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IID-24 Data Details

IID-24 Reduce chronic hepatitis B virus infections in infants and young children (perinatal infections)

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Vital Statistics System-Natality (NVSS-N); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/NCHS)
Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program (PHBPP); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (CDC/NCHHSTP)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
number 
Baseline (Year)
799 (2007)
Target
400
Target-Setting Method
Maintain consistency with national programs, regulations, policies, and laws.
Numerator
Number of estimated chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections occurring among infants and children aged 1-24 months of HBV-infected mothers
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

The estimated number of births to HBV-infected mothers is derived by applying race- and ethnicity- specific estimates of the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen to NVSS-N annual natality data.

Using data collected by the Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program and NVSS-N, this measure is based on the following estimation procedure:

Multiply the total births per year to HBsAg- positive women by the proportion of pregnant women screened for HBsAg and then by the proportion of infants born to identified HBsAg- positive women who receive the vaccine (this estimates the number of infants who were born to identified HBsAg-positive women and received at least one dose of vaccine). Multiply the total number of infants who were born to HBsAg-positive women and received at least one dose of vaccine by the proportion of vaccinated infants who will remain susceptible, and add to the number of infants born to HBsAg-positive women who are not vaccinated (this estimates the number of infants born to HBsAg-positive women who remain susceptible). Finally, multiply number of infants born to HBsAg- positive women remaining susceptible by the proportion of susceptible infants who will become infected and then by the proportion of infected infants who will remain chronically infected with HBV.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. CDC. Hepatitis Surveillance Report (56). 1995.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Case definitions for infectious conditions under public health surveillance. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 46 (RR-10), 1997. (Updated case definitions can be found at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncphi/disss/nndss/casedef/introduction.htm).
  3. Margolis, H.S.; Alter, M.J.; Hadler, S.C. Hepatitis B: Evolving epidemiology and implications for control. Seminars in Liver Disease 11(2): 84-92, 199