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Heart Disease and Stroke

Coronary heart disease deaths, 1999–2009

Decrease desired

HDS-2

Objective HDS-2

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Mortality (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for ICD-10 codes I20-I25 reported as underlying cause of death and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Prior to 2003, only one race could be recorded; recording more than one race was not an option. Beginning in 2003 multiple-race data were reported by some states; multiple-race data were bridged to the single-race categories for comparability. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

The coronary heart disease death rate declined 40.3% between 1999 and 2009, from 194.6 to 116.1 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2009, the Asian or Pacific Islander population had 67.3 deaths per 100,000 (age adjusted) that were due to coronary heart disease, compared with:

  • 86.5 deaths per 100,000 in the Hispanic or Latino population; almost one and a half times the rate for the Asian or Pacific Islander population.
  • 117.7 deaths per 100,000 in the non-Hispanic white population; nearly twice the rate for the Asian or Pacific Islander population.
  • 141.3 deaths per 100,000 in the non-Hispanic black population; more than twice the rate for the Asian or Pacific Islander population.

Stroke deaths, 1999–2009

Decrease desired

HDS-3

Objective HDS-3

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System—Mortality (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for ICD-10 codes I60–I69 reported as underlying cause of death and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Prior to 2003 only one race category could be recorded; recording more than one race was not an option. Beginning in 2003 multiple-race data were reported by some states; multiple-race data were bridged to the single-race categories for comparability. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

The stroke death rate declined 36.9% between 1999 and 2009, from 61.6 to 38.9 deaths per 100,000 (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2009, the American Indian or Alaska Native population had 26.7 deaths per 100,000 (age adjusted) that were due to stroke, compared with: 37.8 deaths per 100,000 in the non-Hispanic white population, almost one and a half times the rate for the American Indian or Alaska Native population; and 55.7 deaths per 100,000 in the non-Hispanic black population, more than twice the rate for the American Indian or Alaska Native population.


Hypertension, adults, 1988–94, 2001–04, and 2005–08

Decrease desired

HDS-5.1

Objective HDS-5.1

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over with hypertension and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Hypertension is defined for adults as an average systolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 140 mm Hg, an average diastolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 90 mm Hg, or self-reported current use of blood pressure lowering medication. Respondents were asked to select only one race prior to 1999. For 1999 and later years, respondents were asked to select one or more races. For all years, the categories `white, non-Hispanic’ and `black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Mexican-American origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The prevalence of hypertension among adults aged 18 and over increased 21.1% from 1988–94 to 2005–08, from 24.7% to 29.9% (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2005–08, 42.0% (age adjusted) of non-Hispanic black adults had hypertension, more than one and a half times the prevalence among Mexican American adults, 25.5%.


High cholesterol, adults, 1988–94, 2001–04, and 2005–08

Decrease desired

HDS-7

Objective HDS-7

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 20 and over with high cholesterol levels and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. High cholesterol level is defined as a total blood cholesterol of 240 mg/dL or greater. Respondents were asked to select only one race prior to 1999. For 1999 and later years, respondents were asked to select one or more races. For all years, the categories `white, non-Hispanic’ and `black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Mexican-American origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The prevalence of high cholesterol among adults aged 20 and over decreased 27.2% from 1988–94 to 2005–08, from 20.6% to 15.0% (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2005–08, 15.5% (age adjusted) of non-Hispanic white and Mexican American adults aged 20 and over had high cholesterol, almost one and a half times the prevalence among non-Hispanic black adults aged 20 and over, 11.8%.


Blood pressure control, adults with hypertension, 1988–94, 2001–04, and 2005–08

Increase desired

HDS-12

Objective HDS-12 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 18 and over with hypertension whose blood pressure was under control, and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Controlled blood pressure among adults with hypertension is defined as an average systolic blood pressure less than 140 mm Hg and an average diastolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg. Respondents were asked to select only one race prior to 1999. For 1999 and later years, respondents were asked to select one or more races. For all years, the categories `white, non-Hispanic’ and `black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Mexican-American origin may be of any race.
I = 95% confidence interval.

The prevalence of blood pressure control among adults aged 18 and over with hypertension increased 76.2% from 1988–94 to 2005–08, from 24.8% to 43.7% (age adjusted), and varied by race and ethnicity as well as by sex. For example, in 2005–08:

  • 46.5% (age adjusted) of non-Hispanic white adults with hypertension had a controlled blood pressure, compared with 31.8% of Mexican American adults with hypertension. When expressed as adults with hypertension whose blood pressure was uncontrolled, the prevalence among the Mexican American population was almost one and a half times the prevalence among the non-Hispanic white population.
  • 52.0% (age adjusted) of female adults with hypertension had a controlled blood pressure, compared with 38.6% of male adults with hypertension. When expressed as adults with hypertension whose blood pressure was uncontrolled, the prevalence among males was almost one and a half times the prevalence among females.

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