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ENT-VSL-9.1 Data Details

ENT-VSL-9.1 Increase the proportion of adults bothered by tinnitus in the past 12 months who have seen a doctor

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/NCHS)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
Baseline (Year)
44.5 (2007)
Target
48.9
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Number of persons aged 18 years and over who have been bothered with tinnitus (ringing, roaring, or buzzing in the ears or head that lasts for 5 or more minutes) in the past 12 months and who have discussed their tinnitus problem with their doctor or other health care professional
Denominator
Number of persons aged 18 years and over who have been bothered with tinnitus (ringing, roaring, or buzzing in the ears or head that lasts for 5 or more minutes)  in the past 12 months
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2007 Nationial Health Interview Survey, Hearing Supplement:

[NUMERATOR AND DENOMINATOR:]

IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS, have you been bothered by ringing, roaring, or buzzing in your ears or head that lasts for 5 minutes or more? [Read if necessary:] Tinnitus (TIN-uh-tus) is the medical term for ringing, roaring or buzzing in the ears or head.

  1. Yes
  2. No

[NUMERATOR:]

Have you ever discussed this ringing, roaring or buzzing in your ears or head with your doctor or other health care professional?

  1. Yes
  2. No
Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

Each year approximately one in 10 Americans experience some form of tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, that lasts longer than 5 minutes per episode. These tinnitus sounds are perceived to originate in the ears or head; they are subjective experiences that cannot be heard by others standing nearby and are not objectively measurable with devices.

The mechanisms that produce subjective tinnitus are not well understood. Typically, causes of hearing loss also cause tinnitus, including noise exposure, aging, trauma (head or neck injury), and medications. People react very differently to tinnitus and their reactions over months and years will probably change, some are able to habituate to their tinnitus successfully. They may find it a little bothersome, but largely ignore it. Others are distressed by tinnitus and have difficulty concentrating and getting to sleep. Importantly, tinnitus can be a symptom of a serious illness, which is why tinnitus should be discussed with a doctor or other health care professional.

Age Adjustment

This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

  • Total: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Sex: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Race/Ethnicity: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Educational Attainment: 25-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Family Income: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Family Type: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Country of Birth: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Disability Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Geographic Location: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+
  • Health Insurance Status: 18-44, 45-64
  • Marital Status: 18-44, 45-64, 65-74, 75+

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Ciocon JO, Amede R, Lechtenberg C, Aster F. 1995. Tinnitus: a stepwise workup to quiet the noise within. Geriatrics. 50: 18–25.
  2. Crummer RW, Hassan GA. Diagnostic approach to tinnitus. 2004. Am Fam Physician. 69: 120–126.
  3. Degive C, Kos M-I. 2006. Joint medico-psychological consultation for patients suffering from tinnitus. ORL. 68: 38–42.