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PA-9.1 Data Details

PA-9.1 Increase the number of States with licensing regulations for physical activity in child care that require activity programs providing large muscle or gross motor activity, development, and/or equipment

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
number 
Baseline (Year)
25 (2006)
Target
35
Target-Setting Method
Maintain consistency with national programs, regulations, policies, and laws.
Numerator
Number of states that require activity programs providing large muscle or gross motor activity, development and/or equipment in child care centers, large family homes, and small family homes.
Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

Kaphingst and Story (2009) reported the regulations of all 50 U.S. states as they relate to physical activity promotion for activity programs providing large muscle or gross motor activity, development and/or equipment in child care centers, large family homes, and small family homes. The objective was based on guidelines set forth by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. The initial assessment of physical activity policies was conducted in 2006. Findings varied by setting (i.e. child care center, small family child care home, large family or group child care home). The requirements assessed included, activity programs engaging large muscle groups (19-39 states), daily outdoor activity time (24-36 states), quantified physical activity time requirements (2 states), and physical activity intensity requirements (2-10 states). These data can be used as a benchmark to assess physical activity policies enacted at the state level.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Kaphingst K and Story M. (2009). Child care as an untapped setting for obesity prevention: state child care licensing regulations related to nutrition, physical activity, and media use for preschool-aged children in the United States. Prev Chronic Dis, 6(1). http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2009/jan/07_0240.htm
    http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2009/jan/07_0240.htm
  2. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. (2009). Active Start: A Statement of Physical Activity Guidelines for Children From Birth to Age 5 (2nd Ed.). National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Reston, VA.
  3. State Licensing and Regulation Information. The National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC). http://nrckids.org/STATES/states.htm
    http://nrckids.org/STATES/states.htm
  4. The National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC) http://nrckids.org
    http://nrckids.org