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Access to Health Services

Health (medical) insurance, 2001–2011

Increase desired

AHS-1.1 graph

Objective AHS-1.1 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of persons under age 65 with health (medical) insurance. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

The proportion of persons under age 65 who had health (medical) insurance declined 1.0% between 2001 and 2011, from 83.6% to 82.8%, and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2011, 87.1% of the non-Hispanic white population under age 65 had health (medical) insurance, compared with 65.8% of the American Indian or Alaska Native population. When expressed as persons under age 65 who had no health (medical) insurance, the proportion for the American Indian or Alaska Native population was over two and a half times the proportion for the non-Hispanic white population.


Usual primary care provider, 2000–2010

Increase desired

AHS-3 graph

Objective AHS-3 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of persons with a usual primary care provider. Persons were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Data for the Asian population, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander population, and persons identifying with two or more races are not available before 2002.

The proportion of persons who had a usual primary care provider declined 1.8% between 2000 and 2010, from 78.2% to 76.8%, and varied by race and ethnicity. For example, in 2010, 80.7% of the American Indian or Alaska Native population had a usual primary care provider, compared with 67.3% of the Hispanic or Latino population. When expressed as persons who had no usual primary care provider, the proportion for the Hispanic or Latino population was over one and a half times the proportion for the American Indian or Alaska Native population.


Specific source of ongoing care, 2001–2011

Increase desired

AHS-5.1 graph

Objective AHS-5.1

SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), CDC/NCHS.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of persons with a specific source of ongoing care.

The proportion of persons who had a specific source of ongoing care declined 1.4% between 2001 and 2011, from 88.0% to 86.8%, and varied by sex. For example, in 2011, 89.7% of females had a specific source of ongoing care, compared with 83.8% of males. When expressed as persons who had no specific source of ongoing care, the proportion for males was over one and a half times the proportion for females.


Delay or inability to obtain necessary medical care, 2010

Decrease desired

AHS-6.2 graph

Objective AHS-6.2

SOURCE: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), AHRQ.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of persons who were unable to obtain or delay in obtaining necessary medical care. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. Data for the single-race categories are for persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.
FPL = Federal Poverty Level.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2010, 4.6% of the population were unable to obtain or delayed in obtaining necessary medical care. This rate varied by race and ethnicity as well as by family income. For example:.

  • 5.0% of the non-Hispanic white population were unable to obtain or delayed in obtaining necessary medical care, over one and a half times the rate for the Asian population, 3.2%.
  • Rates decreased as family incomes increased. 7.0% of persons whose family incomes were below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) were unable to obtain or delayed in obtaining necessary medical care, nearly two and a half times the rate for those at or above 600% of the FPL, 3.1%.

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