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Tobacco Use

Cigarette smoking, adults, 1965–2011

Decrease desired

TU-1.1 graph

Objective TU-1.1 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over who were current smokers (smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and reported currently smoking every day or on some days), and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Data prior to 1997 are not strictly comparable with data for later years due to the 1997 questionnaire redesign.

The proportion of adults aged 18 and over who were current smokers (smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and reported currently smoking every day or on some days) has continued to decline since 1965. Between 1997 and 2011, the proportion of adults who were current smokers decreased 20.8%, from 24% to 19% (age adjusted).


Tobacco use, adolescents, 1991–2011

Decrease desired

TU-2.1-2.4

Objectives TU-2.1 through TU-2.4 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), CDC/NCCDPHP.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of students in grades 9–12 who used any of the following tobacco products on 1 or more of the 30 days preceding the survey: cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (i.e., chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip), and cigars (including cigarillos or little cigars).

The proportion of students in grades 9–12 who used tobacco products in the past 30 days (including cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products, and cigars) decreased 46.1% between 1997 and 2011, from 43.4% to 23.4%.


Exposure to secondhand smoke, nonsmokers, 2005–08 and 2009–10

Decrease desired

TU-11.1-11.3 graph

Objectives TU-11.1 View Leading Health Indicators through TU-11.3

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of nonsmoker children aged 3–11 years (objective TU-11.1), nonsmoker adolescents aged 12–17 years (objective TU-11.2), and nonsmoker adults aged 18 and over (objective TU-11.3) who were exposed to secondhand smoke, as measured by a serum cotinine level greater than or equal to 0.05 ng/ml but less than or equal to 10 ng/ml. Children aged 3–11 years are considered to be nonsmokers if they have a serum cotinine level less than or equal to 10 ng/ml. Adolescents and adults aged 12 years and over are considered to be nonsmokers if they reported that they did not use any product containing nicotine in the past 5 days and if they have a serum cotinine level less than or equal to 10 ng/ml. Data for adults aged 18 and over are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population.
I = 95% confidence interval.

From 2005–08 to 2009–10, the proportions of nonsmoker children aged 3–11 years and nonsmoker adolescents aged 12–17 years who were exposed to secondhand smoke decreased 19.5% and 20.7%, respectively, from 52.2% to 42.0% and from 45.5% to 36.1%, respectively. Similarly, the proportion of nonsmoker adults aged 18 and over who were exposed to secondhand smoke decreased 24.7% from 2005–08 to 2009–10, from 37.6% to 28.3% (age adjusted).


Comprehensive smoke-free indoor air laws, states and D.C., 1998–2011

Increase desired

TU-13.1, 13.3, 13.4 graph

Objectives TU-13.1, TU-13.3 and TU-13.4

SOURCE: State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation System (STATE), CDC/NCCDPHP.
NOTE: Data are for the number of states and D.C. with comprehensive laws enacted that banned smoking in private workplaces (objective TU-13.1), restaurants (objective TU-13.3), and bars (objective TU-13.4).

Between 2002 and 2011, the number of states and D.C. with comprehensive laws enacted that banned smoking in private workplaces, restaurants, and bars increased 1,500.0% or more, from 2 to 33, from 2 to 32, and from 1 to 27, respectively.


Comprehensive smoke-free indoor air laws, 2011

2020 Target: 51 (50 States and the District of Columbia)

Increase desired

TU-13.1, 13.3, 13.4 map

Objectives TU-13.1, TU-13.3 and TU-13.4

*No law; designated areas; or separate ventilation law.
SOURCE: State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation System (STATE), CDC/NCCDPHP.
NOTE: Data are for states and D.C. with comprehensive laws enacted that banned smoking in 0, 1, 2, or all 3 of the following types of locations: private workplaces (objective TU-13.1), restaurants (objective TU-13.3), and bars (objective TU-13.4).

In 2011, D.C. and all but 15 states had comprehensive laws enacted that banned smoking in at least one of the following types of locations: private workplaces, restaurants, or bars.

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