A Guide for Hospitals
AHRQ
2010 Non-Systematic Review
Access to Health Services
Characterizing Waiting Room Time, Treatment Time, and Boarding Time in the Emergency Department Using Quantile Regression
Academic Emergency Medicine
2010 Cohort Study
 

The Healthy People 2020 evidence-based resources identified have been selected by subject matter experts at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources. Each of the selected evidence-based resources has been rated and classified according to a set of selection criteria based, in part, on publication status, publication type, and number of studies. This classification scheme does not necessarily consider all dimensions of quality, such as statistical significance, effect size (e.g., magnitude of effect), meaningfulness of effect, additional effect over control, and study design (e.g., sample size, power, internal validity, external validity, generalizability, potential biases, potential confounders).

 

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Consumer Information

The following consumer resources are from healthfinder.gov.

Get Screened

Screenings are medical tests that check for diseases. Find out which screenings you need.

Men: Take Charge of Your Health

You can lower your risk of serious health problems by making small changes.

Take Charge of Your Health Care

Play an active role in your health care. Speak up and ask questions when you are at the doctor's office.

Protect Your Health as You Grow Older

Staying active and eating healthy foods can help you live longer and better.

Make the Most of Your Baby's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 0 to 11 months)

Babies need to go to the doctor for a “well-baby visit” 6 times during their first year. Prepare for your baby's next visit by making a list of questions to ask the doctor.

Make the Most of Your Child's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 1 to 4)

Children ages 1 to 4 need to go to the doctor for a “well-child visit” a total of 7 times. Get the most out of your child's next visit by gathering important information to share with the doctor.

Make the Most of Your Child's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 5 to 10 years)

Children ages 5 to 10 need to go to the doctor for a “well-child visit” once a year. Get the most out of your child's next visit by making a list of questions to take to the doctor.

Make the Most of Your Child's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 11 to 14 years)

Children ages 11 to 14 need to go to the doctor for a “well-child visit” once a year. Get the most out of your child's next visit by gathering important information to share with the doctor.

Make the Most of Your Teen's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 15 to 17 years)

Teens ages 15 to 17 need to go to the doctor for a “well-child visit” once a year. Encourage your teen to get involved in doctors' visits.

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