You are here

Access to Health Services

Latest Data

Explore the latest data for the LHI topic Access to Health Services.
Download the latest Access to Health Services data in spreadsheet format [XLSX - 34KB]

Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

Over the past decade, the rate of persons aged less than 65 years with health insurance has decreased slightly, from 83.5% in 2003 to 83.3% in 2013; this change was not statistically significant. The proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider also decreased, moving from 77.5% in 2001 to 77.3% in 2011; this change was also not statistically significant. Differences in rates of health insurance exist by race and ethnicity, level of educational attainment, and in the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider by race and ethnicity, level of educational attainment, and type of insurance.

Leading Health Indicators

Explore the latest data and disparities for each indicator.

Health Insurance (AHS-1.1)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective AHS-1.1 tracks the proportion of persons aged less than 65 years with health (medical) insurance.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2008, 83.2% of persons aged less than 65 years had health insurance.  
    • HP2020 Target: 100%, or total coverage. 
  • Over the past decade, the rate of persons with health insurance decreased slightly, moving from 83.5% in 2003 to 83.3% in 2013; this change was not statistically significant.
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander population aged less than 65 years had the highest rate of health insurance coverage, 89.3% in 2013, whereas the Hispanic or Latino population and the American Indian or Alaska Native population had the lowest rates (69.3% and 70.6%, respectively).
    • The rate for the Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander population was nearly 1.5 times the rate for the Hispanic or Latino population and the American Indian or Alaska Native population.

Persons With Health Insurance by Educational Attainment, 2013AHS Web Graphic

Data source: National Health Interview Survey (NCHS), CDC/NCHS
 
  • Females aged less than 65 years had a higher rate of health insurance coverage (84.8%) compared to males (81.9%) in 2013.
  • Those aged 25–64 years with an advanced degree had the highest rate of health insurance coverage, 94.6% in 2013, among education groups, whereas those without a high school education had the lowest rate, 56.7% in 2013. The rate for those with an advanced degree was more than 1.5 times rate for persons without a high school education.
  • Among income groups, the highest income population (those with family incomes of more than 600% of the poverty threshold) had the highest rate of health insurance coverage, 96.7% in 2013, whereas the near-poor population (those with family incomes between 100% and 199% of the poverty threshold) had the lowest rate, 70.7% in 2013. The rate for those in the highest income bracket was nearly 1.5 times the rate for the near poor. 
  • Persons aged less than 18 years had the highest rate of health insurance, 93.4% in 2013, among broad age groups. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 75.4% among persons aged 18–44 years (lowest rate)
    • 84.6% among persons aged 45–64 years 
    • The rate for persons aged less than 18 years was 23% higher than the rate for the 18–44 year olds.
  • When further refining the age groups, children aged less than 5 years had the highest rate of health insurance, 95.2% in 2013. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 94.0% among persons aged 5–11 years 
    • 91.1% among persons aged 12–17 years 
    • 75.4% among persons aged 18–24 years (lowest rate)
    • 75.9% among persons aged 25–44 years 
    • 82.9% among persons aged 45–54 years 
    • 86.5% among persons aged 55–64 years 
    • The rate for children aged less than 5 years was nearly 1.5 times the rate for persons aged 18–24 years.
  • Persons aged less than 65 years born in the U.S. had a higher rate of health insurance coverage (86.5%) compared to those born outside the U.S. (65.1%) in 2013. The rate for the U.S.-born population was almost 1.5 times the rate for the population born outside the U.S.
 
ENDNOTES:
  • All disparities described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance.
  • Data for this measure are available annually and come from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.  
 

Usual Primary Care Provider (AHS-3)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective AHS-3 tracks the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2007, 76.3% of persons had a usual primary care provider.  
    • HP2020 Target: 83.9%, or a 10% improvement over the baseline.
  • Over the past decade, the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider also decreased slightly, moving from 77.5% in 2001 to 77.3% in 2011; this change was not statistically significant.

Persons With a Usual Primary Care Provider by Health Insurance Status, 2011

AHS Web Graphic

Data source: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ. 

  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the 2 or more races population had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 83.9% in 2011, whereas the Hispanic or Latino population had the lowest rate, 68.7% in 2011. 
  • Females had a higher proportion of persons with usual primary care provider coverage (80.1%) compared to males (74.3%) in 2011.
  • Among education groups, those aged 25 years and over with an advanced degree had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 80.5% in 2011, whereas those without a high school education had the lowest rate, 70.1% in 2011. 
  • Among income groups, the highest income population (those with family incomes of more than 600% of the poverty threshold) had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 84.0% in 2011, whereas those with family incomes below the poverty threshold had the lowest proportion, 71.8% in 2011. 
  • Persons aged 65 years and over had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 90.2%, among age groups in 2011. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 89.8% among persons aged less than 18 years 
    • 61.8% among persons aged 18–44 years (lowest rate)
    • 80.4% among persons aged 45–64 years
    • The rate for persons aged 65 years and over was about 1.5 times the rate for persons aged 18–44 years.
  • When further refining the age groups, children aged less than 5 years had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider, 93.1% in 2011. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 90.2% among persons aged 5–11 years 
    • 86.6% among persons aged 12–17 years 
    • 58.9% among persons aged 18–24 years (lowest rate)
    • 62.8% among persons aged 25–44 years 
    • 76.8% among persons aged 45–54 years 
    • 84.7% among persons aged 55–64 years 
    • 90.3% among persons aged 65–74 years 
    • 90.8% among persons aged 75–84 years 
    • 88.4% among persons aged 85 years and over
  • The rate for children aged less than 5 years was more than 1.5 times the rate for persons aged 18–24 years.
  • Persons born in the U.S. had a higher proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider (79.6%) compared to those born outside the U.S. (62.2%) in 2011. The rate for the population born in the U.S. was almost 1.5 times that for the population born outside the U.S.
  • Among insurance groups for persons aged less than 65 years, those with public insurance only had the highest proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider (81.9%), whereas the uninsured had the lowest rate (42.1%) in 2011. The rate for the population with public insurance only was nearly 2 times that for the uninsured population.
 
ENDNOTES:
  • All disparities described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance.  
  • Data for this measure are available annually and come from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ. 
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.