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Reproductive and Sexual Health

Latest Data

Explore the latest data for the LHI topic Reproductive and Sexual Health.
 

Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

Between 2006–2010 and 2011–2013, there was no statistically significant change in the percentage of sexually active females aged 15–44 years who received reproductive health services in the past 12 months (78.6% in 2006–2010 and 77.3% in 2011–2013). In 2011–2013, several groups of women had the highest rate of receipt of reproductive health services in their specific demographic categories, including black non-Hispanic females, those aged 18–24 years, those with the highest family income, those aged 20–44 years with a bachelor’s degree, and those with private health insurance.  

From 2006 to 2012, the estimated number of persons aged 13 years and over living with HIV increased by 16.5%, from 1,045,800 to 1,218,400. During the same period, the proportion of people living with HIV who were aware of their HIV infection increased by 7.8%, from 80.9% to 87.2%. 

Leading Health Indicators

Explore the trends and disparities for each indicator.
Awareness of HIV infection status (HIV-13)
Increase the proportion of sexually experienced females aged 15 to 44 years who received reproductive health services in the past 12 months (FP-7.1)

Sexually active females who received reproductive health services (FP-7.1)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective FP-7.1 tracks the proportion of sexually active females aged 15–44 years who received reproductive health services in the past 12 months.
    • HP2020 Baseline: 78.6% of sexually active females aged 15–44 years received reproductive health services in the past 12 months, as reported in 2006–2010.
    • HP2020 Target: 86.5%, a 10% improvement over the baseline.
    • Among racial/ethnic groups, sexually active black non-Hispanic women had the best (highest) rate of receipt of reproductive health services in the past 12 months, 84.8%, as reported in 2011–2013, whereas white non-Hispanic and Hispanic or Latino women had rates of 76.1% and 77.5%, respectively.   
    • Females (sexually active) aged 18–24 years had a higher (better) level of receipt of reproductive health services than females aged 15–17 years and females aged 25–44 years (85.1% versus 71.9% and 75.2%, respectively, as reported in 2011–2013). The rate for females aged 18–24 years was 18.4% higher than that for females aged 15–17 years and 13.2% higher than that for females aged 25–44 years.
    • Females (sexually active) whose family income was at or above 500% of the poverty threshold had the highest (best) rate of receipt of reproductive health services, 81.3%, as reported in 2011–2013, whereas females with family income less than 100% of the poverty threshold had the lowest rate of receipt of services, 73.5%.
    • Females (sexually active) aged 20–44 years with a 4-year college degree had the highest (best) rate of receipt of reproductive health services (81.2% as reported in 2011–2013). Rates for women in other education groups were:
    • 69.8% for those with less than a high school education. The rate for females with a 4-year college degree was 16.3% higher than that for females with less than a high school education.
      • 67.4% for those with a high school education or GED. The rate for females with a 4-year college degree was 20.5% higher than that for females with a high school education or GED.
      • 75.9% for those with some college education; not significantly different than the best group rate.  
      • 80.6% for those with an associate’s degree; not significantly different than the best group rate.
      • 79.3% for those with an advanced degree; not significantly different than the best group rate.
    Sexually Active Females Receiving Reproductive Health Services by Educational Attainment,
    2011–2013

    Reproductive and Sexual Health Services Web Graphic

    Data source: National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), CDC/NCHS.

    • Females (sexually active) with private health insurance had the highest (best) rate of receipt of reproductive health services (81.9% as reported in 2011–2013). Rates for women in other health insurance groups were:
      • 61.8% for those with no health insurance. The rate for females with private health insurance was almost 1.5 times that for females without insurance. 
      • 80.2% for those with public health insurance; not significantly different than the best group rate.

    Endnotes

    • Unless otherwise stated, all comparisons described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance.
    • Data for this objective are available periodically and come from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), CDC/NCHS.
    • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.  

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    Awareness of HIV infection status (HIV-13)

    • Healthy People 2020 objective HIV-13 tracks the proportion of persons aged 13 years and over living with HIV who are aware of their HIV infection.
      • HP2020 Baseline: 80.9% of persons aged 13 years and over living with HIV were aware of their HIV infection in 2006. 
      • HP2020 Target: 90.0%, consistent with the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.
    • Females had a higher rate of awareness of their HIV infection than males in 2012 (88.6% versus 86.7%).
    • White persons with HIV had the highest (best) rate of awareness of HIV infection (89.8%) in 2012. This rate was 16.8% higher than the lowest group rate, which was among Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) persons with HIV (76.9%). The rates for other race/ethnic groups were:
      • 79.4% among Asian persons. The rate for white persons was 13.1% higher than that for Asian persons.  
      • 81.1% among American Indian and Alaska Native persons
      • 86.3% among black persons
      • 85.3% among Hispanic or Latino persons
      • 87.7% among persons of 2 or more races
    • Persons aged 65 years and over with HIV had the highest (best) rate of HIV infection awareness (96.7%) in 2012. This rate was more than 1.5 times the lowest group rate, which was among persons aged 13–24 years (55.8%). The rates for other age groups were:
      • 73.7% among persons aged 25–34 years. The rate for persons aged 65 years and over was almost 1.5 times the rate for persons aged 25–34 years.  
      • 86.8% among persons aged 35–44 years 
      • 92.1% among persons aged 45–54 years 
      • 94.0% among persons aged 55–64 years

    Awareness of HIV Infection Status by Sex, 2012

    Awareness of HIV Infection Graphic

    Data source: HIV Surveillance System, CDC/NCHHSTP.

    • Persons whose transmission category was identified as “other” (persons who had hemophilia, a blood transfusion, or perinatal exposure, or whose risk factor was not reported or not identified) had the highest (best) rate of awareness of their HIV infection (96.2%). The rates for other transmission groups were:
      • 83.6% among men having heterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection. The rate for persons whose transmission category was identified as “other” was 15.1% higher than that for heterosexual males.  
      • 85.2% among men having sex with men. The rate for persons whose transmission category was identified as “other” was 12.9% higher than that for men who have sex with men.  
      • 86.7% among women having heterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection 
      • 93.6% among men having sex with men who use intravenous drugs
      • 94.0% among female intravenous drug users 
      • 95.0% among male intravenous drug users
    Endnotes:
    • Data for this measure are available annually and come from the HIV Surveillance System, CDC/NCHHSTP. Data in the HIV Surveillance System, formerly the HIV/AIDS Surveillance System, are continually updated, and new records are added as they are reported. For this reason, data for any given year may be revised, and data points are updated annually.

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