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Maternal, Infant, and Child Health

Infant deaths, 1997–2007

Decrease desired

MICH 1.3 total graph

Objective MICH-1.3 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Mortality and Natality (NVSS-M, NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data include deaths to infants under age 1 year.

The infant mortality rate decreased 5.6% over the past decade, from 7.2 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1997 to 6.8 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2007.


Infant deaths, 1997–2007

Decrease desired

MICH 1.3 race graph

Objective MICH-1.3 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Mortality and Natality (NVSS-M, NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data include deaths to infants under age 1 year. Prior to 2003 only one race category could be recorded; recording more than one race was not an option. Beginning in 2003 multiple-race data were reported by some states; multiple-race data were bridged to the single-race categories for comparability. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

The infant mortality rate decreased 5.6% between 1997 and 2007, from 7.2 to 6.8 deaths per 1,000 live births and varied by mothers’ race and ethnicity. For example, in 2007, Asian or Pacific Islander mothers experienced 4.8 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, compared with: 13.3 per 1,000 for non-Hispanic black mothers, almost three times the rate for Asian or Pacific Islander mothers; and 9.2 per 1,000 for American Indian or Alaska Native mothers, almost twice the rate for Asian or Pacific Islander mothers.


Preterm births, 1999–2009

Decrease desired

MICH 9.1 total graph

Objective MICH-9.1 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Natality (NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of live births with less than 37 completed weeks of gestation.

Overall, the preterm birth rate (i.e., with less than 37 completed weeks of gestation) increased 3.4% between 1999 and 2009, from 11.8% to 12.2% of live births. However, the change in the preterm birth rate fluctuated during the last decade: between 1999 and 2000, the rate initially decreased, from 11.8% to 11.6%; between 2000 and 2006, the rate increased, from 11.6% to 12.8%, which was a 10.3% increase; and between 2006 and 2009, the rate decreased 4.7%, from 12.8% to 12.2%.


Change in preterm births from 2006 to 2009

Decrease desired

MICH 9.1 map graph

Objective MICH-9.1 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Natality (NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for the percent change between 2006 and 2009 in the proportion of live births with less than 37 completed weeks of gestation.

Most states and D.C. experienced a statistically significant decrease in preterm births between 2006 and 2009. Indeed, only 8 states did not have a statistically significant decrease, 9 states and D.C. had a decrease of 10% or more, and no state had a statistically significant increase during that time period.


Preterm births, 1999–2009

Decrease desired

MICH 9.1 gender graph

Objective MICH-9.1 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Natality (NVSS-N), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of live births with less than 37 completed weeks of gestation.

The preterm birth rate varied by sex. For example, in 2009, 11.7% of female live births were delivered preterm, compared with 12.6% of male live births.

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